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Final

MUSI 4 exam.docx

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Department
Music
Course Code
MUSI 2730
Professor
Vinson

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• Blues  Form of vocal and instrumental music to a style of performance  Originated 1890ish  • Sung in rural areas of the south • First was the “country blues” performed with guitar  acmopaniment.  o W.C. Handy  In 1910 blues gained popularity through  o Characteristics of blues  Progression: blues has a particular harmonic sequence.  • Usually 12 bars or measures involving 3 basic chords  o 4ms. Of the I chord, 2ms of IV chord, 2ms of I  chord, 2 ms V chord, 2 ms of I chord  blue botes: bent notes, crdathshadthgs, scoops and slurs produced  by slightly lowering the 3  5  or 7  note of the scale  blue rhythm: singers and instrumentalist play around the beat.  Either just before the beat or right after it.  • Similar to rubato  Text: lyrics that concern unhappy situations  Instrumental blues: not always vocal. o Bessie smith  Empress of the blues was the most famous of 1920s. sold on black  swan label, the first African American recording company o Billie holiday  Known as lady day and discovered in 1933 • Sang clubs in Brooklyn and harlem  • The big band era: swingstyle 1930s and 40s  Swing grew out of Dixieland.  • Bands bigger. 14­20 players  Sax on frontline doubling on clarinet. Second line brass (trumpet  and trombones) rhythm section in back piano, bass, and drums  Played in dancehalls or grand ballrooms and was for dancing  In Dixieland the trumper had the melody in swing the sax often  had the melody o Duke ellington  Big band leader  Composer, arranger, and leader of own band  Remained popular until death  Advent of big bands brought greater need for arranged or written  down music  Take the a train • One of th
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