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Study Guide

ANTH 1003- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 25 pages long!)


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTH 1003
Professor
K.Chance
Study Guide
Final

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LSU
ANTH 1003
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Ferdinand de Saussure
Langue- the systematic aspect of language
Parole- individual speaking acts
Signifier- the sign (e.g. the word pipe)
Signified- its meaning (e.g. the concept, or the thing indicated by the signifier, e.g. the pipe)
3 Kinds of Sign
1. Icon: The icon is a pattern that physically resembles what it stands for
a. A crown, or a picture of your face is an icon of you
2. Index: Defined by some sensory feature, A (directly visible, audible, etc.) that correlates
ith ad thus iplies o poits to B)
a. Smoke indicates fire
3. Symbol: primarily a mental association, and secondarily an association from
environmental patterns
a. Words are symbols
Geertz
Belieig… that a is a aial suspeded i es of sigifiae he hiself has spu, I take
culture to be those es…
Culture: is a public symbolic action
Wink/Blink example: Misrecognition happens with a lack of familiarity with the imaginative
universe within which acts are signs
Thik ethogaphi desiptio: is the task of the ethogaphe, it is iterpretive, specifically of
soial disouse, it edeaos to take the aties poit of ie, ad it is oeed ith
locality (microscopic- not microcosmic)
Limits to Ethnography (ethnographic writing)
Sensory experiences, intersectional identities, etc.
Characteristics of Post-modern anthropology:
Writing about subjectivity
Emphasis on emic accounts
Skepticism toward claims of producing objective and universally valid knowledge
Rejection of grand, universal narratives or theories to explain other cultural contexts
(e.g. particularly of Enlightenment rationality)
A critique than an anthropologist can write/speak for a cultural other
Cultural Relativism o Patiulais: a idiiduals eliefs ad atiities should e udestood
by others in terms of that idiiduals o ultue
Universalism: a idiiduals eliefs ad atiities should e udestood  i tes of a set of
universal rules
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Positionality: the sujets positio ithi a field of soial elatios e.g. race, class gender,
sexuality, etc.). The ethnographer is a positioned subject, instead of an objective, neutral, or
impartial observer
Reflexivity: Making the research process itself a focus of inquiry, laying open pre-conceptions
and becoming aware of situational dynamics (e.g. of power) in which the interview and
respondent are jointly involved in knowledge production
Anthropology of emotion: an examination of emotion across cultural contexts
Rosaldo- reflexivity in article; experiences emotion of rage when brother dies and then fully
when his wife dies having fall of a cliff while studying
Ritual- Rosaldo:
‘itual as ioos s. as a us itesetio
As ioos
o Typically defined by its formality and routine, a fixed program
o Is assumed to store encapsulated wisdom of a culture
As us itesetio
o Takes place in formal and informal settings of everyday life
o A place where a number of distinct social processes intersect
o Is a vehicle for processes that occur both before and after the period of its
performance
o Is an incomplete, open-ended process
Fil: Caial Tous “epik ‘ie
1. Ipeialist ostalgia- guy went to the stone and had a big German interest
2. post-modern elements
3. positionality in ethnography
s postodeis aoued the death of gad aaties of Weste odeit
BUT
The pole is athopologists ae ol iteogatig these gad aaties ithi
anthropology, which has been long producig koledge aout the “aage “lot
The diffeees etee the West ad the o-West ae luier than ever before
The o-West has ee deostutig Weste etaaaties fo etuies
The o-West has ee teated as a old ithout history, while a profound a-historicism
has characterized the treatment of Western modernity
The “aage “lot:
M. Touillot agues that The “aage “lot has ee eieted for the contemporary
oet, fo istae, as the teoist, efugee, feedo fighte, opiu o oa
goe, o paasite pg 
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