COMPLETE General Psychology Lecture Notes [Part 13] - 93% on final

5 Pages
81 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychological & Brain Sciences
Course
CAS PS 101
Professor
Maya Rosen
Semester
Fall

Description
Discussion Notes 7 10/28/2010 Attachment An emotional bound between babies and their caregiver that is important for the baby’s survival Are babies attached to their mother simply because mothers provide food? Contact Comfort: The innate pleasure derived from close physical contact, the basis of the infant’s first  attachment Attachment begins with touching and cuddling between infants and parents Even adult humans need touching and cuddling, it is an innate need How important is contact comfort when raising a child? Can we see this behavior in other primates? Margaret and Harry Harlow (1960s) raised rhesus monkeys with two kinds of artificial mothers: Wire Mother: A forbidding construction of wires and warming lights, with a milk bottle connected to it This mother provided food but not comfort Cloth Mother: Constructed of wires but covered in foam rubber and cuddly terry cloth, no milk bottle  connected Provided comfort but not food Mary Ainsworth: Strong attachment to the primary caregiver becomes visible at 6 months of age, lasts until  about age 3.5 years “The Strange Situation” Mother returns: “the reunion” What is observed?  Four aspects: The amount of exploration (e.g. playing with new toys) the child engages in throughout The child’s reactions to the departure of its caregiver The stranger anxiety (when the baby is alone with the stranger) The child’s reunion behavior with its caregiver Noticed three types of attachment: Secure attachment Will explore freely while the mother is present, will engage with strangers, will be visibly upset when the  mother departs and happy to see the mother return Easily soothed by the mother when she returns Will not engage with a stranger if their mother is not in the room Insecure Anxious­Ambivalent Attachment A child with an anxious­ambivalent attachment style is anxious of exploration and of strangers, even when  the mother is present.  When the mother departs, the child is extremely distressed The child will be ambivalent when she returns – seeking to remain close to the mother but resentful, and  also resistant when the mother initiates attention.  When reunited with the mother, the baby may also hit or  push their mother when she approaches (Mothers are often deeply depressed, addicted to drugs, inconsistent in affection, highly abusive, etc.) Insecure Avoidant Attachment A child with an anxious­avoidant attachment style will avoid or ignore the caregiver – showing little emotion  when the caregiver departs or returns The child may run away from his caregiver when they approach and fail to cling to them when they pick him  up.  The child will not explore very much regardless of who is there.  Strangers will not be treated much  differently from the caregiver. Does not take into account cultural differences Discussion Notes 8 10/28/2010 Stress and Emotion Hostility and your Health One aspect of the Type A personality has been linked with heart disease Hostility (people who are mistrustful of others and are always ready to provoke argument) Benefits of Positive Emotions Study of the autobiographies of 22 year­old nuns The nuns whose stories contained the most words describing positive emotions live 9 years longer on  average than nuns who described the fewest positive emotions Can also counteract the physiological arousal caused by negative emotions and chronic stress People who express positive emotions are also more likely to attract friends and supporters Emotional Inhibition What happens when you try to suppress thoughts or emotions? Increased level of bad (stress) hormones e.g. cortisol Higher blood pressure Increased heart rate Symptoms of hostility/type A personality Trying to suppress a thought or emotion increases its frequency Continued inhibition of thoughts and emotions is stressful on the body Expression of emotions to others 
More Less

Related notes for CAS PS 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit