Study Guides (248,430)
Canada (121,530)
York University (10,209)
KINE 3350 (17)
Midterm

KINE 2049 Research Methods Notes for test 1.docx

12 Pages
182 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology & Health Science
Course
KINE 3350
Professor
Kathy Broderick
Semester
Winter

Description
Research Methods Notes for Test 1 Chapter 1: ­sub disciplines of exercise science include: adapted physical education, biomechanics,  exercise physiology, biochemistry, growth & development, sport history, sport nutrition,  sport sociology and etc ­parity claims uses wording that gives the reader the impression that one product is  superior to another when actually it is only just as good as other products ­testimonials are statements providing evidence in support of a claim ­the claim that these products are equally effective for all people is not necessarily true  ­statistical information: ads try to appear objective or scientific is to give statistical  information  ­eg. “instantly boosts skin’s moisture by over 600%”; where do these numbers  come from? There isn’t enough info to evaluate the stats ­NNT=Number needed to treat ­NNT is an estimate of the # of patients that would have to be treated with the drug  before the meds actually prevent a serious outcome (like death, stroke etc) ­NNH= Number needed to harm ­NNH is how many need to be treated to cause harm (side effects) ­low NNT is good but large NNH is good  ­NNT is the inverse of absolute risk reduction (ARR)  NNT = 1/ARR ­ways of “knowing” or gaining knowledge: 1) custom & tradition 2) authority 3) personal experience  4) reasoning 5) scientific inquiry  ­main goal of research is gathering and interpreting of info to answer questions  ­research is about finding solutions to problems in a logical, orderly, and systematic  fashion ­6 steps in research: 1 1) ask a new Q 2) make initial observations 3) conduct systematic investigation 4) analyze the new info 5) interpret the findings 6) integrate findings with previous knowledge  ­basic goal of science is to develop a body of knowledge based on facts ­theory is a set of related statements that explain a set of facts ­most researches believe theories are never proven  ­there are only competing theories of differing levels of acceptance ­theories have 2 roles in development of knowledge: 1) help organize info and facts about events or behaviors 2) used to make predictions that provide the basis for new research  ­3 factors help researchers judge merits of competing theories: precision, simplicity  (Occam’s razor), testability ­precision is how accurately a theory describes behavior or makes predictions  ­simplicity is referred to the number of qualifiers or special conditions that must be met  before a theory can be used to make accurate predictions (less qualifiers needed are  favoured) ­testability refers to the extent to which empirical methods may be used to gather  evidence about a theory  ­Levels of Knowledge: Description – eg. Heart disease affect ___# of people Prediction – smoking increases risks Control – tell people to “stop smoking” Explanation – able to clearly explain what is happening; “why?” ­hypothesis is a prediction stemming from a theory  ­only non directional (Null) hypothesis can be tested statistically  2 Hypothesis  ▯Theory  ▯Law ­scientific knowledge has several levels: description of behaviour, prediction of  behaviour, control of behaviour, and explanation of behavior  ­research to describe: makes no attempt to predict just to explain; it is important  because comparisons can be made with past measurements so that trends or unusual  occurrences can be identified  ­research to predict: looks at relationships among variables; prediction is more powerful  than description  ­research control: if we understand how events are related to each other, we can begin to  control events; in order to control we must understand relationships so we can affect  variables to produce the intended result  ­research to explain: this research is more difficult to develop then the others because it  requires an understanding of cause and effect relationship  ­deductive reasoning is logically drawing conclusions; general to specific  ­observations of general facts are shaped to explain specific occurrences  ­problem: assumptions made about behaviour may be difficult to test and may be  wrong  ­eg. This stove is hot therefore all stoves are hot… ­inductive reasoning going from specific to general  ­this is preferred because of reliance on empirical observation  ­pugs are dogs; spot is a pug; therefore spot is a dog  Scientific Axioms: ­amorality: ­scientific development of knowledge is neither moral nor immoral; it just contributes to  the knowledge base ­morality of methods or application of knowledge may be debated but knowledge itself is  morally neutral  ­caution: ­scientists must be careful when gathering data  3 ­findings gain weight when they are replicated or are found to apply well in other  situations  ­consistency:  ­argues that universe is orderly and remains constant for long periods of time ­if the universe went under frequent changes then the knowledge accumulated over time  would not be worthwhile ­determinism: ­cause for all events can be determined and take place for certain reasons ­empiricism: ­knowledge should be based on observations in the real world and should not be based on  logical arguments, opinions, or intuitions ­intelligibility: ­humans have the ability to understand the world ­objectivity: ­scientists must remain impartial when making observations and must strive to maintain  objectivity  ­parsimony: ­all things being equal, the simplest and most concise explanation is preferred ­physical reality: ­real things are subject to study and understanding  ­quantifiability:  ­what exists, exists to the extent that can be observed and measured  ­skepticism: ­knowledge remains open to criticism or challenge  Chapter 2: ­intro and lit review section has 2 functions: 1) present a discussion of the question under investigation 2) present a review of the literature relevant to the question 4 ­purpose of the into is to establish the foundation for the question ­the lit review is accompanied in part by citing previously published reports ­one of the most important things in a lit review is its references  ­questions are the fuel that power research  ­most research questions originate from 3 sources: theories, previous research, or  practical problems ­“over­exclusive error” is when author fails to adequately describe the underlying  theoretical principle that are driving the research question  ­“over­inclusive error” is when the author describes so many facets of the theory that the  presentation lacks focus  ­a fatal error occurs when there is a lack of theoretical or conceptual rationale whatsoever  ­theories help researchers to ask new questions  ­by asking new questions based on theory, knowledge accumulates in a relatively orderly  fashion  ­when assessing the strength of a theory, researchers consider the weight of all evidences  ­a common by product of an investigation is the uncovering of several new questions ­inconsistent findings from previous research provide a good source for research  questions ­many studies are designed to address practical problems that are not necessarily based  in theory; goal of this is to solve immediate problems than to test theoretical predictions  ­basic research addresses fundamental questions; explores fundamental principles that  are normally theoretical in nature; its goal is to discover new knowledge ­applied research examines practical problems that are not theoretically based; goal is  solve an immediate problem  ­examples: basic: exercise physiology might study various biochemical adaptations to  exercise applied: might study the most affective method for training middle distance runners ­qualitative research relies on observations of behaviour in natural situations ­ethnographic in nature  ­the goal it to only describe what happened  5 ­not conducted under as tightly controlled conditions and doesn’t rely as much on  numerical info ­does not rely on manipulation of variables  ­the researcher is the main tool for obtaining data ­quantitative research relies on strict experimental control and uses numerical info to  describe behaviour  ­primary tools used are tests and procedures that are examined for their reliability,  validity, and objectivity ­extensive planning and lab environments is used  ­descriptive research describes behviours and events as they naturally occur ­uses methods such as: surveys, observational techniques, historical investigations,  correlation measurements  ­experimental research examines cause and effect relationship ­manipulates variables to learn how these manipulations affect events or behaviours  ­goal is to explore and understand cause and effect relationships  ­investigators actively create two different situations or environmental and then  determine if the measured variable exhibits any changes  ­longitudinal research tracks a specific group of individuals over time ­same subjects are observed or measured repeatedly over a period of months or years ­advantage: developmental changes can be assessed more precisely over time ­disadvantage: time consuming and complicated  ­* cannot infer cause and effect! C
More Less

Related notes for KINE 3350

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit