Study Guides (248,275)
Canada (121,450)
York University (10,193)
Psychology (1,203)
PSYC 1010 (410)
Midterm

test3-1

5 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 1010
Professor
William Pietro
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 10: Motivation and Emotion Theories of Emotion: James­Lange Theory – Imagine you’re walking in the woods and walk into a bear. This  experience stimulates the whole body (your physiology) into a particular state of fear.  Therefore, his theory suggests that emotions occur as a result of physiological reactions  to events. Cannon­Bard Theory – The Cannon­Bard Theory suggests that emotions cause  physiological reactions. Walter Cannon found holes in the previous theory. He said that it  doesn’t make sense for every single emotion to have a particular biological stage that  would correspond to every emotion (ex. joy vs fear vs perkiness) How can we notice the  difference? He came up with the fight or flight response. In this stage, we have high  adrenaline (epinephrine). He also found that when people were in a state of fighting, they  had norepinephrine (neurotransmitter) in their system – it is a drug that makes you feel  like you can handle the world. He still said that there are major motions like fight, fear,  anger but could there really be different physiological states for each?  Ovid, a Roman poet from 2000 years earlier hinted the start of these theories by giving  pointers on how to make women fall in love with men. He suggested that you take her to  an arena where Christians go against lions and fight. When she experiences a gore feeling  from watching, put your face in front of her so that it seems as though she is experiencing  this physiological arousal from you. Role of Hormones: Two­Factor Theory of Emotion:  ­Schachter and Singer (1962) tell subjects that they’re doing a study on the effect of a  certain drug on a performance task. Half of the participants are given epinephrine  (adrenaline) and half are given placebo. They stay in a room with a participant who  pretends to be drugged by acting really excited or frustrated.  ­Those who are uninformed about what drug it is see the pretender feeling good and start  feeling good. When he is angry, they start feeling angry. Those with placebo experience  no change. Those who are told the truth about the drug are not influenced by the  pretender.  ­This concludes that how you feel depends on an internal and external factor: the  physiological change that happens due to the drug (internal) and the reactions you see  around you (external). Schachter and Singer say that there is an autonomic arousal aka  change (how you feel) and also cognitive interpretation of it (taking in other people’s  perspectives to determine yours).  Howard Becker, an American sociologist, studied marijuana. He found that in the  beginning of the 20  century it got used more and more.  This is the process of how it  went: Drug taken by a novice (an inexperienced user)–> led to a new experience –> led to  errors in action –> This could either result in anxiety attack or a normalized experience  based on what culture they are in. The older culture looks at it as “drug causes insanity”  or “crystallized underlying disorder”. The new drug culture names, explains, and talks  about the drug (normalizes the experience). The Cognitive component (interpretation of experiences/emotions): ­how we feel today depends on what you learn from your culture based on emotions. ­Cognitive Behavioral Theory refers to how you perceive things (is the cup half full or  half empty) The Physiological Component: ­Emotions accompanied by physiological reaction. Lie Detector measures the level of arousal (how much perspiration the body makes, etc) Affective Neuroscience (neuroscience of emotions): ­Emotion depends on activity in a constellation of interacting brain centres. Ex.  Hypothalamus, amygdala, limbic system, prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, mesolimbic  dopamine pathway, left vs right hemispheres. Thalamus sends information to the cortex and amygdala, which gets you to react quickly. The prefrontal cortex processes the meaning of emotional events and voluntary control,  pursuit of goals. This sort of processing may be too slow to react to immediate danger. Amygdala: • ­Part of fast pathway triggering neural activityàautonomic arousal hormonal  response.   The Behavioral Component: Facial­feedback hypothesis asserts that facial muscles send signals to the brain that help  brain recognize emotion that one is experiencing. When you run, smile ! By smiling, it  eases up the tension in your face and gets the brain to enjoy what you’re doing. Motives are: Hypothetical constructs – the why or cause of behavior Goal­directed behavior – you are motivated to do something when you put a lot of effort  towards it Push­Pull Theory – Drive theories (push theories) involve our bodies pushing us into  action.  Incentive Theories (Pull) – an external goal that has the capacity to motivate behavior aka  pull you. The other theory pushes your body whereas this theory pulls you in. Effort­ >Performance, Performance­>Outcome Drive ­ is an i
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit