Study Guides (248,216)
United States (123,294)
Psychology (300)
SOP 3004 (46)
All (23)

Social Psychology COMPLETE NOTES [Part 11] -- got 92% in the course

6 Pages
51 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
SOP 3004
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Persuasion   Persuasion • Process by which a message induces a change in beliefs, attitudes, or behaviors • End goal = attitude change.  Real life examples of persuasion •  Getting into a good situation, like dating   2 routes to persuasion •  elaboration likelihood model → central route to persuasion – when interested people focus on the arguments and respond  with favorable thoughts (deep processing) ⇒ Audience is analytical and motivated ⇒ Processing is high, elaborate and includes agreement or counter arguing ⇒ Convincing arguments evoke enduring agreement → peripheral route to persuasion – when people are influenced by incidental cues (shallow  processing) ⇒ Audience is not analytical or involved ⇒ Processing with low effort using peripheral cues and heuristics ⇒ Cues trigger liking and acceptance, but often only temporary.  Attitude change •  Central route  → When an issue is relevant → High motivation and ability → People are able to pay close attention to the arguments → Long­term attitude change • Peripheral route  → When an issue isn’t relevant → Low motivation or ability → People are unable to pay close attention to the arguments ⇒ Use heuristics ⇒ Short­term attitude change  Credibility •  Expertise­ → Knowledgeable ⇒ We find people to be more knowledgeable when they are confident and talk fast  • Trustworthiness­ → Look in the eye and argue against self­interest   Attractiveness and liking • Physical attractiveness • Similarity → More persuasive → Subjective preference – similar better → Objective fact – expert better  The message • Reason vs. Emotion → Reason more persuasive for intellectuals → Good mood – more responsive to persuasive messages → Humor = good mood → Moderate fear appeals – most persuasive  The channel: how the message is delivered  • Mere repetition: just repeating it; does it work? It’s generally good but it can also be super  annoying (especially if it’s annoying to begin with) → Best way: repetition with variety (ex.­ Geico “15 minutes can save you 15% or more”:  gecko, little pig, cavemen, two guys playing guitar) • Personal experience > media: but not everyone can have personal experience → 2 step flow: media reaches out to opinion leaders (people with a lot of followers or  influence) and then they do the face to face work  ⇒ Video­ most effective with easy messages because it’s more lifelike; written is most  effective with difficult messages because you can take it at your own pace  The audience • Age: young people are easier to persuade  ▯more na ïve, don’t have prior opinions or  experience • Forewarned is forearmed: if you know someone is going to try to change your opinion,  they’re less likely to be able to • Need for cognition: want them to use central route; persuade based on argument quality;  these people like challenging their brain • Stimulating thinking makes strong messages more persuasive and weak messages less  persuasive   Persuasive techniques • Maintaining consistency → Foot­in­the­door: you get someone to agree to a small request and then to a larger request ⇒ Sign in window “drive safely” (small); then a larger, ugly sign in their yard; 80% of  people who previously agreed, agreed whereas only 20% said yes with only the larger  request ⇒ Gain compliance with a small request, make a related, larger request → Lowball technique: start with low­cost request and later reveal the hidden cost ⇒ Ex.: shipping/handling costs, car dealership  ⇒ Get them to agree to something and then change the terms of the agreement → Bait and switch: draw people in with an attractive offer that isn’t really available and  switch to a less attractive, more costly offer; once you get them in the mindset that  they’re going to buy something, they’re going to buy something → Labeling theory: assign a label to someone, making a request consistent to that label ⇒ “You seem like a generous person… would you care to donate t
More Less

Related notes for SOP 3004

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit