Study Guides (248,145)
United States (123,289)
Boston College (3,492)
Philosophy (239)
PHIL 1071 (25)
svetelj (1)
Midterm

Midterm Study.docx

4 Pages
58 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1071
Professor
svetelj
Semester
Spring

Description
Why does Aquinas write the Summa Theologica? Aquinas wrote Summa Theologica to  find a connection between   theology and philosophy   by organizing and  combining popular ideas of reason with faith represented in the Bible. He attempted to answer three questions:  what can we know about God, what can we know about humans/creations, and how can we return to God. Why do we need, besides philosophy, another ‘science’ about God? Humans require “divine revelation,” which is a message from God that teaches us how to get back to Him.  However, philosophy does not provide divine revelation by itself. First of all, both philosophy and theology lead  towards the same answers about God, so both are necessary even though they are “different” sciences. ( A  physicist and an astronomer both proves the Earth is round, but the physicist uses mathematics while the astronomer uses the object  itsel)Also, philosophy is only studied by a few people and it takes a long time to reach divine conclusions,  which are still prone to errors. So, in order to reach true divine revelation, one must study philosophy AND  theology—also known as sacred doctrine—because God gives it to everyone. Is the sacred doctrine a science? There are two types of principles of science: principles of self­evidence and principles of higher science.  Principles of self­evidence are known to us and are understandable by the human mind, whereas principles of  higher science are given to us by a higher force (like God, etc.) because it is not self­evident to us . For example,  principles of higher science are self­evident to people in heaven, but not to us, so we have to accept th. Sacred h faith doctrine IS a science because it falls under the category of principles of higher science, which is equal to  principles of self­evidence. Also, people claim that science DOES NOT deal with individual facts while sacred  doctrine does. However, these “individual facts” are more of moral examples. Why is sacred doctrine nobler than other sciences? Sacred doctrine is nobler than other sciences because it is theoretical, whereas other sciences are practical.  Theoretical sciences have certitude because they are based on the divine, and they are based on God, who is the  highest power and knowledge. It also teaches us how to get to the end goal. Practical sciences are susceptible to  human errors because it is NOT based on God. It also teaches us simpler, less important things, and NOT an end  goal, like getting back to God. Is the existence of God self­evident? There are two types of self­evidences: things that are self­evident in itself AND to us (like the fact that a whole  pizza is bigger than a slice of pizza) versus things that are self­evident in itself but NOT to us (like an engine,  which is self­evident in itself, but we don’t understand it and its workings). The phrase “God exists” is self­ evident alone in itself, but we don’t understand the essence of God, so it is not self­evident to us. Nevertheless,  it—or God—exists. What does Aquinas mean when he claims that a word in Holy Scripture may have several  meanings/senses? Aquinas believes that we shouldn’t take the Bible word by word because it wouldn’t make sense. Rather, we  can interpret it in several different ways, which would give each word a new meaning and message. • Literal o  Historical  = things represent historical events • Spiritual o  Allegorical   = things represent bigger, more complex ideas and concepts (ex. the cave) o  Moral   = how we should live out lives (ex. 10 Commandments) o  Anagogical   = helps us understand the present in order to have the best future (ex. Book of Job) o  Analogical   = comparison between two things o  Parabolic   = stories that represent a higher meaning o  Etiological  = helps us understand the reasons behind the stories (ex. Moses’ divorce) Can it be demonstrated that God exists? There are two types of demonstrations: “a priori” (cause) and “a posteriori” (effect). Through “a priori” we try  to predict effects from a cause, whereas through “a posteriori” we try to understand a cause from the effects. We  can only demonstrate that God exists through “a posteriori” because we have no information about the cause,  and we only have evidence of the effects. We can’t demonstrate the existence of God through “a priori” because  we don’t know the essence of God, thus we cannot know the cause. How does Aquinas prove the existence of God (five ways)? 1. Motion: A  ▯B  ▯C  ▯D a. Each object in motion was set in motion from a starting point/object, which is God. We can work  backwards from moving things around us in order to find the starting point, which is God. 2. Efficient Cause a. An effect MUST stem from a cause, which is God. If the cause didn’t exist, then none of the  effects will exists because they are dependent upon the existence of the cause. Therefore, God  must exist if he is the cause of everything. 3. Possibility and Necessity a. Everything is contingent—it either CAN be or it CANNOT be. If something “CANNOT be,”  then it is nothing and it does not exist. If this is true, then its roots would be non­existent as well  because nothing can come out of nothing. So at some point, something HAD to exist. This  “something” was necessary, NOT contingent, and it will always exist. This is God. 4. Gradation a. There are different levels of everything, some are better and some are worse. Everything that  exists, however, is somewhat good, because God is good. Therefore, God is the cause of all  things. For example, fire is a representation of maximum heat, so it created all things that are hot. 5. Intelligence a. Every working being in the universe has an end goal or a plan, but WHO designs the plan?  Aquinas argues that “The Planner” must be God because our lives and our plans must be  controlled by a higher intelligence. Why does Descartes write ‘Meditation of first Philosophy’? Explain the main issues of the book. What  kinds of questions is Descartes trying to answer in his book? What does Descartes think his book will  offer the reader? Descartes wrote his Meditations in response to the uncertainty in Europe during the Renaissance of his time.  Both the scientific revolution (ex. heliocentric model of the universe) and the discovery of America sent Europe  into chaos and confusion. Descartes wanted to find the truth, and then base all knowledge off of that. He tries to  answer questions about existence: how do we know life isn’t a dream, what is the basis behind our existence,  how do we know things exist outside ourselves, does God exist, and why do we make mistakes? He thinks his  b
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 1071

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit