1500-Accounting-Chp 8.docx

5 Pages
116 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Human Resources Management
Course
HRM 3430
Professor
Linda Love
Semester
Fall

Description
CHAPTER 8  In order for an organization to succeed it has to get a lot of things done right but in order for  an organization to fail it only has to get one thing wrong. If an organization does not have  enough cash to pay its debts when those debts are due creditors will force it into bankruptcy.  Managing the inflows and outflows of cash are critical to an organizations survival – liquidity management or cash flow management  The accruals method and cash flow: most of the info that goes into cash budget  comes from the organizations day to day operations; the ones that are reported in the  income statement and the ones in the operating budget for a future period; because we use  the accrual method to prepare the income statement we report the sales, purchases and  expenses in a way that reflects their effect on the wealth of the organization; a sale is  recognized (included on the income statement) when it is realized (when the property in the  goods passes from the seller to the buyer); this is not necessarily the same as when the  related cash flow occurs; we recognize expenses when their value has been used up and  again that is not exactly when the related cash flow occurs; the process of preparing the  operating budget which was talked about in the previous chapter gives us a good estimate  of the accrual based sales, direct costs of sales, operating expenses and financial charges;  it is one of the tasks of cash budgeting to transform those into expected cash flows  • Sales of goods or services will result in cash inflows • Direct costs of good bought for resale will cause cash outflows • Operating expenses incurred will cause cash outflows • Financial charges (interest paid and taxes) will cause cash outflows Cash receipts: sales revenues are the main source of cash receipts; in a pure cash  business (retail outlets) the sales revenue will be received immediately and receipts and  revenue will be identical; a business that sells on credit will have to wait to receive its cash  until the customer pays; in the same way that inventory uncouples production and demand,  allowing them each to happen at different rates making credit sales uncouples the act of  making a sale and the collection of the related cash; there may be other receipts of cash:  the sale of assets, issuing shares or from borrowing –each would have to be carefully  estimated as to its expected amount and its timing  Cash payments: the biggest dollar item of outgoings on the income statement of most  organizations will be the direct cost of sales; (goods bought for resale in a retail shop, raw  materials and direct production costs of a manufacturer and direct costs of service inputs in  a service company...they translate into the biggest cash outflows too); in the same way that  credit sales uncouple the sale and its related cash flows buying goods on credit uncouples  the resource flow that appears in the income statement from the related cash flow; any  change in inventory has to be recognized as influencing cash flows; if inventory is increased  it implies a related cash outflow to buy the additional inventory but by contrast when  inventory is reduced sales can be made without replacing inventory and the cash outflow  will be less than it otherwise would have been; the direct cost of sales includes raw  materials which are budgeted to be 50% of the sales amount; the companys plan is to have  enough inventory at the start of every month to satisfy sales for that month; raw material  purchases have to be paid for by the end of the second month following delivery; the direct  cost of sales also includes production wages and are budgeted to be 10% of the sales  amount; production wages are paid in the same month that they are incurred so the  resource flow shown in the income statement is the same as the cash flow; in a current  income statement amortization is the recognition of the gradual expiry over time of an  investment in assets made some years earlier; amortization does not affect current cash  flows so it must be deducted from the expense amount to get the net amount actually paid in  the month; a negative cash balance is unacceptable and the implication is that some  payments that were due to be made would not get made and the outcome would be that the  creditors who were owed money would seek redress in the legal system and have the  company declared bankrupt  Liquidity management: a company that has a net cash outflow for each month and  an expected net cash deficit at the end of each month; the first issue to think twice about is  paying the dividend to shareholders –a company that is expecting to lose over the next three  months is in no position to pay more out in dividends; dividends are always under the control  of the company directors so they have the discretion to cancel it; defer payments for  equipment for a later date or lease equipment instead of buying it; if cash outflow exceeds  the total cash inflows the company should consider financing options; if a company believes  that it has a short term problem then the company may expect that the rest of the year will  be profitable and that the profitability translates into high cash inflows so that its liquidity  problem will be automatically solved –if so they should approach the bank and show their  full
More Less

Related notes for HRM 3430

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit