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DNCE 1017 Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Scopitone, Cultural Capital, Soundies


Department
Dance
Course Code
DNCE 1017
Professor
Bonnie Cox
Study Guide
Midterm

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Exam 2 Review Notes 9
Music Videos
Music videos as advertisements
o Impact of live performance on the small screen
o Promotional tool that falls into ad arena
o Impact used to create identity that brands artists, can be used for ads
Music videos history
o Dance musicals 1930s
Busby Berkeley: visual experience over physical expression of a lot of
people
Fred Astaire: prioritized dancing, insisted on full-body shots
o Fantasia (Disney): 1940s
first unintentional long-form music video
o Soundies: 1940-1946
3 minute musical films featuring dance
o Scopitone: 1958-1960s
Juke box with dance videos on them
o 1970 slump in music recording industry
o new pop 1980s
blurring boundary between human and tech enhanced performance
needed new medium to promote and perform music
o premiere of MTV: 1981
inspired by stars of early musicals
Madonna and music video
o Changing images as cultural capital
o Experimentation, change and production of individual identity
o Positions herself as innovator close to underground cultures
o Offers possibility of a new commodity of self that can be consumed
Beyoncé and music video
o Coutdow
o Appropriated Ae Teresa de Keersaeker’s choreography fro Rosas Dast
Rosas
Current music videos
o Viewership: can be examined from many angles of representation
Takeaways
o Music videos are a form of advertising the image of the artist as well as ideas and
commodities. Artists are often used as memes to sell products in commercials
o Busby Berkley and Fred Astaire made dance integral to film in different but
important ways. Busby Berkley focused on kaleidoscopic big picture effects with
bodies while Fred Astaire focused on solo dancing and detailed movements in
the body. Music video innovators drew on their techniques in the 1980s and
continue to do so today.
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