Study Guides (248,151)
United States (123,290)
Boston College (3,492)
Philosophy (239)
PHIL 1070 (72)
Final

FINAL PAPER PHILOSOPHY.docx

9 Pages
125 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1070
Professor
Mavis Fenn
Semester
Fall

Description
1 Delgado Chantz Delgado Philosophy of the Person I December 11 , 2013 Aristotle and Aquinas In Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and St. Thomas Aquinas’ Politics and Ethics,  both philosophers demonstrate similarities and differences. Aristotle’s ethics are based on  the fundamental questions of life such as “who am I” and “what am I supposed to do with  my life?” Aristotle claims that people are social beings and they should live a virtuous  life in accordance with reason. The end goal is happiness. Aquinas believes that there are  levels of happiness and the last level of happiness obtained through God, is true  happiness. Aristotle has an interesting piece on law that is somewhat similar to the sub­ categories Aquinas’ uses to express his ideas on law. Lastly, both philosophers offer their  viewpoints on virtue. Aristotle believes that “every art and every inquiry, and similarly, every action  and every intention is thought to aim at some good; hence men have expressed  themselves well in declaring the good to be that at which all things aim.”  Essentially,  Aristotle supposes that people naturally mean well in their actions. The end good is  happiness. “Most people are almost agreed to its name; for both ordinary and cultivated  people call it ‘happiness,’ and both regard living well an acting well as being the same as  being happy. But there is disagreement as to what happiness is, and the account of it  given by ordinary people is not similar to that given by the wise.”  In other words, people  view happiness differently. Sensual pleasure, intelligence, and virtue are all examples of  things that contribute to goodness or the feeling of goodness, but neither is considered  2 happiness. Aristotle states, “for just as in a flute­player or a statue­maker or any artist or,  in general, in anyone who has a function or an action to perform the goodness or  excellence lies in that function so it would seem to be the case in a man, if indeed he has  3 a function.”  Talent and skill does not lead one to happiness because any person can learn  a skill. Aristotle thinks that the supreme good is related to one’s rationale and soul. The  rational part of one’s soul controls their actions. Therefore, one must live a virtuous and  contemplative life in order to achieve happiness, and it is possible to do that while living.  Aquinas agrees with Aristotle in that happiness cannot be obtained through bodily  pleasures, but inputs that is cannot be obtained unless it is through God. “Not is clear that  the functions that are followed by the (bodily) pleasures mentioned above are not man’s  4 ultimate end but are directed at certain specific ends.”  Additionally, Aquinas states that  happiness depends on living with a virtuous disposition. He also asserts that man’s  ultimate happiness is not in this life. “The more someone knows the more his desire for  knowledge increases. And this occurs by nature.”  Aquinas trusts that the end good is  through God and in order to achieve happiness, one must contemplate and gain  knowledge his whole life, and since there is nothing more perfect and all knowing than  God, one will reach perfection when one meets God. This is only done through death, and  thus, true happiness cannot be achieved during one’s lifetime. “The perfect happiness of  man consists in a knowledge of God that exceeds the possibilities of any created intellect  it was necessary that man should receive a certain foretaste of this kind of knowledge, so  as to direct himself towards the fullness of the blessed knowledge that takes place  6 through faith. ”  Through faith, one can live a happy life but it is not complete happiness.  Once one reaches God, they achieve complete bliss. 3 Delgado Aristotle argues his point on law. Aristotle states that the highest form of  happiness is contemplation and this is reached by rationalizing. Aristotle trusts that in  order for one to live a virtuous life and to properly stay on track to reach happiness, one  must obey the law. “But it is difficult for one to be guided rightly towards virtue form an  early age unless he is brought up under such right laws; for a life of temperance and  7 endurance is not pleasant to most people, especially to the young.”  Fundamentally, laws  are strict guidelines that lead the abiding citizen to a virtuous life. Coupled with  contemplation, laws will provide a person with complete happiness. Laws are needed for  a man’s entire life because it forces a man to stay within the boundaries of what society  deems as good. Aristotle claims that pursuing virtue should be a law as well. However, it  is hard to prove one’s mental contemplation of virtue. Aristotle makes a good point  stating this because the average man obeys laws just because of the common notion that  laws make people good. Nonetheless, if the law reads that people should pursue virtue,  people will naturally pursue virtue resulting in more people obtaining complete  happiness.  Aquinas believes that natural law is innate and necessary. Law is directed toward  the common good. “Every part is ordered to the whole as the imperfect is to the perfect.  The individual is part of a perfect whole that is the community. Therefore law must  concern itself in particular with the happiness of the community.”  Aquinas says that  anyone can make a law for himself or herself and that the sole intention of a law is to  “lead men to virtue.”  Aquinas argues over four types of laws: eternal law, natural law,  human law, and divine law. “We have stated that law is nothing else than a certain dictate  of practical reason by a ruler who governs some perfect community.”  Since God  4 governs the world and God is eternal, then this type of law is considered eternal law since  it is not subject to time. Natural law is law that includes those that participate in  rationalizing. Those that understand that rationalizing coincides with eternal reasoning  fall under this type of law. Human law is not innate in people but it is acquired by the  effort of reason. “In the same way human reason must proceed from the precepts of the  natural law as from certain common and indemonstrable principles to other more  particular dispositions.”  These dispositions arrived by reasoning are examples of human  laws. Lastly, divine law directs human life. Law directs man to actions that are  appropriately ordered to hi
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 1070

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit