Study Guides (248,518)
United States (123,397)
Boston College (3,492)
Philosophy (239)
PHIL 1071 (25)
Midterm

midterm study guide.docx

12 Pages
85 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1071
Professor
Colin Connors
Semester
Spring

Description
Philosophy of the Person II Midterm Study Guide Mathematics Principles of Natural Philosophy (Newton) What is science? Its method? Science: ­Observation ­Reason/theory ­which comes first? Which is more important? ­Coepernicus­geocentricity (sun vs. earth) ­Mathematics as method of proof Objectivity­just looking at object’s qualities Subjectivity­understanding object from persipient point of view Skepticism­suspension of judgment, indifference, neutral, neither believe nor disbelieve Key form of skepticism (Immanuel Kant): when acknowledge explicitly the limits of  your knowledge and can prove and disprove  ­more active Ex: Existence of God Result of scientific revolution: limit on capacity of human knowledge ▯ value of  philosophy  ­not as many questions philosophy can answer Rationalism vs. Empiricism Empirical­measurable, quantifiable, observable Empiricism­all knowledge is from observations Ex: David Hume (extreme), John Locke ­thesis­proposed idea Rationalism­belief that there are inate ideas ­logic Ex: Renee Descartes­idea of self is inate, God ­antithesis­denial of the thesis ­Dispute: whether or not some ideas are inate­ not experience ­Critical philosophy­synthesis of rationalism and empiricism (not one exclusively) ­main proponent: Immanuel Kant (began as a rationalist) ­because of some ways the mind works, reality is actually put together and  altered from external to obtain knowledge of it ­different from Theory of Abstraction because sensation is not direct and the  space (where Aristotle would say you see) is something in the mind *object in front of you is not self­evident Two Kinds of Properties (Galileo) ­why skepticism became such a big deal ­Mind’s Eye Model of Perception­what you know is the idea in your mind ­arose because of distinction between primary and secondary properties ­do not perceive chalkboard—just your idea Can you prove existence of something beyond your mind? *TV screen in a dark room ­dark room= mind Text: Motion is the cause of heat ­sensation of heat does not exist in the object that “is hot”, but in the body  receiving the sensation ▯ secondary properties Primary Property—necessary for material objects, quantifiable *objective *Ex: size, shape, motion/rest, amount ­in some ways conceived by mind as well Secondary Property­pertaining to object *subjective *Ex: taste, smell ­Galileo: secondary properties don’t belong to object, they are sensations/idea vs. ­Locke: acknowledges sensation and links powers of primary properties secondary properties is in us locke has a “third” sensation which is a power in the object that we react to ­Medieval philosophy: science = Aristotilian physics­ things act for an end (theology)— not quantifiable ­Plato proposed a science based on mathematics but it was rejected (even though he was  Aristotle’s mentor) ­scientific revolution is more an affirmation of it and rejection of Artistotilian ­no way to prove perceptions aren’t just in you mind Inquiry Concerning Principles of Morals (David Hume, moral philosophy) ­Support position  ▯emotional involvement can blind you Vs. Devil’s advocate ­Problem: if you are too emotionally involved, you will not listen to anything else  ▯need  to figure it out for yourself ­Morals—awareness of right vs. wrong, nature vs. nurture PO: morals vs. social acceptability Why is murder considered wrong? “Don’t do unto others…” PO: last semester’s adultery example  PO: Easier to punish than to reward well ­nature of consequences *Conscience tells you what not to do *Do morals come from reason (mind) or sentiment (heart)? Massochist example—screwed up sentiment PO: depends on cost of action—may be against reason but if consequence is not that bad,  may go with sentiment anyway  (utilitarianism) ­Reason: to settle disputes ­Sentiment: actions that reason cannot pertain to—at least not without sentiment Ex: love, hate *Key social virtue: benevolence­ removes envy of people who have earned their high  success (by those not as successful) *implicit: notion that what pleases people is utility(usefulness) ­Humes is not a utilitarian though ­utility typically from recipient’s side but also would want people to  be benevolent back to you too ­helping others ­societal contribution *in best interest of the successful people and those not as successful ­Law would be trivial if only based on sentiment ­Can’t reason all the time *Reason alone  ▯no moral content ­need sense of emotion (ex: pain) ­deals with utility ▯ asseses actions ­solution of disputes ­Sentiment provides the force necessary to choose a decision and accomplish the ends  provided by reason ­willing ­motivation ­Humans are ruled by sentiment *Reason is passive, an observer, has no force (like Mind’s Eye model) *Sentiment (subjective) drives reason but can oppose each other Ex: theft and hunger ▯ theft = bad but hunger is overruling sentiment Child­purely sentiment Varying levels of reason  ▯different outcomes Reason deals with two kinds of perceptions: 1)  Matters of fac ­way of describing something that is true or false  ▯existence can be   denied ­object, activity, habit—noun  ­Sky (noun) is blue (blueness= noun) ­Is/Ought fallacy—cannot conclude what should be from what is 2)  Relations of ideas ­truths that are necessary by implication, ideas that come from  one idea ­triangle  ▯Pythagorean theorem ­familial relations: father  ▯son *But if you agree with Mind’s Eye Model (locked into content of your mind) and these  two perceptions ▯ morality is  not reason alone *All Humes inquiries are based on his empiricism that all ideas are traceable to some  sensation or impression  ▯need to find source to prove validity ­Evil is based on contrariety (relation to good): if other person turns cheek (good will),  whole relation isn’t evil  ▯*can’t conclude any morality questions ­can’t perceive sense of evil or goodness in matter of fact by reason ­Mind/reason is inherently passive: receives information but cannot structure and  conclude (that is sentiment) *Reason reacts to that content: slave to sentiments of approval and disapproval Public and Private Interest ­Humes argues for compatibility of both ­public interest forms foundation of private interest ­very interwoven but public has slightly more priority  ▯but if public interest somehow  conflicts in the moment, this is not saying what you should/shouldn’t do  ▯*more like  analysis of how most people conceptualize How can we have public interest with divergent goals and moralities?  ▯3 arguments: 1) Public interest is not indifferent to private interest ­improves it actually ­when they concur  ▯greater sense of moral sentiment  ▯approval of action 2) Part­whole: what benefits society, benefits individual ­usually concide, rarely contradict ­members of same society 3)*Man is not a solitary creature­ if private interest contradicts public▯ onstantly  unhappy ­humans are social ­naturally seek out others ▯ engage their interest too ­doesn’t mean neglecting your own because seeking others for social  experience makes you happy PO: neglecting your own happiness seems going against human nature  anyway which you were doing in the first place by seeking others Appendix II: Of Self Love Two contrasting theories of self­love: 1) Benevolence= Hypocrisy ­“mask” to live in society ­really just private interest, no public interest ­seek only our own gratification 2) No passion is disinterested—need self interest ­public interest is a mesh of modified private interest ▯ makes private possible ­opinion of Thomas Hobbes: Leviathan ­disagrees except that public interest considered in both—private  makes public possible ­Humes is more optimist about humanity than Hobbes ­Live in state of war ­human beings are like atoms in motion (chaotic) ­conflicting interest like conflicting motions  ­confliction ▯ war ­sake of preservation: humans surrender private interest to   authority to preserve/protect each member of society (ex:  security) ­Humes is more like 2­acknowledges public interest ­response: private interest increases  ▯public interest increases (second  argument for public vs. private interest) ­private interest can only be fulfilled if there is a public interest ­would respond to first by saying that even if it helps you, it is still in light of  that inner­sentiment of seeking out others and will ultimately benefit others ­impossible to be indifferent to human cruelty ­human sympathy implies public interest or that sentiment  would be blocked off completely *If this deceit is a part of benevolence  ▯would be able to see deceit in every benevolent  act Illusions and lies for Humes?—problem for him PO relation of ideas Two Treatises of Government (John Locke) Treatise I: objection to specific type of government: absolute monarchy­not  constitutional, Divine Right of Kings­takes rule from God, father­son succession,  originated with Adam ­line of descent based on first born ­should only be one king for the world  ▯one world government ­no elections Robert Filmer­proponent of absolute monarchy ­need paternal authority ­women excluded *human beings are not born free—inherently need authorative figure ­need reason to be free ▯ what about ruler? Also irrational?  ▯No, gets reason from God ­PO: Rational animals ▯ so what defines a human? How does Filmer know what he’s talking about if he’s not a monarch and independent  thought is an illusion to him?  ▯just assessing and relaying what monarch thinks Identifying who he’s talking to  ▯we view ourselves as rationalizing and free ­brute fact in our constant stream of perceptions  or ­have to deny your perceptions ­then where does our knowledge ocome fro
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 1071

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit