RNR 1001 Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Cryosphere, The Dust Bowl (Film), Sulfur Dioxide

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Published on 2 Jul 2014
School
LSU
Department
Renewable Natural Resources
Course
RNR 1001
Professor
Lecture Study Guide - focus not only on knowing the terms and concepts, but examples of each one.
Make sure you know the concept if you see a definition, and the definition if you see the concept.
However, examples will likely be the basis of many test questions, not specific definitions.
Introduction
Non-renewable and renewable natural resources
Conservation
Sustainability
Sustainable resources includes the genetic composition of living resources
Sustainability of production versus sustainability of function
The Industrial Age; think of consequences for natural resources
Henry David Thoreau - what is he known for?
George Perkins Marsh - what is he known for?
John Muir - what is he known for?
Gifford Pinchot - what is he known for?
Theodore Roosevelt - what is he known for?
Franklin D. Roosevelt - what is he known for?
Aldo Leopold and the Land Ethic - what is he known for? Three stages of ethical development
Frontier ethics
Important events in North American frontier colonization; gold rush, transcontinental railroad, Desert Land
Act
Doctrine of Prior Appropriation for water in the west, date or appropriation, beneficial use, diversion
important
Colorado River problems
Organic and inorganic fertilizers; disadvantages of the latter
Tall- and short-grass prairies
The Dust Bowl - why did it happen?
Rachel Carson - what is she known for?
- bioaccumulation
- persistence
Hazards of pesticide use – pesticide resistance
Paul Ehrlich - what is he known for?
Barry Commoner - what is he known for?
Stewardship and conservation ethics
Ethical views on natural resources, e.g., pollution, hunting, whaling, ethics can be situation-dependent
Surveys for public opinion
- design
- distribution
- random versus stratified random
- purpose of surveys
Anthropocentric (instrumental, human centered) values of natural resources versus biocentric or
ecocentric (nature, biodiversity, and ecosystem function) values
Natural Resource Ecology
Ecology and applied ecology
Environment
- biotic and abiotic factors
Objectives for science - quantifiable
Biosphere
Photosynthesis by photoautotrophic organisms - inorganic molecules to organic molecules and oxygen
Biosphere includes the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and cryosphere
Terrestrial photosynthesis – influenced by rainfall, temperature, and nutrient availability/soil type (sols)
Aquatic photosynthesis - affected by turbidity
- abiogenic turbidity - sediment pollution
- biogenic turbidity - algae bloom (becomes self-limiting, negative feedback loop)
Species – can interbreed and produce viable offspring, hybrids typically exhibit reduced fitness
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Document Summary

Lecture study guide - focus not only on knowing the terms and concepts, but examples of each one. Make sure you know the concept if you see a definition, and the definition if you see the concept. However, examples will likely be the basis of many test questions, not specific definitions. Sustainable resources includes the genetic composition of living resources. The industrial age; think of consequences for natural resources. Important events in north american frontier colonization; gold rush, transcontinental railroad, desert land. Doctrine of prior appropriation for water in the west, date or appropriation, beneficial use, diversion. Organic and inorganic fertilizers; disadvantages of the latter. Ethical views on natural resources, e. g. , pollution, hunting, whaling, ethics can be situation-dependent. Anthropocentric (instrumental, human centered) values of natural resources versus biocentric or ecocentric (nature, biodiversity, and ecosystem function) values. Photosynthesis by photoautotrophic organisms - inorganic molecules to organic molecules and oxygen. Biosphere includes the atmosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and cryosphere.