Study Guides (247,961)
Canada (121,198)
York University (10,191)
KINE 3350 (17)
Midterm

KINE 2049 Research Methods Notes for Test 2.docx

14 Pages
167 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology & Health Science
Course
KINE 3350
Professor
Kathy Broderick
Semester
Winter

Description
Research Methods Notes for Test 2: Chapter 5 Experimental Research: ­methods section of a paper is meant to explain details of how the investigation was  conducted ­how do you know if methods section is detailed enough? If you can replicate the study  then its good ­if it is possible to measure all members of a population (census) any resultant fact about  the population is called a parameter  ­sample is any subset of a population  ­facts about a sample are called statistics and they represent estimates of parameters ­researcher must ask: how large should the sample be and how will the individuals be  picked to be in the sample ­as the sample size increases the accuracy of the research increases as well ­if there is a flaw in the sample selection then the size doesn’t matter because it wont  make it accurate  ­simple random process is best way to select subjects from the population ­every member of the population must have an equal opportunity in being picked  ­systematic sampling: if the population was put in some sort of systematic fashion (such  as alphabetic order) then every nth name would be selected ­stratified sampling: population is divided into relevant subgroups an then random  sampling techniques are applied to each subgroup; stratification can be done on more  than one variable ­quota sampling: is like stratified sampling but does not involve random selection from  the various levels identified; this sampling is convenient but you cant defend any  conclusions because it is not a representative from the entire population ­cluster sampling: used for large populations where it is impossible to obtain lists of all  members; sample consists of groups of subjects selected from the population ­eg. Randomly select 5 countries, randomly select 5 school districts from each  country, then select 5 school from each district ­cluster sampling does not lead to a random sampling and so conclusions cannot be  drawn for the represented population 1 ­accidental sampling: is a self selected sample which is often seen in magazine surveys,  street corner surveys, and TV surveys; respondents tend to be interested in the issue and  that’s why they take part in the survey  ­the ONLY absolutely appropriate sampling technique for a research project is simple  random sampling  ­IF the researcher can show that the sample used does not differ in any important way  from the population interest; it may be possible to regard the sample as representative ­characteristics that have the ability to change are termed variables ­variable is a characteristic that will exhibit different values under different conditions  (example: heart rate) ­fundamental goal of research is to understand how variables behave or react to different  conditions in the environment  ­independent variables are those variables that are manipulated by the investigator  ­cause and effect relationship refers to the ability to describe changes in the value of an  affected variable when a first variable is manipulated  ­dependent variable is the variable measured in an experiment, also called the outcome  variable  ­independent and dependent variables are the foundation of the research process ­selection, manipulation, and measurement of these variables allow researchers to explore  the relationship between and among them ­operational definition formally defines the characteristics of a variable; they are  important so other researchers can completely understand the details of the research  ­it is important to any factor that might possibly cause changes in the dependent variable  other than those that are manipulated  ­control variables is a variable that is held constant; there are 2 types: 1) experimental control variables ­in most cases the number of control variables is greater than the number of independent  and dependent variables  ­it is crucial in an experiment to fix as many control variables as possible so the effect of  the independent variable on the dependent variable can be isolated ­the selection of control variables can also limit the eventual discussion of results to the  level of the control variable picked  2) statistical control variables 2 ­statistical techniques are available in experiments to provide control over variables that  might impact the result of an experiment  ­example: study of muscular strength development, even though the subjects have  different body weights a technique is used to make all subjects equal in body weight ­the reason this is not used all the time is because this procedure “costs” something in  terms of other statistical concerns and it only applies to some situations ­control groups is another method for controlling the variables ­an additional level is added in the independent variable and this group is exposed to  everything the treatment groups are except the specific treatments; it isolates the  treatment as the only possible cause of any detected difference ­confounding variable is a variable that is unintentionally allowed to vary  ­confounding variables can negate the result of an experiment by providing alternate  explanations for the findings ­measurements obtained from one observation to the next, from one subject to the next,  or from one condition to the next can, and do vary ­primary variance (or systematic variance) is the expected or desired variance in the  measurement of the dependent variable and is caused by the effect of the independent  variable ­primary variance is wanted and consistent variation in the measurement of the  dependent variable  ­secondary variance is the consistent but unwanted variation in the measurements of the  dependent variable  ­if sources of secondary variances are present in the measurement methods, then it results  will consistently overestimate or underestimate the true value of the dependent variable  ­error variance is the inconsistent and unwanted variations in the measurements of the  dependent variable  ­experimentalist can also introduce error variance through imprecise measurement  ­effect of error variance is unpredictable and reduces the accuracy of the measurement of  the dependent variable ­Maximizing primary variance: ­one goal of research is to show the effects of different levels of an independent variable  on the dependent variable ­to do this the researcher must fix the independent variables at levels far enough apart  that an effect may be observed  3 ­finding the optimal values for the levels of the independent variable is crucial in any  experiment  ­Controlling secondary variance: ­carefully controlling it improves the value of research findings ­one way secondary variance can be reduced is by careful selection and assignment of  subjects to experimental groups  ­randomization or matching are 2 methods of controlling unwanted consistent differences  between subjects ­blind experimental design will help reduce experimenter bias or expectancy influence ­properly calibrated equipment is another way to control sources of secondary variance ­Minimizing error variance: ­use samples that are representative of the population ­proper data analysis techniques can also help reduce error variance ­Research Validity: ­internal validity refers to the technical quality of a study; it involves the certainty with  which the results of an experiment can be attributed to the effect of the independent  variable rather than some confounding variable  ­if internal validity is high then the effects on the dependent variable can be attributed to  the effect of the independent variable rather than some confounding variable  ­if internal validity is low, then the observed effect of the independent variable on the  dependent variable is less convincing  ­external validity refers to the level with which findings of a study can be generalized to  other situations, people, or environments  ­in other words, how well can the findings describe, explain, or predict the behaviours of  individuals other than those in the study ­if the external validity is high then the results can apply to wide range of situations or  populations and vise versa ­Factors threatening internal validity  ­uncontrolled variables are the largest threat to the internal validity of a study  ­threats to internal validity generally fall into 2 categories: threats concerning subjects  and their behaviour or treatment during the experiment and threats related to  experimental procedures or instrumentation 4 ­local history is any unanticipated event occurring during the study that may have altered  the subjects’ behaviour in an uncontrolled and unaccountable way  ­experimental treatments often take place over an extended time period it is possible that  a local event may occur and affect treatment groups differentially ­one way to eliminate local history threats is to remove affected subjects from the study,  if they can be identified ­removing these subjects decreases sample size and reduces statistical power  ­local history threats are also controlled by using control groups and by maintaining equal  conditions among groups ­maturation of subjects is a threat to internal validity when this change affects the  subjects’ behaviour in unaccounted ways ­example: did the student get stronger because of the weight training class or because he  matured physically over the semester?  ­random or matched random subject assignment procedures are the best ways to control  for subject maturation by distributing it equally among groups ­matched random subject assignment occurs when subjects are matched on some  important control variable (ex. Body weight) and then the subjects who have been  matched with one another are randomly assigned to treatment groups  ­pretesting is a threat because many subjects may “learn” how to take post­test and this  experience causes the subsequent improvements rather than the treatment  ­instrumentation refers to the effect of human or equipment measurement errors during  the data collection  ­statistical regression is the statistical tendency for extreme scores to move toward the  group mean when measured a second time; its effect is controlled by using the most  reliable measure available, double testing subjects, and using stat techniques that make  allowances for its presence  ­differential selection of subjects is when the subject in the different treatment conditions  are not equal on relevant characteristics as a result of improper or unavoidable selection  and/or assignment procedures  ­experiments that rely on volunteer subjects may be exposed to this threat ­experimental mortality refers to the uneven loss of subjects from the various treatment  categories during the course of the study  ­this is only a problem if there is a differential mortality or if subjects are lost  from one group and not from another  5 ­this threat can be limited by: providing incentives, determining the type of  subjects that tent to drop out and removing similar subjects from other groups,  using random assignment methods, beginning the study with more subjects that  needed  ­increasing internal validity:  ­carefully conduction the experiment increases internal validity by reducing threats ­systematic elimination of potential confounding variables may be the most important  factor in protecting internal validity ­best recommendations to maintain strong internal validity are: 1) randomly assign subjects to groups 2) use control groups 3) be as careful as possible when making measurements ­factors threatening external validity: ­subjects – most studies are done on college students but how well do college students  represent other members of society? ­pre­test sensitization – commonly used to asses group equivalence before initiation of  treatment trials  ­pre­test may sensitize subjects to the nature of the study and may influence their  behaviour later on  ­one way to deal with the problems: design the study so that half of the subjects are  pretested and half are not; you can also replicate the study without a pretest  ­its better to rely on proper random sampling procedures than a pre­test ­expectancy – this refers to unintentional effect on the study caused by researcher’s prior  beliefs of the outcome of the stuffy; “self fulfilling prophecy”; you can control these by  introducing double bind or automated procedures whenever possible  ­Hawthorne effect – is when people are shown more productive simply because they  knew they were subjects in an experiment; best way to limit this is to have a control  group and unobtrusive measures ­over generalizing – experiments are based on limited number of independent and  dependent variables. An external validity issue is the problem of generalizing  experimental findings beyond the conditions of the original experiment  ­Improving external validity  ­subject selection – define the population and produce a proper sample 6 ­replication is the best method for demonstrating external validity  ­conceptual replication occurs when a study is modified by changing the independent  variable or measuring the dependent variable differently ; goal is to demonstrate similar  results under a broader range of conditions than the original research  ­Relationships between internal and external validity  ­judgments about the external validity of a study are dependent to some extent on  judgments of internal validity  ­if experiment is found lacking in internal validity, examination of the external validity is  not important since the results of the study are in doubt and this its generalizability  becomes a moot point   ­reliability concerns the consistency or depend
More Less

Related notes for KINE 3350

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit