Study Guides (248,363)
Canada (121,503)
York University (10,191)
LING 2450 (2)
Final

LING 2450 Final Notes.docx

9 Pages
168 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Linguistics
Course
LING 2450
Professor
Patrick J Connor
Semester
Fall

Description
1 LING 2450 Final Notes  Key Concepts   • Gratuitous Concurrence Occur in interrogations where there’s a strong power imbalance between  questioner and witness/suspect, saying yes when you don’t actually mean it – “free agreement”. Often play a role in coercive false confession – questioners are in a more powerful  discursive position than answerers. • Standard Language Ideology “Handicap” notion – compares not­speaking English to a disability, English seen as the neutral vehicle of communication, “Standard Language” into which others should be readily translatable. Beliefs about language shape testimony & its reception by others. Ideas ppl have regarding what language is or what language is good for. • Referential Transparency Assumes that languages provide labels for pre­existing concepts, and ignores the  indexing (connection between linguistic sign and context) function.  The verbatim theory, or the assumption that expressions in one language can be  unproblematically rendered into propositions and translated ‘verbatim’ into  another. • Equal Authenticity Both language versions of a bilingual statute/regulation are official, original and  authoritative expressions of the law. Neither version has the status of  copy/translation – neither enjoys priority/paramount over the other. Statutes exist in English & French, and bot versions are effective as law. Autonomous & whole by itself.  • Shared Meaning Rule If one rule is ambiguous and the other is not, then courts usually apply the shared  2 meaning. Assumption that both version of a legislative text must declare the same law. • Legal Pluralism Different jurisdiction adapts different rules  • Entextualization The construction of a record… of verbal performances in institutional settings. e.g. court records (transcript), other reports prepared by institutional agents; also  written documents prepared by attorneys for clients – deposition, affidavit,  statement of claim, etc. Made by institutional representatives for institutional purposes – shape by the  language ideology & practices of the institution. • Indirect Speech Acts Occur in situations of power asymmetry, but they are also perceived as more  polite than direct ones. e.g. framing a request as a question rather than a command – implying that the  person is free to act otherwise.  Not always legally sufficient to evoke the right to remain silent – Miranda’s right. • Performative Speech Acts Occur in evoking Miranda’s Right but speech acts can be indirect or direct.  Language ideology affects their interpretation – Courts are deciding based on  assumptions about the nature of human communication • Contamination by context If some participants speak of illegal acts, this makes all participants look  complicit, even ones who didn’t speak. • Vernacular Language as a clue to a person’s places of origin – characteristic of the  community in which they grew up. A sign of socialization rather than citizenship. Acquired in childhood, spoken with fellow vernacular speakers (family/friends),  low self­awareness (speaker doesn’t pay attention to how s/he speaks), likely  spoken “at home” and in informal settings. 3 • Deterritorialized (Non­vernacular speech) Spoken with ppl who speak other varieties (strangers). Depends on situation – speaker may carefully monitor his/her speech. Likely spoken when away from home and in formal­unfamiliar settings. • Language Identification Language as a clue to a person’s place of origin – vernacular use • Author Identification Probabilistic conclusion and have not yet had reliable results. Can distinguish person X likely or not likely to be the author of disputed text. Comparing suspicious text messages reveals systematic differences – suggesting  that they were not written by the same person. Differences are easier to prove than  similarities. Can be detected through the use of vernaculars • Speech Acts  Locution (what’s being said), Illocution (what the speaker intends to accomplish  by saying it), & Perlocution (what effect has on the hearer). • Conduit Model of Communication Instructions as legal text – communication is believed to be successful as long as  correct text is spoken. Speaker put thoughts into words, meaning is transported to the hearer. Hearer is assumed to take place automatically. • Communication as process Meaning is negotiated between participants and context. Uptake requires feedback and verification. Instruction as communicative act – successful is listener shows understanding. • Types of judges approaches 1) The Strict Adherent to the Law – [Rule Oriented] conduit for inflexible law. Law has to be applied with no regard for the  4 judges own preferences. Law is external force beyond their control. “I have no choice”. 2) The Lawmaker – [In between rule and relationship] Law is what the judge says it is. Decisions may be fair but are extralegal. Sense of fair & justice overrides respect for legal precedent. Manipulate the rules but present decision as a result of these rules. 3) The Authoritative Decision Maker – [Rule Oriented] Emphasizes personal responsibility for decision. Makes no reference to  body of law, judgment extends beyond the dispute to personal  problems/worth of the litigants. Judge as the ruler. 4) The Mediator – [Relationship Oriented] Seeks compromise to avoid future disputes between parties. Conveys subtle  but powerful sense of authority & control. 5) The Proceduralist – [Rule Oriented] Place high priority on maintaining procedural regularity. Invest substantial  time in explaining procedure to litigants; give less attention to substantive  issues. • Linguistic Paranoia The presumption that when co­present persons use a language you cannot  understand, it can only be because whatever is being said is against you.  Questions/Answers   1. Legal Language • How does the use of legal language relate to comprehensibility? 5  The use of technical terms, archaic language, and complex  sentences might hinder the comprehensibility of legal language to  lay person (no legal training).  Use of Plain English and avoid technical terms unless defined, Give jury instructions before and after testimony, Avoid monotone reading – use written and oral instructions (use  visual aids/diagrams if necessary), Allow active participation of jurors in communication. 2. Courtroom Talk/Police Interrogations/Interviews • How are lay participants disadvantaged in courtroom  discourse?  Powerless language – for women and witnesses that that are not in  the position of authority. Seen as less truthful, less  intelligent/competent.  Relationship­orien
More Less

Related notes for LING 2450

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit