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Study Guide

COM 110 Study Guide - Comprehensive Final Exam Guide - The Walt Disney Company, Thesis Statement, Short Time


Department
Communication
Course Code
COM 110
Professor
Lindsey Kraus
Study Guide
Final

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COM 110

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PREPARING TO PARTICIPATE
Chapter 1: Introduction to Communication
1.1
Knowledge
List and describe the three benefits of studying communication.
The three benefits of studying communication are:
1. Personal Benefits:
By improving your communication skills, you are able to become more confident
in what you say to people and develop better listening skills. For example, improving
these skills can help you to maintain meaningful relationships by expressing your
points of view and any ideas you may have. It can also allow you to identify and talk
about any problems you may have with whomever it may be.
2. Professional Benefits:
While you improve your communication skills, it can better prepare you for your
upcoming professional life. Communication is key during job interviews and
presentations, whether it’s for school or a job. These skills can also help you with
understanding different ways to talk to an audience face-to-face or with e-mail. This
course is going to help me build and support my arguments and organize my own
ideas.
3. Social Benefits:
Social Benefits are also results to studying communication. These skills can help
you persuade people in thinking about your point of view on a certain subject.
These also allow you to make decisions for you and your community. For
example, voting. The skills that communication gives us empowers us to have
conversations about politics, and the power to communicate with them, your point
of view on the subject matter. It can also help you make your decision in the
voting booth.
1.2
Knowledge
List and define the six elements of the communication process.
The six elements of the communication process are:
1. People:
“Communication involves interacts with people” (pg. 7 in EBook). These
conversations usually include the communicator and the listener. In each conversation
anything can be discussed including, experiences, values, goals, etc. different people
have different experiences and references so being specific in conversations can clear
up points made easier.
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2. Messages:
Communication can be verbal or nonverbal messages. The messages are what we
say in conversation. We need to make our messages understandable by using clear,
powerful and accurate words so the person listening doesn’t have any confusion and
can correctly include their own message back. Nonverbal messages can rage
anywhere from symbolic gestures, facial expressions or tone of voice. These
messages can help you emphasize your feelings throughout the conversations.
3. Channel:
This process includes to which way we choose to speak to someone (Face-to-face,
e-mail, calling, texting, snapcahtting, etc.). We have to know which channel to use
during the appropriate time. For example, if you’re going to be late for work calling is
probably the most appropriate way to let them know. A text or e-mail probably won’t
go over so well because they might not see it in time.
4. Interference:
Interference is anything that can get in the way of information being shared
between the communicator and the listener. External interference ca be any type of
distracting noise, like loud music, or other people talking, that can interrupt the
speaker and the listener’s conversation. Internal interference can affect a person’s
concentration or can include personal concerns or physical ailments which could be
more important than the conversation at hand. Other internal interferences can include
shaking or stuttering during presentations because you’re so nervous or stressed out.
5. Feedback:
This is a very important element in the communication process. Both the speaker
and the listener are involved at the same time. While the speaker is sending the
message the listener is able to understand and send a messages back out their
concerns or other inputs they may have upon the conversations. Feedback is really
helpful during personal situations. For example, person A is failing math and tells
person B that they are going to drop out of college. Person B can then take in the
message she just received and give their input on the situation (Obviously in this
situation person B would tell person A not to drop out and that they can get help
during tutoring or from their professor).
6. Context:
This element of the communication process helps us picture in greater detail what
is going on during the conversation. Including the time of day, location, or what
event was going on can eliminate any concerns your audience may have of the
situation. We use different types of conversations in different contexts. For
example, you wouldn’t tell your professor where or when you went to a party and
got very intoxicated. That would be a better conversation for your friends in your
dorms.
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