Study Guides (248,402)
United States (123,377)
Boston College (3,492)
Economics (366)
ECON 1131 (105)
All (56)

Complete Principles of Economics I/Microeconomics Notes Part 10 - Got 93% in the course!

6 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 1131
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Microeconomics Notes: Chapter 11 Keely Henesey Monopolistic Competition: −  Monopolistic Competition :  o  Relatively Large Number of Sellers Results In :  Small Market Shares (limited control over market price)  No Collusion (unlikely due to large numbers)  Independent Action (each firm can make decision without consideration of  rival­firm reactions) o  Differentiated Products :   Physical/Qualitative Differences  Service/Conditions Surrounding Sale of Product (helpfulness of clerks, reputation for  servicing or exchanging, prestige, etc.)  Location/Accessibility of Stores Selling Product (convenience)  Brand Names/Packaging (trademarks, celebrity connection)  Some Price Control (within limits, buyers will pay more for preferences) o  Relatively Easy Entry/Exit :  Only Potential Barrier  ▯financial due to need to develop/ advertise  differentiated product o  Advertising :  Expense/effort of differentiation is wasted if consumers aren’t aware   Goal of Nonprice Competition  (differentiation/advertising)  ▯make price less  of/differences more of a factor in consumer purchases • If Successful  ▯demand increases/becomes more elastic − Measuring Degree of Industry Competition: o  Four­Firm Concentration Ratio : percentage; pure competition is low, pure monopoly  is high; MonopolisticCompetition<40 ≤Oligopolies Output of Four Largest Firms Four FirmConcentrationRatio= TotalOutput∈Industry o  Herfindahl Index : sum of squared percentage market shares in all firms in industry  ▯ intentionally gives greater weight to more powerful firms; pure competition approaches  zero, pure monopoly is at its maximum of 10,000 2 2 2 2 H erfindahlIndex=( S )1+( S )2+( S )3+…+( S ) n o  Four­Firm Concentration Ratio’s Shortcomings in Identifying Oligopolies :  Localized Markets: applied to nation as a whole but markets for some products  are highly localized  ▯local oligopolies can exist even though national  concentration ratios are low   Interindustry Competition : competition between two products associated with  different industries (ratios are based on somewhat arbitrary industry definitions ▯   aluminum/ copper industries are often in competition)  Import Competition: ratio may overstate concentration by not including foreign  suppliers  Level of Dominance of Firms: doesn’t reveal the extent to which one or two  firms dominate an industry Microeconomics Notes: Chapter 1 • Industry X is pure monopoly and Industry Y has four firms each with  25% of market  ▯4­Firm Ratio shows identical 100% concentration  ratios for each • Herfindahl Index Addresses Problem  ▯Industry X would be at the  10,000 maximum, Industry Y would be 2500 Price & Output in Monopolistic Competition: −  Assumption   ▯each firm is producing a specific differentiated product and engaging in a certain  amount of advertising  −  Demand Curve : highly, but not perfectly elastic (elasticity depends on number of rivals and  degree of differentiation) − Produce Where… output is where  [MR=MC] ; price is demand curve at that output − Short Run  ▯profit or loss which (s  C )(Q) MIN − Long Run  ▯Normal Profit (if profits, firms enter; if losses, firms exit) o Complications: not always the case; exceptions…  If firms achieve sufficient differentiation, they gain sufficient monopoly power  to realize modest economic profits even in LR  Product differentiation increases financial barriers to entry, suggesting some  monopoly power with small economic profits continuing in LR Monopolistic Competition & Efficiency: − Neither Productive (P=ATC MIN ) Nor Allocative (=MC ) Efficiency: o Productive  ▯[P>ATC MIN] ; ATC min  slightly higher than optimal for society o Allocative  ▯[P>MC] ; optimal output is where demand curve intersects MC  Underallocation creates efficiency loss (deadweight loss) −  Excess Capacity : plant/equipment are underused because firms are producing less than the  ATC mintput o  Graphically : gap between min  output and profit­maximizing output o If Monopolistic Competitors Could Profitably Produce Where ATC & MC Curves  Crossed… (1) ATC minuld enable lower price, & (2) fewer firms would be needed to  produce industry output  By not producing at ATCminmonopolistically competitive industries are  overpopulated with firms operating below optimal capacity Product Variety: − Firm attempts to protect economic profit in LR through differentiation/advertising o Although they add to costs, they can also increase demand (also, price­cutting has little  to chance of increasing profit) − Societal Benefits of Product Variety & Improvement  ▯more choices/better quality o Consumer Choice & Productive Efficiency Trade­Off: the greater the excess­capacity  problem, the wider the range of consumer choice − Monopolistically competitive firm juggles three factors (price/product/ advertising) in seeking  maximum profit  ▯Each possible combination poses a different demand/cost situation and  only  one combination yields maximum profit o Optimal combination can’t be readily forecasted  ▯ trial­and­error Microeconomics Notes: Chapter 1 Oligopoly: −  Oligopoly :  o  A Few Large Producers : vague; could be three huge firms dominating entire national  market or five much smaller stores in a medium­sized towns market o  Homogeneous/Differentiated Product : industrial goods (homogenous); consumer goods  (differentiated  ▯considerable nonprice competition through heavy advertising) o  Control Over Price BUT Mutual Interdependence : firms are “price makers” but must  consider how rivals will react to changes  Strategic Behavior: self­interested behavior (seeking to expand profits/ “grow  business”) that considers others’ reactions  Mutual Interdependence: each firm’s profit depends not only on its own price  and sales strategies but also on those of other firms o  Entry Barriers : economies of scale (closely related: large capital expenditure);  ownership/control of raw materials; patents; moreover, oligopolists can prevent entry  through preemptive/retaliatory pricing and advertising o  Mergers:  oligopolies emerge through growth of dominant firms and mergers  Underlying Motive to Merge  ▯desire for monopoly power ( greater control over  market supply and thus price; ALSO as a larger buyer of inputs, may be able to  demand and obtain lower prices for them) Oligopoly Behavior: Game­Theory Overview −  Game­Theory : study of how people behave in strategic situations (oligopolists pattern their  actions according to rivals’ actions/expected reactions; mutual interdependence) −  Collusion : cooperation with rivals; in oligopolies, independent action can lead to lower  prices/profits  ▯oligopolists benefit from collusion o Incentive to Cheat  ▯cheating is lucrative to cheater/very costly to the cheated  [TYPICAL RESULT: both firms cheat and settle back to low­price strategy] Three Oligopoly Models:
More Less

Related notes for ECON 1131

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit