Study Guides (248,018)
United States (123,271)
Boston College (3,492)
Philosophy (239)
PHIL 1090 (34)
Midterm

Perspectives Midterm.docx

5 Pages
47 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1090
Professor
Andrea S Staiti
Semester
Fall

Description
Perspectives Midterm:  Plato Big Themes: • Justice • False Appearances • All the forms of government­tyranny, democracy, etc.  • Education • Role of the Guardians • Development of the Perfect State • Theory of the Soul • The Principle of Specialization­goes against people being well­rounded,  contradicts the fundamental principles behind Jesuit education  • The Cave Allegory • Why it Pays to Be Just The Republic Book I: • What is justice?  • Cephalus (old, wealthy man) states justice is speaking the truth and living  up to your legal obligations (such as returning what is lent to you) • Socrates argues that you wouldn’t give back a weapon to a mad man even  if it was legally his, and you wouldn’t tell the truth to a mad man • Polemarchus states justice means you should seek to benefit your friends  and harm your enemies • Socrates argues that people make mistakes in distinguishing between who  is a friend and who is an enemy, thus we might end up harming someone  good and helping someone bad • Thrasymachus (sophist) states that justice is nothing other than the  advantage of the stronger. It does not pay to be just. Justice is merely a  social convention we are taught to adhere to but it is not beneficial to us.  We should focus on our own personal gain and not abide by justice. • New Challenge: Is justice worthwhile? • Socrates advances the idea that justice is a virtue. Justice is a virtue of the  soul, therefore it is desirable because it means health of the soul • Justice is not what you do, rather justice is what kind of person you are  and the knowledge necessary to live a good life.  Book II: • Glaucon’s kinds of good: 1. Things we desire only for their  consequences (physical training/medical treatment) 2. Things we  desire for their own sake (joy) 3. Highest class: things we desire  for their own sake and its consequences (knowledge and health) • Most people place justice as something practiced for only its  consequences • People aren’t willingly just, rather they are compelled to be by  order of social contract • Invisible ring example: when people can do an injustice without  penalty, they do it • Ademiantus adds to the argument by stating that justice itself is not  praised, justice is only practiced due to its high reputation in life  and the afterlife • Socrates creates a theoretical city • People must perform a specialized role in society by natural  inclination • Education of the guardians is the most important aspect of the city • The origin of the community is neediness Book III: • Socrates states that poets are unfit to be educators because  they portray unjust people as happy and portray injustice as  profitable if it goes unpunished • Places an emphasis on how stories should be told in the  city. Story telling through imitation should not be allowed.  The guardians must be focused on protecting the city • City must achieve a balance between physical training and  music and poetry • The good of the state as a whole overrides personal  freedom, strict social classes in place • “Myth of metals”­states that all citizens were born out of  the earth to instill pride and patriotism in the citizens,  government propaganda so there is no confusion about who  should rule, some are born metal, gold, silver, etc. not  everyone is equal • Do whatever is necessary to preserve the natural order Book IV:  • The aim of the city isn’t to make any group extremely  happy, but rather to make the city happy as a whole • Statue metaphor: you wouldn’t just make the eyes of a  statue the most beautiful, you would deal with all parts of  the statue equally to make it beautiful as a whole • Guardians (philosopher­kings) serves a governing bod
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 1090

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit