Study Guides (247,988)
United States (123,266)
Psychology (300)
PSB 2000 (145)
All (109)

Introduction to Brain and Behavior [NOTES] Part 1 -- I got a 92% in the course

5 Pages
82 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSB 2000
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Genetics  What can genes influence?  Every aspect of physiology  Facial expressions, intelligence, sexual orientation, alcoholism, psychological  disorders, metabolism, aggressive behavior, etc  The basics  Genes (like chromosomes) come in pairs  Chromosomes contain DNA, sequence of DNA = gene • Sometimes genes overlap on a stretch of chromosome  ♦ This can determine your susceptibility to certain diseases  ♦ Although multiple genes contribute to each of these phenotypes  46 chromosomes • 22 pairs (autosomal) chromosomes; plus 2 (XX = female, XY = male)  DNA is transcribed into RNA, RNA is translated into protein  You have 2 copies of each chromosome; homozygous = same; heterozygous = different;  dominant traits (such as tongue rolling and Huntington’s disease) are genes that show  strong effects whether it’s a homo­ or heterozygous condition; recessive genes (such as  attached earlobes) are genes that only show strong effects in a homozygous condition   PTC (phenylthiocarbamide) and Taste  A gene for a bitter receptor • Homozygous recessive (tt): can’t taste PTC • Heterozygous (Tt): it tastes somewhat unpleasant • Homozygous dominant (TT): it tastes HORRIBLE • Lots of behavioral implications including taste in foods, likelihood to smoke,  drink, etc.  Sex­linked genes  The genes on the sex chromosomes (usually X because it has a lot more genes than  the Y) • Consider a gene on the X chromosome ♦ If a male gets this gene, he will display the trait ♦ A female must get it on both of her X chromosomes to display the trait ♦ If a female has it on 1 X and not the other, she is a carrier • Usually have a family history…otherwise due to a spontaneous mutation   Fragile X syndrome, Red­green color blindness, Duchenne muscular dystrophy,  hemophilia  Sex­limited genes  Present in both sexes but has an effect only (mostly) in one sex  Genes for chest hair (men), breast size (women)  Genes are “turned on” under influence of sex hormones   Heritability  Estimate of how much of the variance in a characteristic/population is due to  differences in heredity (genes) • Is a difference between you and me due more to differences in our genetics or to  differences in our past/present environment? • Estimates of heritability apply to a certain population at a certain time; they are  not absolute  How do we know about heritability of behaviors? •  Biochemical methods  ♦ Identification of certain genes linked to behaviors or disorders   Ex­ certain genes more common among people with depression ♦ This begs more questions:  How much is the genes associated with the condition?  Twin studies on heritability • Monozygotic: identical • Dizygotic: fraternal • Resemblance: MZ>DZ  ▯high heritability ♦ The more DNA 2 individuals
More Less

Related notes for PSB 2000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit