Study Guides (248,397)
Canada (121,509)
York University (10,209)
KINE 2031 (88)
Neil Smith (69)
Quiz

Psych 1010 lecture notes for test 1.docx

8 Pages
101 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology & Health Science
Course
KINE 2031
Professor
Neil Smith
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture notes for test 1 Psych 1010 – Sept 16 th ­psychology is based on a lot of research  types of research: ­ survey method    consists of written questions that are used to determine people’s  attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors advantage: test large numbers, cheap, efficient disadvantage: number of responses may be limited, people may lie or misinterpret  the questions ­pilot study is a mini study to make sure there are no problems with the study before  going full force with the research  ­sample must be  proper representation of the population; not biased  ­basic way to make sure your sample is not biased is a method called random sampling :  each person in the population has an equal chance of being chosen for the sample  ­naturalistic observation: watching and observing someone  disadvantage: researcher may only see what they want to see or they may miss  something, may misinterpret something, people may notice they are being  watched and may act differently (subject reactivity), have very little control ­unobtrusive methods: ways which you can observe people without them  knowing  ­experimental method: change the value of one thing and see if that change, changes the  outcome (eg. Checking the amount of alcohol between people) disadvantage: often in a lab setting and people may be nervous and act differently  advantage: you have control over the variables (something that can change); you  can infer a cause and affect relationship  independent variable: the variable that the experimenter changes or manipulates  to see if it has an affect on behaviour ; the cause  (eg. alcohol) dependent variable: the behaviour that is measured to see if the independent  variable had an affect ; the affect (eg. Memory) ­control group: is a group that is used as a standard for comparison and is similar  to the experimental group in every way except that it gets the zero level of the  independent variable (eg. The group that gets the 0 amount of alcohol)   1 ­confounding variable: a variable that interferes with the results of the study, it  affects the dependent variable too so that you don’t know whether the results are  caused by independent variable, the confounding variable or both; variable that  you don’t want in your study; study is useless if you have it ­random assignment to groups: when you randomly assign people to groups  you are assuming that all individual differences are being evenly distributed  among groups so that they are all equal  ­correlational method: measures the degree of relationship between two variables,  there’s no attempt to manipulate some variables and control others, rather naturally  occurring changes on both variables are measured to see if they are related. Correlations  help us make predictions  ­cannot infer causality  ­no dependant and independent variables; you aren’t manipulating anything, you  can only say that X and Y are related ­correlation coefficient (r = +  ­) : the number is never higher than 1 ­  1 means that it is a prefect correlation (linear graph) ­  0 means no correlation (no predictability)  ­ + means that the value of both variables are changing in the same direction ­  ­ means // opposite direction ­ double biased study : where not only the subject unaware of the hypothesis/groups, but  so is the experimenter. This reduces the possibility of experimenter bias effect ­self fulfilling prophecy: experimenter has a certain expectation so that may lead you to  behave a certain way to the subject which will also affect the subject’s behavior and they  act in a way that agrees with your hypothesis  ­Statistics: ­descriptive statistics: allow you to summarize and describe characteristics of your scores Sept 30, 2009 lect 4 2 Standard deviation:  ­measures the average of scores(deviation) from the mean. It takes into account all scores  in the distribution and not just the highest and lowest ones. The greater the variability or  spread of scores, the higher the standard deviation.  Normal Distribution:  ­important for 2 reasons: − most pyschological variables are normally distributed. − It provides a precise way of determining how people compare to one another  on a given test  new score standard scores percentage scores Percentile scores: indicate the percentage of people who score of an below the score you  obtained. Its a score that is compared relatively to rest of the people.  Descriptive statistics inferential stats Inferential Stats: inferential stats provides us with a way of determining how much  confidence we can have in results obtained from samples by telling us how likely it is that  results are due to chance alone.  Real: true of population=Statistically significant probability level is what we look at if the results are statistically significant or not.  Statistical cut off: if the results are lower than 0.05 then the results are real­significant. If they are higher then 0.05 then the results are due to chance and not statistically  significant. 3 PSYCHOANALYTIC APPROACH (SIGMUND FREUD) − We re governed by unconscious conflicts according to Freud: instincts are the basic building blocks of his theory. Everybody is  b
More Less

Related notes for KINE 2031

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit