Study Guides (248,410)
United States (123,379)
CAS AR 100 (71)
All (48)
Final

COMPLETE Great Discoveries in Archaeology Notes: Part 3 - 4.0ed the final exam!

12 Pages
43 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Archaeology
Course
CAS AR 100
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Human Origins I 01/30/2014 The Superfamily Hominoidea Members of this superfamily Distinctive molar cusp pattern Enlarged brains No tail Anatomical specialization in the shoulders and arms allow them to hang suspended below branches Chimps and gorillas are mainly terrestrial (knuckle walking) Our closest ancestor 99% genetically identical to humans around 50 genes separate humans and chimps DNA shows and evolutionary divergence between 6­8 MYA African origin The Chimpanzee Bipedal 40% of the time But limb proportions, knee and pelvis morphology make bipedality inefficient Bipedality first appears at least by 6 MYA in our ancestors Height (sexual dimorphism) Males 4 feet Females 3 feet Chimp Washoe was the first to learn to communicate using American Sign Language Hominids vs. Hominoids Traditionally anthropologists used tool use to define humanness We need more criterion for distinguishing these two in the fossil record The Family Hominidae Consists of two genera: Genus Australopithecus (5­1.5) Genus Homo The Data The study of out hominid ancestors is limited in time to the Miocene, Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene  epochs Eurasian, African geologic events are key research topics since the major phases of human evolution  occurred in the Old World, and the earliest are confined to Africa The Miocene (25­5.5 MYA) Large interchanges of animals ensue Formation of the Mediterranean Sea. Before this there was an open waterway called the Tethys Sea The formation of the closed Mediterranean caused climatic changes Forests of East Africa give way to a more open country environment (mosaic environment)­ this is likely a  key factor behind the appearance of the family Hominidae The tectonic collision of the African and Eurasian plates also caused geologic instabilities resulting in the  formation of the Great Rift Valley in the Middle East and Africa Some time after the beginning fo the Miocene there is a series of speciation in an ancestral hominoid  population, eventually leading to independent lines of the African and Asian pongids (chimp, gorilla and  orangutan) and hominids. When did the hominid line split off from hominoids? 5­7 mya according to biochemical data 10+ mya based in fossil data The Fossil Evidence 5T01/30/2014 The Fossil Evidence 5T01/30/2014 “millennium Ancestor” hominoid discovered in 2000 in Kenya 13 fossils looks bipedal teeth very human dated 6 mya the shape of the femur is controversial The Pliocene Grasslands spread Development of mosaic habitats of grassland, bush and small stands of forests Australopithecus­ A.ramidus Ethiopia 50 individuals now known  probably bipedal smallest teeth of any Australopithecus forest dweller some recognize A.ramids as the first hominid Australopithecus­ anamensis The Fossil Evidence 5T01/30/2014 Kenya 4.2­3.9 mya teeth like later Australopithecus bipedal arms more modern skull fairly primitive 3.9 mya evolves into A. afarensis Australopithecus­ afarensis Lucy­ 62lbs 100% bipedal retained curved fingers and toes chimp­sized brain How do we know that they walked upright? 6 mya femur traits in A. anamensis tibia and The Laetoli Footprints Australopithecus  afarensis Discovered in 1976 in Laetoli, Tanzania The footprints are in volcanic ash Summary: Chimps and humans diverged at least 6 mya in Africa Anatomical changes in locomotion (bipedalism) precede other changes  Changes in dentition ensue 01/30/2014 01/30/2014 A Split in the Hominid Line A. afarensis evolves into two separate lines The gracile and robust australopithecines Between 3­2.5 mya The Graciles A. Africanus (Taung) Idendtical to A.afarensis in body and brain size Marked sexual dimorphism as well Teeth and jaws larger than modern, but more like human than ape
More Less

Related notes for CAS AR 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit