Study Guides (248,368)
Canada (121,499)
York University (10,209)
Humanities (404)
HUMA 1160 (44)
Midterm

Test 2

4 Pages
879 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Humanities
Course
HUMA 1160
Professor
Robin Metcalfe
Semester
Fall

Description
Human Enlightenment  Exam #2 Prep 1) A) Why is the denial of the Cogito ergo Sum not logically self­contradictory? • Pierre Gassendi raises the question to Descartes that clarity and distinctness seem  to be a subjective criteria of truth as they are different for everyone o Gassendi gives the example of a melon which he once thought tasted good  as a child, however he doesn’t think it taste good anymore, as well as the  example that people go to war to fight for their beliefs • Gassendi wanted to know a method to know what is clear and distinct • Descartes replies to Gassendi, calling him o’flesh, as he is tied to his senses o Descartes has already explained all this in his Meditation 1 with  hyperbolic doubt  • The Cogito Ergo Sum is Descartes first, first truth • Cogito Ergo Sum is Latin for I think therefore I am • In the Meditations, Descartes does not say Cogito Ergo Sum or I think therefore I  am, he merely has analogies of Cogito Ergo Sum • A contradiction is when you affirm and then deny the same features in the same  subject, the same way at the same time o For example, I am here and I am not here • Contradictions are never true • If a contradiction is not true, then denying the contradiction must be true • There are some sentences who’s truths can be established by showing that their  denial is contradictory o For example, the statement all bachelors are unmarried males o By denying the statement you arrive at, some bachelors are not unmarried  males o When rewritten using unmarried males as bachelors as they are synonyms  you arrive at some bachelors are not bachelors which is a contradiction • Descartes says that the denial of the Cogito Ergo Sum is a contradiction • A.J. Ayer does not see the contradiction in I think therefore I exist • A.J. Ayer is right, because denying the Cogito Ergo Sum does not lead to a  contradiction • Once we know that the Cogito Ergo Sum is true we can generalize it and say all  thinking things exist o By denying the statement you arrive at, some thinking things do not exist • This statement is not self­contradictory o Therefore, exist or do not exist does not contradict thinking • Therefore, there is no logical contradiction in denying the Cogito Ergo Sum • There is only two conclusions that one can reach: o Either Descartes doesn’t know what he is talking about, or we don’t know  what we’re talking about B) Furthermore, establish what Descartes does mean when he claims that the denial  of the Cogito ergo Sum is self­contradictory.  • There are two hypothetical syllogisms in Descartes arguments o An example of a hypothetical syllogism is, if you study then you will pass,  if you pass then you will get a good job,  o If the Cogito Ergo Sum is doubted it is thought o If the Cogito Ergo Sum is thought then it is believed to be true o Therefore, if the Cogito Ergo Sum is doubted, then it is believed to be true o If the Cogito Ergo Sum is doubted then the Cogito Ergo Sum is believed  to be true o If the Cogito Ergo Sum is doubted then the Cogito Ergo Sum cannot be  doubted o Therefore if the Cogito Ergo Sum is doubted the Cogito Ergo Sum cannot  be doubted • The statement the denial of the Cogito Ergo Sum is self­contradictory is subject to  two interpretations and only one is what Descartes intends o One interpretation is that the denial of the Cogito Ergo Sum is self  contradictory  As in, “Some thinking things do not exist” o The second interpretation is what is self­contradictory is the act of denial o Therefore, Descartes says if the Cogito Ergo Sum is doubted, you find that  you can not doubt it  • Descartes is fundamentally saying that no matter how you try to doubt the Cogito  Ergo Sum, it doesn’t matter o All tools of skepticism, or hyperbolic doubt, all tools to doubt the Cogito  Ergo Sum, necessarily fail • Therefore, there is no way to establish the doubt of the Cogito Ergo Sum, it  follows that the Cogito Ergo Sum is necessarily true 2) Discuss fully the manner in which Descartes seeks a knowledge of God in the  third meditation, in light of the fact that he holds that knowledge of God is a self­ evident first principle, obtained through his method of Analysis.  • Descartes gives 2 proofs for the existence of God in Meditation III o Both proofs for the existence of God center around objective
More Less

Related notes for HUMA 1160

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit