Study Guides (248,000)
United States (123,267)
Psychology (300)
PSB 2000 (145)
Midterm

Exam 4 Study Questions & Answers

3 Pages
107 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSB 2000
Professor
Orenda Johnson
Semester
Fall

Description
Study Questions: Learning and Memory 1. What is an engram, and what were Lashley’s critical mistakes in looking for the  engram? An engram is a physical representation of memory. Lashley trained rats then cut  or leaisoned certain areas of the cortex, where the tissue was removed had no  effect on performance, but the amount of tissue removed did. Lashley’s false  assumptions were that memory is in discreet regions of the cortex and that all  memories are physiologically the same.  There are different types of memories and different brain areas important for  these.  2. What are implicit memory and explicit memory? What brain regions are  important for each? Implicit Memory: A type of memory in which previous experiences aid in the  performance of a task without conscious awareness of these previous experiences.  You don’t necessarily realize you’re using memory. Skills and habits, emotional  assosiations and conditioned reflexes. The striatum, motor areas of cortex,  cerebellum and amygdala are important.  Explicit Memory: Deliberate recall of information that one remembers as a  memory. Remembering events (episodic memory), and knowing facts (semantic  memory). The hippocampus is important as well as nearby cortical areas and the  medial diencephalon.  3. What are some differences b/t short­term memory (working memory) and long­ term memory?  What brain region is important for working memory? Short Term Memory: Small capacity, fades quickly unless rehearsed, once  forgotten it is gone, working memory is an alternate way of thinking of STM.  Lasts hours to days without rehearsal, where car is parked, when/where lunch date  is. The time needed for consolidation verie, especially depending on familiarity of  topic and emotional content. The prefrontal cortex is important for working  memory.  Long Term Memory: Infinite capacity, lasts indefinitely.  Could be forgotten then  later remembered with appropriate cues. Phone numbers, name of grade school  teachers. Condolidated memories can be reconsolidated.  Hebb made the disdinction: No one mechanism could account for all types of  learning, we form memories almost instantaneously (too fast for any chemical  process, especially if it was then stable enough to retain that memory forver) and  some last a lifetime.  4. What were some of HM’s impairments; what could he still do? They removed much of the temporal lobe including the hippocampus which led to  Anterograde amnesia. He lost declarative (explicit) memory and spatial memory.  His procedural memory (type of implicit) and working memory were intact.  5. With regard to memory, what are some functions of the hippocampus? In adolescents, a smaller size is correlated with better memory performance, in  older people more memory impairment in those whose hippo shrank faster. A  smaller volume is seen in epilepsy and other psychological disorders. The  hippocampus is active during formation of memories and during recall, also with  consolidation of declarative/explicit memory. There is increased activity in the  hippocampus while doing a special task, damage leads to impairment of spatial  tasks. In London taxi drivers there is a larger posterior hippo and positive  correlation to time being a taxi driver.  6. What other brain regions are important in learning and memory, and what type of  learning do they subserve? Cerebellum: Important for learning a conditioned response and aslo for motor  learning (skills) and cognitive stuff Parietal Lobe: If this is damaged, don’t spontaneously elaborate on memories Temporal Lobe: Damage causes semantic dementia. SD: loss of factual  knowledge. This is most likely because it is a hub for retrieving knowledge not  the location of storage. Prefrontal Cortex: Learning reward and punishment. Also working memory.  7. What is a Hebbian synapse? This is a synapse that increases effectiveness because of a simultaneous activity in  pre and postsynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. “Cells that fire 
More Less

Related notes for PSB 2000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit