Study Guides (380,000)
CA (150,000)
York (10,000)
ANTH (200)
N/ A (3)
Final

ANTH 2140 Study Guide - Final Guide: Hamilton Police Service, Homicide, Autopsy


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTH 2140
Professor
N/ A
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows page 1. to view the full 4 pages of the document.
In August of 2010, local business man and Ancaster soccer coach Joseph Melo, then 46 years
of age, was found dead by one of his employees of the Home Care Pharmacy at Main Street East
and Edgemont Street North, a business he had co-ownership of. The Hamilton Police concluded,
after a post-mortem, that Melo’s death was definitely a homicide, though they could not specify
whether the victim struggled (Dunning and Nolan, 2010). Many individuals personally
connected to the Ancaster Soccer Club coach have been affected by the loss, as have the soccer
teams Melo coached for years, prior to his death. These individuals, who were quickly
interviewed by the police for details or information on Melo’s murder, only had compassionate
and heart-felt words for the former soccer coach and business man, among them being a fellow
soccer coach of Melo’s, who said that he, “..touched a lot of people” (Dunning and Nolan, 2010).
Although the investigation has not clarified whether Melo’s pharmacy business, or drugs, had
anything to do with the homicide, his murder gives the police one more name to add to the
increasing list of homicides this year, just in Hamilton alone.
This article, extracted from the Hamilton Spectator in August of 2010, presents to the reader
the ever-increasing case of local homicides taking place during the last year, in the city of
Hamilton. The article refers to 46 year old business man and soccer coach Joseph Melo, who was
murdered during the summer of 2010. Though there seemed to be no connection concerning
Melo’s business, and his life separate from work, the police were still apprehensive as to whether
there was a strong motive behind Melo’s murder. Furthermore, the authors of the article,
Dunning and Nolan, use specific examples of verbal symbolism, along with emotional appeal
through interviews, in order to present to the reader the case of what seems to be just another
innocent murder victim.
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version