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Final

HUMA 1625 Study Guide - Final Guide: Missing Person, Phonaesthetics


Department
Humanities
Course Code
HUMA 1625
Professor
Sherry J.F.Rowley
Study Guide
Final

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Entry 3
In this third portfolio entry I will be using the critical skill Suspending and
Reserving Judgment (waiting until you have fully understood something to start
analyzing it) to explore themes and texts that relate and connect to the course. I will be
demonstrating this critical skill through the themes Power of Story/Storytelling and
Power of Language, which are exemplified in the texts “The Disappearance of Elaine
Coleman”, by Millhauser and “Blue Nines and Red Words”, by Tammet. The purpose of
the critical skill Suspending and Reserving Judgment is to reserve judgment until you
have finished the material and have thought critically about it to draw the response you
need to bring to the table.
Firstly, in the text “The Disappearance of Elaine Coleman”, by Millhauser I will
be exploring the theme the power of story and storytelling. Storytelling is a form of art; it
requires creativity and sometimes even imagination. The way a story is told/ written can
make a very powerful impression of the reader/audience. Stories are powerful. They
delight, enchant, touch, teach, recall, inspire, motivate, and challenge. Every story is
different and it produces changes in its own way. When you tell a story your goal is to
grab the audience’s attention, stir up emotions, make a connection and most importantly
keep the readers interested. Additionally, the title of the text “The Disappearance of
Elaine Coleman” caught my attention. I wanted to read the story to know what it was
about. The author Millhauser tells the story in a it keeps the readers wondering
throughout how the story ends. Personally my favorite literary genre is mystery, therefore
when I saw the word “Disappearance” in the title it interested me right away. Throughout
the story we see how the audience talks about the missing person Elaine Coleman, in the
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