Study Guides (248,518)
United States (123,397)
Boston College (3,492)
COMM 1040 (17)
All (12)

COMPLETE Interpersonal Communication Notes (got 4.0 in the course!)

133 Pages
60 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication
Course
COMM 1040
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
CHAPTER 1 WHAT IS INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION? o COMMUNICATION: a process involving the deliberate or accidental transfer of meaning o INTRAPERSONAL COMMUNICATION: when you think or talk to yourself  Requires only 1 communicator o INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION:  An ongoing, ever­changing process  Occurs when you interact with another ▯ must be between 2 people  Forms a dyad= 2 people communicating with one another  Goal= treat and respond to one another as genuine persons, unique individuals (not  objects or roles)  o INTERPERSONAL MEDIATED COMMUNICATION: any person­to­person  interaction where a medium has been interposed to transcend the limitations of time and space ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  RELATIONSHIPS o The more personal a relationship, the more interdependent the people become  Our lives become interconnected o  REWARDS FROM RELATIONSHIPS :  Intrinsic: emotionally, intellectually, perhaps spiritually rewarding  Extrinsic: impersonal, professional working relationships ▯ help us reach our goals  THE EFFECTIVE INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATOR : 1) Does not take others for granted 2) Does not repeat scenarios or scripts that are doomed to fail 3) Does not follow stereotypes 4) Guided by skill and knowledge 5) Works through problems to enhances self­worth ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  INTERPERSONAL COMPETENCE o INTERPERSONAL COMPETENCE: the ability to communicate effectively   Goal= to improve our communication skills in all contexts and across cultures and  generations  o  Effectiveness ▯   depends on our effort in relationships   Must learn effective interpersonal skills – we are not born with them  Skills will change over time, with different situations  Skills will change depending on several factors: • Gender • Environment • Goals • Culture  MODELS OF INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION o 7 KEY ELEMENTS:  1) The people involved  2) The messages that each person sends or receives  3) The channel used  4) Amount of noise present  5) Communication context   6) Feedback sent in response  7) The acts effects on individuals involved ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  1) PEOPLE  Interpersonal communication ranges from “impersonal” to “intimate” •  Impersonal=  limited knowledge of other person or situation •  Intimate=  more knowledgeable of other person and/or situation   Each party in an interpersonal relationship participates in the funcitons of SENDING  and RECEIVING messages  Role duality: each party in a dyad simultaneously performs the roles of sender and  receiver  2) MESSAGES  Message: the content of communication • Are either verbal or nonverbal  Everything we do as a sender or receiver has potential message value: words used,  sounds of one’s voice, facial expressions, posture, touch, appearance, smell  Messages can be conveyed through any of our five senses 3) CHANNEL  CHANNEL: a medium that connects sender and receiver (much as a bridge that  connects two locations)  We use multi­channeled interaction (5 senses) • In addition to face­to­face contact, we also have other channels such as  instant messages, texts, etc 4) NOISE  NOISE: anything that interferes with or impedes our ability to send or receive a  message • Effective communicators find ways to ensure their messages get through  accurately despite any interfering noise   Noise emanates from both internal and external sources: •  Internal sources=  personal toughts and feelings, hunger, shyness, etc •  External sources=  radio or television playing, color of room, etc • Most of us find it easier to cope with external noise than with internal noise  TYPES OF NOISE: 1) Semantic noise: inability to understand meaning of words or context in  which they are used 2) Physiological noise: illness, discomform, or impairment in speech sight,  hearing, or memory 3) Psychological noise: anxiety, confusion, bias, close­mindedness, anger 4) Intellectual noise: information overload or unpreparedness 5) Environmental noise: Distracting sounds, smells, sight, or feel of the  environment or physical space  5) FEEDBACK  FEEDBACK: information we receive in response to messages we have sent • It can be both verbal and nonverbal and lets us know how another person is  responding to us  TYPES OF FEEDBACK •  1) Positive feedback:  enhances behavior in progress •  2) Negative feedback:  steps behavior in progress •  3) Internal feedback:  the feedback you give yourself as you assess your own  performance during an interpersonal transaction •  4) External feedback:  feedback you receive from the other person •  5) Low­monitored feedback:  feedback that is sincere and spontaneous  (without careful planning) •  6) High­Monitored feedback:  carefully crafted response  FEEDFORWARD: a variant of feedback sent prior to a messages delivery as  means of revealing something about to follow • It is a form of phatic communication: superficial interaction designed to  open the channel between individuals  6) CONTEXT  CONTEXT: the setting in which communication takes place • Environmental context:   physical location of interaction • Situational/cultural context:   life space or cultural background of  parties in the dyad 7) EFFECT  EFFECT: the result of the communication episode • One person may feel the effects more than another person  • Emotionally, physically, cognitively VISUALIZING COMMUNICATION o Linear model: a representation of communication that depicts it as going in only one  direction  The earliest model  Instructions, directions, public signs, broadcasts, e­mails, texts, TED talks, YouTube,  Facebook o Interaction model: presence and effect of both feedback and context  The receiver is not involved in actively creating meaning  IM, class presentations  o Transactional Model: a representation of communication that depicts transmission and  reception occurring simultaneously, demonstrating that source and receiver continually  influence one another  Give and take ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  HOW IT ENHANCES OUR LIVES 1) It fulfills psychological functions:  it is good for our well­being  Enhances our self understanding 2) It fulfills social functions:  Need for affection  Need for inclusion  Need for control  Fulfills our need to be friended and to friend others o 3) It fulfills information functions:  as we share information, we reduce the amount of uncertainty in our lives o 4) It fulfills influence functions:  We use interpersonal communication to influence others ▯ sometimes subtly and  sometimes overtly   Often goal directed UNDERSTANDING INTERPERSONAL CONTACT o 5 KEY CHARACTERISTICS:  1)      DYNAMIC PROCESS : is ongoing or continuous • All the components continually interact with and affect each other • They depend on and influence on another 2) UNREPEATABLE:  • Every interpersonal contact is unique • Every contact changes us in some way and can never be exactly repeated or  replicated    3) IRREVERSIBLE:   • Once we have said or don something to another, we cannot erase its impact • Both offline and online   4) LEARNED : • We learn what works for us in an interpersonal relationship and what does not   5) WHOLENESS AND NONSUMMATIVITY  • The whole is more than the sum of its parts  • Interpersonal communication is about more than just its participants per se o we cannot understand a couple by looking at only one­half of the  partnership ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ o INTERPERSONAL PATTERNS  Interpersonal communication involves understanding patterns of behavior, predicting  what others will do and say   Reasoned sense making:  we can understand that individual more than we might  understand our professors or other dates   Retrospective sense making:  making sense of our own behavior once it has occurred ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ o 5 COMMUNICATION AXIOMS: a paradigm of universally accepted principles used for  understanding communication 1) You cannot not communicate 2) Interactions have content and relationship dimensions 3) Interactions are defined by how they are punctuated 4) Messages are verbal symbols and nonverbal cues 5) Exchanges are symmetrical or complementary  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  IMPACT OF DIVERSITY AND CULTURE o CULTURAL AWARENESS: the ability to understand the role that cultural prescriptions  play in shaping communication  Slows our ability to create meaningful interpersonal relationships with people who are  culturally different from us   Learning about other cultures facilitates interpersonal interaction  We must understand the culture if we are to understand the person  o INDIVIDUAL AND COLLECTIVE ORIENTATION:   Individual cultures:  stress individual goals   Collectivistic cultures:  nurture loyalty to a group o HIGH­CONTEXT AND LOW­CONTEXT COMMUNICATION   High­context cultures:  are more tradition­bound and appear to others as overly polite  and indirect   Low­context cultures : are less traditional­bound and more direct and verbally explicit  IMPACT OF GENDER o Gender: a socially constructed role and behavior that the members of a given society believe  to be appropriate for men and women o There are social pressures to:  Accept gender­based social norms  Learn accepted interaction scripts  Develop preferences for different communication styles ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY o Communication differs with different forms of media or technology  The same words convey different messages depending on whether they are sent using  face­to­face interaction, print, a cell phone, a video, or a podcast  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  GAINING COMMUNICATION COMPETENCE 1) Add to your storehouse of knowledge about interpersonal  communication 2) Recognize how your relationships affect you 3) Analyze your options 4) Interact ethically, respect diversity, and think critically about person­ to­perosn contacts 5) Practice and apply skills to improve interpersonal performance  CHAPTER 2 SELF­AWARENESS AND SELF­CONCEPT o You develop self­awareness by reflecting on and monitoring your own behavior o SELF CONCEPT: the relatively stable set of perceptions one attributes to oneself   It I sour most important possession  Everything we think and feel about ourselves   3 TYPES OF SELF CONCEPT : •  1) Perceived self:  our self identity, the image we form of our self •  2) Self­  image:  the mental picure you have of yourself. It is the kind of person  you think you are  •  3) Self­  Esteem : our self­evaluation, our estimation of our self­worthy. An  indication of how much we like and value our selves  SELF SELF CONCEPT Fluid, constantly changing Highly structure, difficult to change Not necessarily part of self­concept Part of ourselves that we invent More to this than is included in self­concept Untapped potential Territory Map that we create SELF ESTEEM o SELF ESTEEM: our positive or negative evaluation of our self­concept or sense of  personal worth  Can nurture and feed success or make succeeding more difficult  Helps us achieve or acquire new competencies  It builds when we: overcome obstacles, acquire specific skills or achievements, or are  given increased responsibilities o   HIGH SELF ESTEEM:    Tend to display different eye contact, posture, and expression  Think better of others  Expect others to like them  Work hard and feel comfortable with others  Defend themselves against negative appraisals   May pose more of a threat to others o   LOW SELF ESTEEM:    Often disapprove of others  Expect others not to like them  Perform poorly in the presence of others  Find it hard to defend themselves against those who view them critically  SHAPING OUR SELF­CONCEPT o Experiences shape our self­concept, and our self­concept shapes our future experiences o Our language, attitude, and appearance tend to change as we change our surroundings and  those we associate with o We adapt to perceived changes o REFLECTED APPRAISAL THEORY: a theory that states that the self a person  presents is in large part based on the ways other categorize the individual, the roles they  expect him or her to play, and the behavior or traits they expect him or her to exhibit  We build a self­concept that reflects how we think others see us    “Looking glass self”=  represent the self that comes to us from significant others o SOCIAL COMPARISON THEORY: a theory affirming that individuals compare  themselves to others to develop a feel for how their talents, abilities, and qualities measure up  As we compare ourselves to others, we form judgments of our skills, personal  characteristics, etc  We are comfortable interacting with those we perceive to be like us  o VIEWS OF SELF:   1) Perceived self:  a reflection of one’s self­concept ▯ the person one believes oneself  to be when one is being honest with oneself   2) Ideal self:  the self one would like to be •  Impression management:  the exercising of one’s behaviors in an effort to  make the desired impression   3) Possible self:  The self that one might become someday   4) Expected self:  The one others assume you will exhibit GOFFMAN’S DRAMATURGICAL APPROACH o DRAMATURGICAL APPROACH: A theory originated by Erving Goffman, explains the  role that the skillful enacting of impression management plays in person­to­person interaction o We use several dramatic elements to make the best impression in any  given scene o  ELEMENTS OF PERFORMANCE:     1) Framing:  defining a scene to make it easy for others to interpret its meaning   2) Scripting:  identification of each actor’s roles   3) Engaging dialogue:  storytelling together with colorful and descriptive language o  CHOICES MADE WHEN PEFORMING     1) Exemplification:  we serve as an example or act as a role model for others   2) Promotion:  we elucidate our personal skills and accomplishments and/or a particular  vision   3) Face­work:  we take steps to protect our image by reducing the negative aspects of  ourselves visible to others   4) Integration:  we employ techniques of agreement to make others believe us to be  more attractive and likable ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  REACTIONS TO YOU o As we interact with others, how we feel about ourselves changes  Those around us help shape our self­concept in both positive and negative ways o  RESPONSE TO OUR SELF­APPRAISALS   Confirmation: supports self­appraisal  Rejection: negates self­appraisal  Disconfirming: Robs the individual of a sense of self. We are not even important  enough to think about SELF­FULFILLING PROPHECY o Optimists: exhibit self­efficacy (positive belief in their abilities, competence, own  possibilities) o Pessimists: believe that, if something can go wrong, it will  o SELF­FULFILLING PROPHECY: occurs when we verbalize a prediction or internalize  an expectation that comes true simply because we act as if it already were  Can be either self­imposed or other­imposed o 5 STEPS IN SELF­FULFILLING CYCLE:  1) We form expectations of ourselves, others, or events  2) We communicate our expectation by exhibiting various cues  3) The individual responds to the cues we send by adjusting their behavior to match  our message  4) The result is that our initial expectation comes true  5) We attain closure ▯ We complete the self­fulfilling prophecy cycle o PYGMALION EFFECT:   Positive Pygmalion’s:  encourage others to achieve by expecting goods things from  them • They create positive expectations within those they affect   Negative Pygmalion’s:  hold low expectations for others • Their low expectations typically result in diminished performance ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  REVISING YOUR SELF CONCEPT 1) Break old ways of thinking 2) Update how you think about yourself 3) Be willing to update and reevaluate o We have a tendency to hold on to our self­concept, and that can be disadvantageous  It may be an unrealistic view  We may view ourselves more harshly than others, or more favorably than others  DIVERSITY AND SELF­CONCEPT o Individualistic cultures: individual identity is paramount, value uniqueness and shun  conformity  o Collectivistic cultures: cultures in which group goals are given a higher priority than  individual goals o Idiocentric orientation: an orientation displayed by people who are primarily  individualistic in their ways of thinking o Allocentric orientation:  A perspective displayed by people who are primarily  collectivistic in their thinking and behaving  o High context cultures: use an indirect communication style, rely on nonverbal cues,  value silence and reticence   Comparable to collectivistic cultures o Low context cultures: prefer a direct communication style, give priority to discovery and  expression of individual uniqueness   Comparable to individualistic cultures o Power distance: extent to which people are willing to accept power differentials  GENDER & SELF CONCEPT o SEX: biological characteristics defining males and females o GENDER: socially constructed roles and behaviors that society places on male and females o GENDER IDENTITY: an inner sense of being male or female ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY o Media depictions help us asses what the general public’s preferred patterns of behavior and  appearance are  Many messages we receive are often distorted and affect how we see ourselves  o Make­believe­media: media offerings that make us believe things that are not necessarily  true  What we should be like, what our relationships should be like, what we should look  like, how women are portrayed, etc o TECHNOLOGY:  Fosters multiple identities  Can give a psychological boost to one’s self­esteem ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  STRENGTHEN SELF­CONCEPT o Our “snapshot” is a figurative view of who we think we are:  Update pictures  Take multiple pictures (watch yourself in action)  Explore others’ pictures of you  Picture possibilities (flexible, changeable) CHAPTER 3 PERCEPTION IN ACTION o PERCEPTION: the process used to make sense of experience   A consequence of who we are, where we are, and what we choose to see o Uncertainty reduction theory: we monitor the social environment to learn more about  each other  o Through perception, we give meaning to the world, making it our own  We actively select or choose to focus on relatively few stimuli  We organize or give order to the stimuli  We interpret sensory data or explain what we have selected and organized  We remember what we have observed  We respond  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  PERCEPTION IN ACTION (CONT) o SELECTION:  We attend only a limited number of stimuli from an array of random competing stimuli  at one time, therefore we choose which persons, situations, or events to perceive    Selective perception:  the aspect of perception in which we see, hear, and believe only  what we want to •  Selective exposure:  our preference for people and messages that confirm our  existing beliefs and values •  Selective attention:  the means by which we focus on certain cues but ignore  others •  Selective retention:  the practice by which we recall things that reinforce our  thinking and forget things we find objectionable •  Horn effect:  we perceive or remember only someone’s flaws •  Halo effect:  we notice only positives about someone we life o ORGANIZATION:   Figure­ground principle:  A strategy that facilitates that organization of stimuli by  enabling one to focus on different stimuli alternately • We chose to focus on “figure” • The rest recedes into the background, or “ground”   Closure : the process by which one fills in a missing perceptual piece   Perceptual constancy:    the tendency we have to maintain the same perception of  stimuli over time •  Schemata ;   the mental templates or knowledge structures that individuals carry  with them •  Scripts:  the general ideas that individuals have about persons and situations  and how things should play out  • These can contribute to stereotyping o Can lead us to see what isn’t there and overlook what is o EVALUATION AND INTERPRETATION:   Affectors:  factors that color responses to stimuli • Include: culture, roles, biases, emotional state, past experiences, physical  limitations, and capabilities  Other influences: • Degree of involvement we have or expect to have with someone • Knowledge we have about them • Our feelings about ourselves in relation to them • The assumptions we make about behavior in general and this person’s in  particular o MEMORY   Human construct:  composite of what we read, piece together, experience, and/or want  to be true  We attempt to reconstruct a memory at the time of withdrawal  We infer about past occurrences based on who we are and what we know now  We tend to recall information consistent with our schemata and forget what isn’t o RESPONSE  Perception is a micture of external stimuli and an internal state  We participate in the process by controlling our responses to stimuli • How we make sense of the world and relate to others   Attribution theory:  helps us understand why we respond as we do to persons and  events • It shows that we like to be able to explain why others behave as they do • We assign meaning to the behavior of others by ascribing motives and causes  for their actions    4 PRINCIPLES ▯   guide us in attributing behavior •  1) Consensus= focus on commonalities of behavior •  2) Consistency=  focus on repeated behavior •  3) Distinctiveness=  similar behavior in different situations •  4) Controllability=  whether the behavior is under his or her control   RESPONSE ERRORS : •  Fundamental attribution error:  assumption that primary motivation for behavior  is in the person, not the person’s situation •  Self­serving bias:  the overemphasizing of external factors as influences on  one’s behaviors o Raises our self esteem o We take credit for positives and attribute negative to external factors •  Overattribution:  to attribute ALL someone does to a few specific characteristics  FRAMEWORKS OF PERCEPTION o The mental templates and life experiences we bring to any situation strongly affect how we  process experience and relate to others:  Schemata  Perceptual sets and selectivities  Ethnocentrism and stereotypes  o SCHEMATA: the mental templates of characteristics that influence our notions or ideas  about other people   Physical constructs:  classify people according to characteresitics (age, weight, height)   Interaction constructs:    social behavior cues (friendly, arrogant, etc)   Role constructs :   social position (professors, students, administrators)   Psychological constructs:    lead us to classify people according to such things as their  generosity, insecurity, sense of humor, etc o PERCEPTUAL SETS AND SELECTIVITIES: organizational constructions that  condition a readiness to perceive, or a tendency to interpret stimuli in ways to which one has  been conditioned  We organize stimuli we perceive in set ways, helping us to construct our social reality  Factors that influence perceptual sets include: education, culture, motivation/internal  state o ETHNOCENTRISM AND STEREOTYPES:   Ethnocentrism: the tendency to perceive what is right or wrong, good or bad,  according to the categories and values of our own culture • Perceive right/wrong based on categories and values in own culture (narrows  our perception)  Stereotypes: rigid perceptions that are applied to all members of a group or to an  individual over a period of time, regardless of individual variations   Perceptual shortcuts: the kinds of perception exhibited by lazy perceives who  rely on stereotype sto help them make sense of experience  Racial profiling: A form of stereotyping attributed to racism  BARRIERS TO ACCURATE PERCEPTION 1) AGE AND PERSON PERCEPTION:    Category­based processing:  the processing of information about a person that is  influenced by attitudes toward the group into which the person is placed   Person­based processing:  the processing of information about a person based on  perceptions of the individual, not on his or her membership in a particular group 2) FACT­INFERENCE CONFUSIONS: the tendency to treat observations and  assumptions similarly 3) ALLNESS: thinking that we know all there is to know about a person, place, or situation  (know it all) 4) INDISCRIMINATION: a perceptual barrier that causes one to emphasize similarities  and neglect differences 5) FROZEN EVALUATIONS AND SNAP JUDGEMENTS:    Frozen evaluation:  A perceptual fallacy that discourages flexibility and encourages  rigidly • An evaluation of a person that ignores challenges   Snap judgment:  An evaluation made without reflection • An undelayed reaction ▯ jumping to conclusions  6) BLINDERING: The unconscious adding of restrictions that do not actually exist  Forcing ourselves to see people and situations only in certain ways, as though we are  wearing blinders  Keeps us from seeing who or what is really before our eyes 7) JUDING OTHERS MORE HARSHLY THAN OURSELVES DIVERSITY AND CULTURE o PERCEPTUAL CONSTANCY: tendency to see things as we always have instead of  revising our perceptions o The more similar our life experiences, the more similarly we perceive them o Members of each culture develop particular perspectives o We all process events differently yet culture teaches us a WORLD VIEW, influencing our  assessments of reality o Race also influences perception  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­GENDER ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  AND PERCEPTION o Men and women are conditioned differently:  Often perceive different realities, encouraged to perform in different ways, prefer to use  different communication styles, beliefs in gender­appropriate behavior influence how  we relate to one another o We follow others expectations, role model behavior, and stereotypes reinforce “acceptable”  images of behavior o GENDER PRESCRIPTIONS: the roles and behaviors that a culture assigns to males  and females ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­MEDIA  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  AND PERCEPTION o Stereotypes in media influence our expectations and relationships:  Help us identify/generalize appropriate behavior  Provide us with perceptual shortcuts o LESSONS WE LEARN:  Males matter more than females and older people  We internalize stereotypical portrayals of gender  Media leads us to inaccurate perceptions about minorities  Media mold our conceptions of the real world and people in ways inconsistent with  facts TECHNOLOGY AND PERCEPTION o Technology alters perception and self­perception  Video games increases aggressive behavior  But they enhance ability to pay attention to objects and changes in one’s environment  And they improve attention skills o SOCIAL IDENTITY MODEL OF DE­INDIVIDUATION EFFECTS: A theory that  states that each individual ahs different identities that make themselves visible in different  situations  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  GAINING COMMUNICATION COMPETENCE 1) RECOGNIZE THE PART YOU PLAY 2) BE A PATIENT PERCEIVER 3) BECOME A PERCEPTION CHECKER 4) WIDEN YOUR PERCEPTION 5) SEE THORUGH THE EYES OF ANOTHER 6) BUILD PERCEPTUAL BRIDGES, NOT WALLS 6) CONSIDER HOW TECHNOLOGY IS CHANGING HOW WE PERCEIVE CHAPTER 4 LISTENING IN YOUR LIFE o On average, a college student will spend over 50% of a day listening   An employee spends over 60% of a day listening o We only process HALF of what we hear  Understand ¼ of it  And retain even less of the content  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  HEARING vs. LISTENING  o HEARING: an involuntary physiological response in which sound waves are transformed  into electrical impulses and processed by the brain  o LISTENING: a voluntary psychological process   Consisting of: • Sensing • Attending/understanding • Interpreting • Evaluating • Responding • And remembering   We often hear others instead of “listening” to them  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  EFFECTIVE vs. INNEFFECTIVE LISTENERS: o EFFECTIVE LISTENENING ENHANCES OUR RELATIONSHIPS:   1) Decreases stress    2) Increases knowledge:  learn more about each other   3) Builds trust:  we pay closer attention to those who do the same for us and avoid  those who don't   4) Improves analysis and decision making:  we make better judgment   5) Increases confidence  o INNEFECTIVE LISTENINERS: destroy relationships HURIER model o HURIER model: a model of listening developed by listening expert Judi Brownwell   Suggests the listening is a system of interrelated components that includes both  mental processes and observable behaviors  Focuses on six aspects:  • Hearing • Understanding • Remembering • Interpreting • Evaluating • Responding ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  Stage 1: HEARING   Sounds surround us, but we choose to pay attention only to the ones that interest us   Eugene Raudsepp = “listen to the cricket”   ATTENDING: paying attention ▯ the willingness to organize and focus on particular  stimuli • If we attend to a sound, we concentrate on it  • If the sound doesn’t hold our attention, we will refocus on something else ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  Stage 2: UNDERSTANDING   We absorb the meaning of a person’s statement or sound  We work to decode what is being said using our own reservoir of information  To understand why, we may: • 1) Reply to the person • 2) Ask questions • 3) Rephrase or paraphrase what we heard  Stage 3: REMEMBERING  Our brain assigns meaning to spoken words  We decide what has value and what is worth remembering  Memory allows us to retain and recall info • Forgetting is necessary for our mental health was well   SHORT­TERM MEMORY:  • Where we store most of what we hear • If not used continually, we will forget it  • We remember 50% of a message immediately after listening to it o We remember 25% after a brief time lapse   LONG­TERM MEMORY  • Connects new experiences to previous images and information • We remember events of significance (birthdays, anniversaries, etc) ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  Stage 4: INTERPRETING  We attempt to make sense of a message  We consider the message from the sender’s perspective  By doing so, we try not to impose our OWN beliefs onto the other person’s message  We interpret by listening to both verbal AND nonverbal cues ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  Stage 5: EVALUATING  We weigh the worth of a and critically analyze what we have been told  We make choices:  • Separate facts from inferences • Weigh evidence • Identify prejudices and faulty arguments  When we don’t make wise choices, we risk evaluating a message incorrectly  Stage 6: RESPONDING  When we respond to someone, we react and provide feedback  We communicate our thoughts and feelings about the received message  We are, in effect, the sender’s “radar”  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  STYLES OF LISTENING 1) PEOPLE ORIENTED:   Preferred by those who focus on emotions and interests of others  Fosters relating to others in meaningful ways 2) ACTION ORIENTED:   Preferred by those who value clarity and precision  Do not like to feel frustrated, want person to be direct with them 3) CONTENT ORIENTED:   Preferred by those who enjoy intellectual challenges  Like to work ideas through practice and content­oriented style  Spark debate  4) TIME ORIENTED:   Expect speaker to get the point  Are impatient and efficient TYPES OF LISTENING 1) APPRECIATIVE: help us unwind or escape 2) COMPREHENSIVE: listening engaged in to gain knowledge  Primary purpose is to learn 3) CRITICAL/DELIBERATIVE: listening that involves working to understand analyze,  and assess content  Help us accept or reject it  4) EMPATHETIC: when one reaches out to us for support, he/she needs us to listen with  empathy   Empathy:  the ability to understand another’s thoughts and feelings and to  communicate that understanding to the person  • The ability to comprehend another’s point of view    Empathetic listening:  listening that involves understanding and internalizing the  emotional content of a message • It holds a therapeutic function ▯ facilitates problem solving  • Goal is to understand the other person’s thoughts and feelings   Empathetic responsiveness:  a listener’s experiencing of an emotional response that  corresponds with the emotions a speaker is experiencing    Perspective taking:  we place ourselves in the shoes of the other person (adopt the  viewpoint of another person    Sympathetic responsiveness:  feeling for, rather than with another  LISTENING ETHICS  Nonlistening: a kind of deficient listening behavior in which the receiver tunes out • Ethical listeners do NOT engage in this   QUESTIONS: 1) Do you tune out?  o Too busy thinking about own problems or something else o Result= fail to focus fully or actively  2) Do you fake attention? o All external cues tell you that they are listening, but they are only  pretending to listen 3) Do you ignore specific individuals? o Ineffective listeners’ tendency to prejudge limits their potential for  developing meaningful relationships 4) Do you lose emotional control? o Sometimes we let disagreements with another person get in the way  of our listening o Red flag words: a word that triggers emotional deafness in the  receiver 5) Do you avoid challenging content? o Believing that we will not understand the other person 6) Are you egocentric? 7) Do you waste potential listening time? o Speech­though differential: the difference between the rate of  speech and the rate at which speech can be comprehended 8) Are you overly apprehensive?  o Fearful of processing or psychologically adjusting themselves to  messages that others send them 9) Are you having listening burnout?  o Exposed to too much information­ info overload  HURDLING LISTNEING ROADBLOCKS 1) Listening requires full attention 2) Evaluation FOLLOWS, does not precede 3) The Other person’s appearance or delivery is not an excuse for not  listening 4) Do not judge someone based on your own prejudices 5) How you listen affects how others feel about you 6) If you practice, you will become a better listener ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  FEEDBACK: we are returning or “feeding back” to  another person our reactions o IMMEDIATE OR DELAYED:   Much of the feedback we send during interpersonal communication is immediate   Immediate feedback:  is the most effective because our reaction can lose impact if we  wait too long   Technology is beginning to influence how quickly feedback occurs in an array of  settings  o PERSON OR MESSAGE FOCUSED o LOW OR HIGH MONITORED:   Low monitored:  sincere and spontaneous   High monitored : careful planning to serve a specific purpose  o EVALUATIVE OR NONEVALUATIVE   Evaluative feedback:   f eedback that reveals one’s feelings or reactions to what one  heard – providing a positive or negative assessment • Positive evaluative feedback= keeps people and their communicative  behaviors moving in the direction in which they are already heading  • Negative evaluative feedback= serves a corrective function because it helps  reduce undesirable behavior    Nonevaluative feedback:  feedback that is nonjudgmental • Probing= a nonevaluative technique in which one solicits additional information  from another  • Understanding= an alternative kind of nonevaluative reaction. When we offer  understanding, we try to comprehend what the other person is telling us, and  we check interpretations by paraphrasing • Supportive feedback= do your best to calm someone down by assuring them  that you understand the problem  • “I” Messages= reveal a speaker’s feelings about the situation faced by another  person  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  CULTURE’S INFLUENCE o Dialogue listening: listening that involves give­and­take between persons interacting as  they cocreate a relationship  Differs from culture to culture  o Cultures attitudes toward when it is appropriate to talk/ when one should remain silent also play  roles  Silence: the absence of vocal communication  Eastern cultures view silence as signaling respectability and trust  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  GENDER’S INFLUENCE MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY  Television shows and other forms of media shortern our attention spans  With our use of technology (texting and internet), we “listen more visually”  rather than aurally  We tend to multitask when listening, so we do not solely focus on any message  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  GAINING COMMUNICAITON COMPETENCE TO BECOME  A BETTER LISTENER 1) Catch yourself exhibiting a bad habit 2) Substituted a good habit for a bad habit 3) Listen with your whole body  4) Consistently use your eyes, not JUST your moth 5) See the other side 6) Don’t listen assumptively 7) Participate actively  CHAPTER 5 DEFINING LANGUAGE o LANGUAGE: a code or system of arbitrary symbols shared by a group and used by its  members to communicate with each other   Used to negotiate meaning  Exists in PEOPLE, not words o THE MEANING OF WORDS:   Semantic code=  the agreement to use the same symbols to communicate • Vary through time and place • Without this code, we would be unable to communicate in meaningful ways    Syntactic code=  establishes the conventions that guide our word use • Is violated when we ignore grammatical rules • Impressions of people may be negatively affected if errors are made    Pragmatic code=  the agreement to consider the context of an interaction, the  interdependent nature of the relationship, and the goal of the exchange in deciphering  meaning  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  TRIANGLE OF MEANING o Triangle of meaning: a model that demonstrates the relationships that exist among  words, things, and thoughts   By Ogden and Richards  Reminds us that the word is not the thing, and that there is no direct connection  between these two points on the triangle   Meanings exist in THOUGHTS,  not in words or things  o Word masks: ambiguous language meant to confuse SEMANTIC BARRIERS o Word wall: language that impedes understanding o DENOTATIVE vs. CONNOTATIVE MEANING   Denotative=  its standard dictionary definition   Connotative=  subject meaning­ personal meaning o Need to recognize how TIME and PLACE change meaning  Interacting with someone older or younger  Can change by geographic region  The meanings that words trigger in people’s mind may change with time  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  CONSIDER THE EFFECT OF YOUR WORDS o EUPHEMISMS AND LINGUISTIC AMBIGUITY   Euphemisms=  less direct or inoffensive language substituted for blunt language   Obscure or fog meaning   Linguistic ambiguity:  purposely saying something that can be taken in at least 2  different ways to avoid confrontation • “Linguistic fraud and deception” o Camouflage the truth  o William Lutz  o EMOTIVE LANGUAGE: language that announces the user’s attitude toward a subject  Expresses the user’s opinion of the behavior  o POLARIZING LANGUAGE: language that describes experience in either­or terms  o POLITICALLY CORRECT LANGUGE o BYPASSING: occurs when individuals think they understand each other but actually miss  each other’s meanings   Both are using equivocal language (words that may be interpreted in more than one  way)   2 types :    1) People are unaware that they are talking about the same thing because  they are using different words or phrases 2) Occurs when our words suggest we and another person are in agreement  when in fact we substantially disagree o LABELS:  Can obscure reality   Intentional orientation:  The type of orientation displayed when one responds to a label  rather than to what the label actually represents • Easily fooled by words and labels    Extensional orientation:  the type of orientation one displays when not blinded by labels • “Show me”, reality based  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  WORDS AND RELATIONSHIPS  o SNARL WORDS: words that register social disapproval o PURR WORDS: words that register social approval  o COMMUICATION ACCOMODATION THEORY: a theory that assets that we adjust  our language patters to reflect hwo we feel about another person   Communication convergence:  matching the vocabulary, speaking rate, and use of  pauses as part of building a relationship   Communication divergence:  the purposeful adoption of a style of speaking that  contrasts with the style of speaking of a person from whom one desires to distance  oneself  CULTURESPEAK o SAPIR­WHORF HYPOTHESIS: a theory that proposed that language influences  perception by revealing and reflecting one’s worldview  Language is determined by the perceived reality of a culture    Linguistic determinism=  language the view that language shapes thinking   Linguistic relativity=  the view that languages contain unique embedded elements • Language influences both human though and meaning   Non­believers=  believe that language does not influence thought  o CO­CULTURES: groups who share a culture within a society but outside its dominant  culture   Dominant culture:  the culture that has the most power   Argot : the language used by members of a coculture  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  GENDERSPEAK AND AGE o Language can diminish/ stereotype men and women   Spotlighting:  the highlighting of a person’s sex for emphasis o Language practices of men and women reflect goals and feelings about  POWER   Genderlects:  Deborah Tannen’s term for language differences attributed to Gender ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  LANGUAGE AND MEDIA: o MEDIA COVERAGE OF WOMEN:  Stress physical appearance ­Hair, dress, weight, physical appeal  Stories about women often appear in “lifestyle” sections  Marital, familial status o MEDIA COVERAGE OF MEN:  Stress accomplishments  Societal judgments ▯ men’s roles are normalize TECHNOLOGY o Online, we predominantly use words and pictures to express ourselves  The way we use those WORDS and the stories we tell about ourselves determine our  identities in cyberspace  o We are apt to share our thoughts and feelings more online, with less thought for others  thoughts and feelings  We are often more likely to talk about one another instead of with one another  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  COMMUNICATION COMPETENCE 1) ARE MY WORDS CLEAR? 2) ARE MY WORDS APPROPRIATE? 3) AM I USING WORDS THAT ARE CONCRETE? 4) DO MY WORDS SPEAK TO THE OTHER PERSON AND RELFLECT  THE CONTEXT? 5) DO I SHARE “TO ME” MEANING 6) DO I RESPECT UNIQUENESS 7) DO I LOOK FOR GROWTH? CHAPTER 6 NONVERBAL CUES: o NONVERBAL COMMUNICAITON: Communication that does not include words  Messages are expressed by nonlinguistic means  Actions or attributes of humans  Whether deliberate or accidental, their meaning depends on how they are interpreted o METACOMUNICATIVE FUNCITONS: Communication about communication   Clarify both the nature of our relationship and/or the meaning of our verbal message  2/3 of a message’s communicative value is through nonverbal messages   Amount of information conveyed depends on clarity of message, receptivity, and  perception of receiver ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  FUNCTIONS OF NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION 1) CONTRADICTING: what is said and what is done are at odds  Each interaction represents a double message (the message that is communicated  when words say one thing and nonverbal cues another) 2) EMPHASIZING: using nonverbal cues to accentuate your words 3) REGULATING: behavior influences the flow of verbal interaction  4) COMPLEMENTING: nonverbal messages provide clues to the relationship you share  with someone or what you aim to do  5) SUBSTITUTING: take place of spoken words  CHARACTERISTICS OF NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION 1) ALL NONVERBAL COMM HAS MESSAGE VALUE:   It is impossible for us to stop behaving, whether intention or unintentional  You cannot stop sending nonverbal messages 2) NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION IS AMBIGUOUS  Others can evaluate them in different ways  What we communicate may be ambiguous and subject to misinterpretation  3) NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION IS PREDOMINANTLY RELATIONAL:  Sometimes we are unaware of the nonverbal cues we send, as a result, we  inadvertently reveal info we would rather conceal 4) NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR MAY REVEAL DECEPTION  When a person says one thing but means another, we can use our deception detection  skills to determine that the person’s behavior contradicts his/her words  Researchers advise that you believe nonverbal cues    INTERPERSONAL DECEPTION THEORY:  a theory that explains deception as a  process based on falsification, concealment, or equivocation o By Buller and Burgoon o We only have a 60% change of being able to identify when someone  is lying to us    FACIAL ACTION CODING SYSTEM:  A virtual taxonomy of more than 3,000 facial  expressions used to interpret emotions and detect deception  • By Ekman and Friesen • Our face can make 43 muscular movements • Used to interpret emotions and detect deception  READING NONVERBAL MESSAGES o VISUAL/KINESIC o VOCAB/PARALINGUISTIC o PROXEMIC o HAPTICS o THOSE PROVIDED VIA ARTIFACTS AND APPEARANCE o OLFACTORY o COLOR o CHRONEMICS ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  KINESICS: the study of human body motion o Includes variables such as facial expression, eye moment, gestures, posture, and walking  speed o The Face: the main channel we use to decipher the feelings of  Others. It is the prime communicator of emotion o The Eyes: we use our eyes to establish, maintain, and terminate contact  According to Richard Bandler and John Grinder= a relationship exists between eye  movements and thoughts or cognitive processing  You can use eye movements to determine hwo truthful a person is  o The Ethics of Face­Work:   REPRESENTATIONAL FACIAL EXPRESSIONS=  exhibited facial expressions that  communicate genuine inner feelings   PRESENTATIONAL FACIAL EXPRESSIONS=  facial expressions that are consciously  controlled   MICROFACIAL/MICROMENTARY EXPRESSION : An expression lasting no more than  1/8 to 1/5 of a second that usually occurs when an individual consciously or  unconsciously attempts to disguise    MOBIUS SYMDROME : the total lack of the physical ability to smile • Makes it difficult for individuals to experience normal interpersonal  relationships  o Gestures and posture: body in motion and at rest  CATEGORIES:  •  1) Emblems=  deliberate movements of the body that are consciously sent and  easily translated into speech •  2) Illustrators=  bodily cues designed to enhance receiver comprehension of  speech by supporting or reinforcing it •  3) Regulators=  communication cues intentionally used to influence turn taking  and to control the flow of conversation  •  4) Affect displays=  unintentional movements of the body that reflect emotional  states of being •  5) Adaptors=  unintentional movements of the body that reveal information  about psychological state or inner needs, such as nervousness  o Nose scratches, hand over lips, chin stroking, hair twirling o Decoding the Body’s Messages  Do individuals like or dislike one another?  Is a person being assertive or nonassertive?  Is an individual powerful or powerless? ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  PARALANGUAGE: message sent using only vocal cues o TONE OF VOICE: can help you communicate what you mean to convey, or it can reveal  thoughts you mean to conceal o PITCH: highness or lowness of voice o VOLUME: power, loudness o RATE: most of us speak at an average rate of 150 words per minute  When we exceed 275­300 words pm, it is difficult for others to comprehend what we  are saying o ARTICULATION AND PRONUNCIATION: how you say sounds and words    Articulation=  how individual words are pronounces   Pronunciation=  the conventional treatment of the sounds of a word  o HESITATIONS AND SILENCE:    Nonfluencies:  hesitation phenomena­ nonlinguistic verbalizations  These disrupt the flow of speech and adversely affect how others perceive your  competence and confidence  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  PROXEMICS: “proximity” that influences human interaction o FATHER of proxemics= Edward T. Hall o Our use of space and distance reveals how we feel about ourselves and what we think of  others  We use physical proximity and distance to signal either desire to communicate or  disinterest in communicating o SPACIAL RELATIONSHIPS:   1) Intimate distance=  ranges from skin contact to 18 inches from another person   2) Personal distance=  ranges from 17 inches to 4 feet • Less proximate or personal • Used in social events   3) Social distance=  extends from 4 feet to 12 feet • We are less apt to talk about personal matters, more able to keep another at  arm’s length, and thus more likely to conduct business or discuss issues that  are neither rprivate nor of a personal nature   4) Public distance= t he distance we use to remove ourselves physically from  interaction, to communicate with strangers, or to address large groups • Expectancy violation theory= a theory that addresses our reactions  to nonverbal behavior and notes that violations of nonverbal communication  norms can be positive or negative  o PLACES AND THEIR SPACES  ▯ DECODING ENVIRONMENT   Fixed feature space=  involves the permanent characteristics of an environment • Walls, doors, built­in cabinets, windows, etc   Semi­fixed feature space=  uses movable objects such as furniture, plants, temporary,  walls to promote or inhibit interaction   Informal space or non­fixed feature space=  is the space we carry out around with us • It is invisible, highly mobile, and enlarged or contracted at will as we try to  keep individuals at a distance or bring them closer  o TERRITORIALITY: the claiming or identifying of space as one’s own  Can use marks or not to claim  High­status people claim privileged spaces  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  HAPTICS: study of how touch communicates  o Amount of touching that is acceptable is often culturally driven o  Touch is used for many purposes   Communicate attitude or affect  Encourage affiliation  Exert control or power • The person who initiates touch is the one who usually controls or directs the  interaction o Touch is part of relationship development and a gauge of how much intimacy is desired ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  ARTIFICIAL COMMUNICATION AND APPEARANCE o What we wear and how we look o We perceive these to indicate status or power o We live in a culture that rewards good looks (height, thinness, attractiveness) o What we wear affects our cognitive processes (both how others see us and how we think about  ourselves) ▯  EMBODIED COGNITION OLFACTICS: the study of the sense of smell o The desire to use and appeal to the sense of smell o Americans mask their natural bodily odors, preferring to use small as an attractor  Trigger emotional reactions, sexual arousal, romance, or friendship o SMELL= recall of good and bad memories  A la Proust ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  COLOR o COLOR talks both to us and about us o Colors are behavioral conditioners to many companies  Fast food chains, department stores, etc o Color meanings are NOT always the same across culture    WHITE=  In US it is acceptable for brides to wear white but in Asian countries this color  means mourning   YELLOW=  In US yellow means cowardice or caution, In China it means wealth or the  “golden mean” ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  CHRONEMICS: the study of how we use time to communicate o How our use of time has message value  Whether we are early, punctual or late  Whether we approach life with urgency or at a relaxed pace  Whether we are early birds or night owlds o STATUS= afford us greater power to control our own time and that of others o CULTURE= influences how we “see” time”  CULTURE & NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR o Our culture modifies our use of nonverbal cues o CONTACT CULTURES: Cultures that encourage nonverbal displays of warmth,  closeness, and availability  Seek maximum sensory experience o NON­CONTACT CULTURES: Cultures that discourage the use of nonverbal displays of  warmth, closeness, and availability  More likely to discourage intimacy ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  GENDER & NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR o Preferred styles of men and women tend to reflect gendered patterns o   GENERALLY:     Men= assertive behaviors, demonstrate power and authority, talk more, interrupt  more than women • More interested in establishes strength of idea, suppress facial expressions  Women= more reactive and responsive behavior • Smile more, display feelings more overtly, exhibit higher levels of involvement  during person­to­person interaction o VISUAL DOMINANCE RATIO: A figure derived by comparing the percentage of looking  while speaking with the percentage of looking while listening  Ratio is higher for men o Space & Touch: men usually assert dominance over women  Women are usually recipients of touch  o *MEDIA ARE STRONG REINFORCERS OF STEREOTYPICAL MORALES AND BEHAVIORS COMPETENCE IN NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION 1) Pay attention to nonverbal messages 2) When uncertain about a nonverbal cue, ASK! 3) Realize inconsistent messages have communicative value 4) Match the degree of closeness you seek with the nonverbal behavior  you display 5) Monitor nonverbal behavior 6) Acknowledge the ability to encode and decode nonverbal messages  CHAPTER 7 THE IMPORTANCE OF CONVERSATIONAL CONTACT o SMALL TALK: spontaneous conversation that lays the foundation for an interpersonal  relationship  Comes naturally to some but not to others o Talking to others lays the foundation for most of our interpersonal relationship  One of the most important skills we can master is that of carrying on a good  conversation o Conversation deprivation: a lack of aural communication  Think about jail and the “Hanoi Hilton” grid  o A good conversationalist is adept at:  1) Approaching other  2) Starting a conversation  3) Listening  4) Changing a topic to one of interest or importance  5) Gracefully ending the interaction  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  WHAT IS CONVERSATION? o CONVERSATION: A relatively informal social interaction in which the roles of speaker and  listener are exchanged in a nonautomatic fashion under the collaborative management of all  parties   Participants determine the timeframe o CONVERSATIONAL RULES: reveal the behaviors we prefer and would like to prohibit  in various social situations  Conversations are a kind of game that we can therefore apply the same rules we use  when playing a game (Nofsinger)  STRUCTURE OF A CONVERSATION 1) Greeting 2) Topic Priming 3) The heart of the conversation 4) Preliminary processing  5) The closing  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  STAGE 1: THE GREETING  PHATIC COMMUNICATION: a message that opens up the communication  channel, thereby enabling two people to begin interacting  GREETING: a routine way to begin/ initiate converaiton  3 CATEGORIES (T.E. Murray):   1) Questions (How are you?) 2) Advertisements (My name is…) 3) Compliments (I like your shirt)  3 TYPES OF OPENERS:   • 1) Cute/flippant (Is that really your hair? • 2) Innocuous (What do you think of the band?) • 3) Direct (Since were both eating alone, wanna join?)  Each of these relies on a QUESTION ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  STAGE 2: TOPIC PRIMING  We PRIME a conversation by keeping the communication channels between us open  and previewing for the other person what the topic or focus of our convo will be • Prepares the person we are conversing with for what is to follow  3 KINDS OF TOPICS GENERALLY DISCUSSED=  • Ourselves • Other person • Particular situation  OPEN­ENDED QUESTIONS: a question that allows the respondent free rein in  answering  CLOSE­ENDED QUESTIONS: a question that forces the respondent to choose  a specific response    Gregory Stock=  notes that far too frequently we exchange small talk without becoming  involved in deeper convos  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  STAGE 3: HEART OF CONVERSATION  Where we find FOCUS or GOAL of conversation  Whatever our specific goal, in this part of our conversation we get to the heart of the  matter  Conversational maintenance skills: preservation of the smooth and natural  flow of conversation  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  STAGE 4: PRELIMINARY PROCESSING  Flip side of topic priming • Instead of preparing the other person for what is to come we process what has  just occurred between us  We may feel that we have accomplished our conversational purpose • If not, we may need to step back and retrace our conversational steps  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  STAGE 5: THE CLOSING  Reverse of the greeting  Good closing serves 3 functions (MARK KNAPP): • 1) Lets other person know convo is ending • 2) Supportive in tone – lets expressions of appreciation and desire to renew  contact • 3) Summarizes the main topics  MANAGING A CONVERSATION o CONVERSATIONAL TURN TAKING: The altering of speaking and listening during  conversation as each takes a speaking turn, cooperating and engaging in dialogue to fulfill the  conversation’s purpose  o  Behaviors the promote conversational dialogue:   1) Turn­maintaining signals: paralinguistic and kinesics cues that suggest that  a speaker is not yet ready to give up the speaking role • May involve “umm”, “uhh”, inhaled breathe, etc • Avoidance of eye contact  2) Turn yielding signals: Paralinguistic and kinesics cues that indicate the  readiness of a speaker to exchange the role of speaker for the role of listener • Direct eye contact, drop in pitch, nod, remain silent 3) Turn­requesting signals: Paralinguistic and kinesic cues that signal  reluctance to switching speaking/listening roles • Opening one’s mouth, leaning forward, gesturing for attention  4) Turn­denying signals: Paralinguistic and kinesic cues that signal a  reluctance to switch speaking and/or listening roles  • Avoid eye contact, shake head, keep taking notes, gesture, etc  5) Backchannel signals: verbalizations one uses to tell another person that one  is listening  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  THE COOPERATION PRINCIPLE o COOPERATION PRINCIPLE: Conversations are most satisfying when the comments of  the conversation partners are consistent with the conversation’s purpose o CONVERATIONAL MAXIMS (UNITED STATES)   Quality maxim : persons engaged in conversation should not offer a comment if they  know it to be false   Quantity maxim:  neither too little nor too much   Relevancy maxim : asks that we not go off on tangents or purposefully digress and  switch subjects    Manner maxim : the premise that when conversing one should use diction that is  appropriate to the receiver and the interaction’s context  o OTHER MAXIMS:    Maxim of face­saving:  avoiding contracting, embarrassing, correcting   Maxim of politeness:  avoiding self­praise, focusing on others instead  ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­  THE DIALOGUE PRINCIPLE o MONOLOGUE: a communication process lacking in interactivity, during which one person  speaks while another listens o DIALOGUE: an interactive process involving speaking and listening  Effective communication CULTURAL DIFFERENCES AND CONVERSATION o Cultural differences affect how we have a conversation:  Our reasons for having a conversation  Word choices  Length  Value of conversation  Feelings about turn­taking  o To the extent to which we understand differences, we increase our changes of facilitating  e
More Less

Related notes for COMM 1040

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit