Ch2-Theories of Crime

9 Pages
95 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 253
Professor
Brandt
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter 2 Theories of Crime 03/02/2014 Theories of Crime We attempt to define factors that can explain why people break laws, become victims, or whether they can  be rehabilitated.  Social class, poverty, the way you grow up. Early theories of crime: We attributed a lot of criminal activity to the devil, religious beliefs. Classical Criminology Theory Theorists moved beyond superstition and mystery Deviance or Crime? Deviance­Behavior that departs from the social norm but is not necessarily criminal.  Cross Dressing­deviant but not illegal. Theories of Crime Causation Examine the forces producing criminal behavior and develop theories as to crime as a function of  personality development or cognition. Others investigate how biological factors correlate.  Criminologists Criminal Stats Victimology Classical School Theory The school of thought that individuals have free will to choose whether or not to commit crimes and that  criminals should have rights in the criminal justice system.  Classical Criminology People have the free will to choose criminal or conventional behavior People choose to commit crime for reasons of greed or personal need Crime can be controlled only by fear. Cesare Beccaria Italian Scholar Beccaria’s theorem Law should be clear Law should be rational Torture is wrong People are innocent until proven guilty Swift­Immediate punishment Certain­ Punishment is more effective then the threat of punishment Proportionate to the crime­don’t over punish Neoclassical Theory A school of thought that is similar to classical school theories except for the beliefs that there are mitigating  circumstances for criminal acts such as the age or mental capacity of the offender and the punishment  should fit. Felicitic Calculus Concept developed by Jeremy Bentham Hedonistic­ People seek pleasure while trying to avoid pain  People make free will decisions to commit crime by weighing the disadvantages vs. disadvantages of  action.  Choice Theory People commit deviant acts because they want to.  Concepts of rational choice theories Careful thought and planning: serial killers Personal needs and situational factors  Utilitarianism A rational system of jurisprudence provides for the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people The Positive School Modern theories of crime primarily based on sociology and psychology that people commit crimes because  of uncontrollable internal or external factors which can be observed or measured.  Elements of Positivism  Human behavior: external forces beyond individual control. Brain structure and bio makeup are influences.  Biological Determinism Cesare Lombroso Physical Characteristics. Criminals have overhanging brows, big noses, big hands, etc.  Biological Theories Human behaviors is constitutionally or genetically determined. Basic determinants of human behavior may be passed from generation to generation. Some behavior is the result of propensities inherited from more primitive developmental stages in the  evolutionary process.  Twin Studies: born biologically criminal.  Psychological Explanations ­ Freud Behavior is not a matter of free will but is controlled by subconscious desires which includes the idea that  criminal behavior is a result of unresolved internal conflict and guilt.  Social Determinism The idea that social forces and social groups are the cause of criminal behavior Sociological Theories: The idea that social forces and social groups are the cause of criminal behavior.  Social Disorganization Theory When you combine the socioeconomic, the groups they hang with, not much of a positive outlook leads to  deviant behavior Socialization Views Conflict in home Inadequate schools Deviant peers Inadequate self­image The Chicago School Shaw and McKay The closer you get to the industrial of the city the more crime you’l
More Less

Related notes for SOC 253

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit