Study Guides (248,069)
Canada (121,279)
York University (10,191)
Humanities (404)
HUMA 1970 (44)
Midterm

Select People midterm.docx

8 Pages
98 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Humanities
Course
HUMA 1970
Professor
Cheryl Cowdy- Crawford
Semester
Fall

Description
Select People  Philippe Ariès: ­ Argue that a concept of childhood largely lacking in the Middle Ages ­ Claim due to the uncertainty of ‘infant’ survival in the Middle Ages, child­rearing  was characterized by an indifference to babies ­ A new concept of childhood was born that would lay the foundations of our  modern romanticized viewpoint ­ The creation & diffusion of the modern idea of childhood went hand in hand with  the development of two other significant social development: 1) The invention of the modern family:  Led to new ideas about childhood which ‘recognized that the child was  not ready for life & he had to be subjected to a special treatment, a sort of  quarantine, before he was allowed to join the adults’ 2) The rise of the bourgeoisie:  Modern concepts of childhood & the family initially took root among the  urban well­to­do ­ Claim, children were depicted as small adults REPRESENTATIONS OF CHILDHOOD: 1) Figure 1: the child is not based on a real child, but is a stylized representation  of Jesus 2) Figure 2: the theme is religious, the children are represented much more  naturalistically—they could have been modeled on actual children 3) Figure 3: the differences between children & adults are very clearly marked in  dress, in the way they play with the dog & their position at the feet of the  adults. The theme is secular and the family portrayed is aristocratic  4) Figure 4: shows a Victorian tea party, where the tone of the picture is much  more sentimental. The children in this picture are playing, being brought gifts  & are obviously separate from adult life  Criticisms for Ariès: ­ Ariès reliance on paintings is highly problematic:  Works of art are not produced in a social & political vacuum but usually  commissioned by a particular person or institution for a specific purpose Paintings in the Middle Ages were almost exclusively connected with,   and painted for, religious purposes ­ Critics have argues that his interpretation of pictures & his views about the lack of  parental love for children were wrong, claiming that children have always been  loved & valued  Thomas Hobbes: ­ The Puritan Discourse ­ Childhood as a time of evil & wildness ­ Belief in origin sin ­ Rigid code of normal behavior essential to salvation ­ Salvation comes from God alone ­ For Hobbes, absolutism of sovereign government  John Locke: ­ The ‘Tabula Rasa” discourse ­ Childhood as a time of becoming ­ Children as tabula rasa (blank slates) ­ Advocated milder ways of teaching and rearing children ­ Believed children learn through play and need pleasant books to read ­ Advocated treating children as rational creatures capable of understanding reason  Mary Ashun:  Rona Charles and Sally Treloyn  Jean­Jacques Rousseau: ­ The Romantic Discourse ­ Childhood as a time of innocence ­ Nature good, society bad ­ “True education is simply the development of the origin nature of the child” ­ “The education we receive comes from three sources—nature, men & things”  Michel Foucault: ­ Theories explored relationship between knowledge & power ­ Discursive networks like a network or web, with individuals both exercising  power & being affected by it ­ Power permeates human relationships at all levels, from the personal to the  institutional  Sigmund Freud: ­ Study children in residential care during the Second World War  Jean Piaget: ­ Claim that children’s cognitive development should pass through several stages:  Sensorimotor Stage (0­2):           The child begins to interact with the environment  Preoperational Stage (2­6 or 7): The child begins to represent the world symbolically  Concrete operational Stage (7­11 or 12): The child learns rules such as conservation  Forma operational Stage (12­adulthood): The adolescent can transcend the concrete situation & think about the future  Jean­Marc Itard: ­ Believing that the child’s strange & immature behavior was the result of years of  deprivation & social isolation ­ Wild Boy of Aveyron ­ Influenced by John Lock & tabula rasa  Lev Vygotsky: ­ Challenged notion of the universal child calling it a search for the ‘eternal’ child ­ Argued that child development is embedded in the social & cultural contexts of  children’s individual lives at a particular time in history ­ Child development must be understood as a product of a specific economic, social  & cultural context  Chris Jenks: ­ Explains that childhood is a ‘totalising concept’  All humans have, at some point in their lives, been a child:’ it is the only  truly common experience of being human, infant mortality is no exception’ ­ Explains that the ubiquity of childhood can actually work to obscure its analytic  importance ­ Childhood is such a commonplace and visible aspect of everyday life that the  sociocultural worlds of children may not seem like an important area for research ­ The child is familiar to us and yet strange, he or she inhabits our world and yet  seems to answer to another, he or she is essentially of ourselves and yet seems to  display a systematically different order of being  Allison James & Alan Prout: ­ Characteristic features of new paradigm: 1) Childhood is understood as a social construction 2) Childhood is a variable of social analysis 3) Children’s social relationships & cultures are worthy of study in their own  right 4) Children are & most be seen as active in the construction & determination of  their own social lives 5) Ethnography is a useful methodology for the study of childhood  6) A new paradigm means engaging in the process of reconstructing childhood in  society  Alison James: ­ Had a study of children & young people’s consumption of cheap sweets in  England in the 1970’s  Nikolas Rose: ­ Genealogy:  defines how  we  think of ourselves  & act upon ourselves  (In  Governing the Soul: The Shaping of the Private Self 1999) ­ It is commonplace, to refer to the objects of the scientific imagination as ‘socially  constructed’ ­ Offers ‘a
More Less

Related notes for HUMA 1970

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit