Study Guides (247,988)
Canada (121,207)
Psychology (680)
PS280 (28)
Midterm

Abnormal Midterm 2.docx

9 Pages
124 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS280
Professor
John Stephens
Semester
Fall

Description
Abnormal Midterm 2 Chapter 10­ Eating Disorders • Lifetime prevalence in the U.S. in 2001 and 2003 – Anorexia nervosa (women 0.9%; men 0.3%); Bulimia nervosa (women  1.5%; men 0.5%); Binge eating disorder (women 3.5%; men 2.0%) • One­year prevalence in Canada in 2002 – 0.5% of Canadians reported an eating disorder diagnosis (women 0.8%;  men 0.2%) – Women ages 15­24 reporting an eating disorder: 1.5%  – 1.7% of Canadians meet criteria for an eating attitude problem  • Eating disorders can cause long­term psychological, social and health problems  Types of Eating Disorders: ­Anorexia Nervosa (AN) ­Bulimia Nervosa (BN) ­Binge eating disorder ­Eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) Anorexia Nervosa (AN) ­Anorexia – loss of appetites ­Nervosa­ appetite loss due to emotional reasons ­Term a contradiction because most patients do not lose their appetite or interest  in food ­4 features required for the diagnosis: 1. refusal to maintain a normal body weight ( likely to have the  disorder themselves  • AN and BN á in identical twins than fraternal twins • heritability estimate of 56%  Eating Disorders and the Brain • Hypothalamus proposed to play a role in AN  • Paraventricular nucleus also implicated • Abnormal  cortisol • á endogenous opioids due to starvation • â regional mu­opioid receptor binding in the insular cortex in BN • â levels of serotonin metabolites in BN Socio­Cultural Variables­ • Steady progression toward increasing thinness as the ideal – Unrealistic cultural pressures • Scarlett O’Hara effect • á Body dissatisfaction • Activity Anorexia • Gender Influences   • Cross­Cultural Influences – Eating disorders more common in industrialized societies, such as the  United States, Canada, Japan, Australia, and Europe, than in non­ industrialized nations To diet or not to diet?­ • The diet industry is a multi­billion dollar a year business  • Hedonic system  • Heredity: 20­50% of variability is genetic  • Psychological factors  – Stress, motivation for thinness  – Dieting appears to be a predictor of ED  – False hope syndrome  • Dieting tends to lead to weight fluctuation and is a health risk factor Etiology: Psychological Views Cognitive­Behavioural Views on AN • Emphasize fear of fatness and body­image disturbance as the motivating factors  that make self­starvation and weight loss powerful reinforcers  – Behaviours that achieve or maintain thinness are negat­ively reinforced by  the â of anxiety about becoming fat.  – Dieting and weight loss may be + reinforced by the sense of mastery or  self­control they create  • see the thinspiration effect • Criticism from peers and parents about being overweight may also contribute to  ED Psychodynamic View • Disturbed parent­child relationships  • Symptoms of eating disorder fulfill some need or to avoid growing up sexually  Family Systems Theory • Relationship between patient and how the symptoms are embedded in a  dysfunctional family structure than may exhibit the following characteristics: – Enmeshment – Overprotectiveness  – Rigidity – Lack of conflict resolution ­Child Abuse Personality Factors  In AN • Perfectionistic, shy, and compliant before the onset of the disorder In BN • Histrionic features, affective instability, and an outgoing social disposition  BN and AN  • High in neuroticism and anxiety and low in self­esteem  • High on traditionalism, indicating strong endorsement • Narcissism Cognitive­Behavioral Theory of BN  Treatment of ED­ ­Up to 90% of people with ED are not in treatment and those who are in treatment are  often resentful  ­Biological Treatments • SSRIs in particular fluoxetine (Prozac)  – Frequently used to treat bulimia  – Helps reduce depression, distorted attitudes toward food and eating  • Unfortunately, SSRIs not consistently effective  • More drop­outs of studies in biological and cognitive­behavioural treatments  • Currently, there is no empirical basis for using antidepressants to treat AN Psychological Treatment of AN – Two­tiered process • Immediate goal is to help the patient gain weight nd • 2   goal of treatment is long­term maintenance of weight gain – Not yet reliably achieved – CBT of the maintenance of AN  • Based on an extreme need to control eating  • Tendency to judge self­worth in terms of shape and weight  • Treatment has shown  – Schema­Focused Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Family Systems Therapy,  and Interpersonal Therapy used to treat EDs Psychological Treatment of BN – CBT: treatment of choice for BN and binge eating disorder  Psychological Treatment of BN – CBT: treatment of choice for BN and binge eating disorder – Goal: to develop normal eating patterns  – Clients:  • Question society’s standards for physical attractiveness • Uncover and challenge detrimental beliefs about starving and  becoming overweight  • Learn that normal can be maintained with dieting  •
More Less

Related notes for PS280

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit