Study Guides (248,321)
United States (123,322)
Boston College (3,492)
COMM 1010 (44)
All (38)
Midterm

Rhetorical Tradition Exam 1 Study Guide

7 Pages
203 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication
Course
COMM 1010
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
1 O’Leary Rhetorical Tradition Exam 1 Study Guide October 3, 2013 Caleigh O’Leary Definitions of Rhetoric: Single definition perspective  • Theorized by Brian (1953) • Rhetoric is instrumental – it is a tool we use to accomplish stuff • Rhetoric is literary – it is interested in the function of language • Rhetoric is philosophical  ­ it is interested in why we think the things we think • Rhetoric is social – it manages the behavior of humans more so than anything else Systems perspective • Theorized by Ehniger (1968) • Rhetoric is culture and time bound • Classic rhetoric – it is interested in rhetoric originating in Greece and Rome (the  canons of rhetoric) • British rhetoric – it is interested in the audience and how the audience and how  the audience perceives it • Contemporary rhetoric – interested in identification  ▯how we identify with  messages, writers, people who talk to us, etc. Evolutionary perspective • Theorized by James Goldin (1987) • Rhetoric grows and develops based on what was already there Characteristics of Rhetoric: 1. Planned a. Good communication takes effort and thought 2. Involves audience 3. Has motives 4. Responsive a. Addresses or creates a situation 5. Persuades 6. Establishes truth a. Established what we believe to be true 7. Addresses pressing issues Rhetoric Manifests these Characteristics by: • Relying on emotional appeals 2 o Ex. humor, sentiment, guilt • Using famous people o Ex. Betty Whites Snicker’s commercial • Being simple or complex o Zoloft commercial o 1984 Apple commercial Aspects of Rhetoric Actions: • Creates a virtual experience • Explains • Alters perception • Initiates/ maintains action Outcomes: • Ideas are tested  • Advocacy is assisted • Facts are discovered • Knowledge is shaped • Power is distributed • Communities are built Limits: • Intentional and unintentional messages o Ex. Beyoncé music video • Text type o AKA anything that can persuade us is any way  ▯music, dance,  architecture, sports, life Types of Meaning Iconic: • If it looks like the thing it represents Symbolic: • Means the thing it represents only because we as a society agree so Indexical: • The sign is linked to the meaning by cause or association o Ex. Lebron is an index of basketball 3 O’Leary ETHICS Root is “ethos” meaning integrity, honesty, transparent in their dealings Polysemy (many meanings) of ethics Teleological: • Focuses on outcome • The greatest good for the greatest amount of people Deontological: • Interested in rules, codes of ethics, absolutes • Does not matter if the right thing is done in the end, it matters if it followed the  rules Kant’s Categorical Imperative: • You should only do something if it can be made into a universal law “A good rhetor is a good man speaking well”  ­Quintillion  • Problem: “good” is a relative term • Rhetorical training cannot prevent a person from being unethical Ethical Responsibilities as a Rhetor When observing/listening: • Talk about rhetor to create a more active society When enacting rhetoric • Values the audience o Think about how to treat them ethically o Value their character o Think about what you’re saying and how it can possibly improve their  lives • Reflects genuine desire to help the audience actualize its potential and ideals o Display concern, selflessness, involvement Weaver’s Standards Hierarchy of arguments Good ways and bad ways to make arguments 1. Genus/ Definition 4 a. The farther we stray from facts the weaker our arguments become and the  more likely they become unethical 2. Similitude a. Metaphor, analogy, simile, etc. b. Take something that has a definition and make it more understandable 3. Cause and effect a. Straying away from facts and moving towards what­ifs 4. Circumstance a. Relieves us of thinking critically and instead just in the moment b. Leads to foolish and unethical decisions Things that are ethically suspect: • Pseudo­neutrality o All language is preaching something and if we pretend that we aren’t we  are fooling ourselves and the audience • Unwarranted shifts in the meanings of words o Keeps old words but applies new concept  Ex. Shift in meaning of liberalism o Taking w
More Less

Related notes for COMM 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit