Ch10.docx

7 Pages
101 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 253
Professor
Brandt
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter 10 Probation and Parole Parole: early release of prisoners.  States Turn to Diversion, Probation, and Parole  Prisons are expensive. Many states are finding that the costs to run prisons is competing with other  budgetary needs such as roads, education and infrastructure. With an increase in state prison population of  500 percent since the 1970’s, most state budgets can’t keep up with the ever increasing costs. Many states  are looking for ways to reduce spending in the prison system. Since about half of all convicted offenders are  non­violent, non­sexual offenders, many states are turning to probation and parole as alternatives to  incarceration. Diversion and Probation  Diversion ­ A defendant is offered an alternative to criminal trial and a prison sentence, such as drug courts,  boot camps, and treatment programs. Probation – the conditional release of a convicted offender prior to his or her serving any prison time. Also  called a suspended sentence. Probation – a convicted offender must serve their full sentence if they violate terms of their release. Mandatory Release and Good Time Release Mandatory Release – the release of prisoners required by law after they have served the entire length of  their maximum sentence Good­Time Credit – a strategy of crediting inmates with extra days served toward early release in an effort  to encourage them to obey rules and participate in prison programs Pardon and Commutation of Sentence  Executive Pardon – an act by a governor or the president that forgives a prisoner and rescinds his or her  sentence Commutation of Sentence – a reduction in the severity or length of an inmate’s sentence issued by a state  governor or the president of the United States. There are no limitations on the number of pardons that a governor may grant. Probation 1841 – John Augustus 1878 – Massachusetts passed the first probation statute 1900 – Four states had similar statutes 1920 – Every state permitted juvenile probation and 33 had adult system. Augustus was a wealthy Boston shoe maker who devoted himself to bringing reform to the criminal justice  th system of the 18  century. He was critical of the conditions of the jails and was concerned that for many  offenders, being sentenced to jail would cause more harm that good. In 1841 he developed what is known  today as probation. He was in court when a defendant was convicted of being a common drunk. Augustus  asked the judge to release the man to him rather than sentence him to jail. Augustus assumed  responsibility for the mans behavior and provided for his rehabilitation. After 3 weeks he brought the man  back to court for evaluation. The judge liked what he saw in the outcome of the experiment. After that,  Augustus  monitored trials and had more than 2,000 defendants assigned to him. By 1878 Massachusetts  passed the first probation statute in the country. By 1900, four other states passed similar legislation. By  1920, every state permitted juvenile probation and 33 had adopted a system of adult probation. Today, more  people are on probation and parole than are sentenced to prison.  Conditions of Probation (did not spend any time in jail) Tend to be fixed by state statute, while special conditions are mandated by the sentencing authority and  take into consideration the background of the offender and the circumstances surrounding the offense. Alice Meyer was convicted of her second DUI.  The judge sentenced her to probation.  She had to abide by  the general conditions of probation in that jurisdiction, including meeting with her probation officers once a  month, obeying all laws and maintaining employment.  The judge added to specific conditions.  First, she  was required to attend Alcoholic Anonymous meetings once per week.  Second, she had to attend a victim­ impact panel.  At these panels offenders listen to survivors of drunk driving accidents and talk about the  harm caused my the crime.  Conditions Standard Obey all laws Possess no firearms Maintain employment Specific Depends AA meetings Victim impact panels Decisions to Grant Probation When sentencing offenders to probation or suspended sentences judges assume  –Prison is inappropriate –The public is not in serious risk –The offender would not benefit from prison –The offender would be self­supporting –The offender is not mentally ill –The offender will not commit other crimes Probation is a sentencing option of judges. The judge relies on the extent of the presentence investigation  report to make a judgment about the appropriateness of probation. The Office of Probation and Pretrial Services provides federal judges with presentence reports. Presentence Investigation Report A narrative of the circumstances of the offense. The defendant’s criminal history A description of the defendant’s lifestyle including Employment Financial condition Family to support Community contribution Advantages of Probation Costs $1000 a year  General conditions of pr
More Less

Related notes for SOC 253

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit