RNR 1001 Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Silviculture, Revegetation, Shelterwood Cutting

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Published on 2 Jul 2014
School
LSU
Department
Renewable Natural Resources
Course
RNR 1001
Professor
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of 2
Lecture Study Guide for Exam 4
Forests
Forest controversies and issues in the news
Forest values
Coniferous and deciduous forests
Primary and secondary ecological succession
Secondary and old growth forests
Factors influencing forest development - how (why?) are they important:
Temperature, rainfall, aspect, elevation, salinity
Shade tolerance
Seeding and germination habits - co-evolution with pollinators and seed dispersers
Pattern and rate of growth
Age at maturity
Soil characteristics
Fire - surface and crown, fire climax communities, prescribed burning
Diseases and parasites
Insects
Pollution
Forest conservation and forest management (silviculture and other considerations)
Sustainable forestry – rotation length for different objectives
Sustainable forestry objectives
Forest management cycle
Even-aged management, shelterwood, seed-tree, and clearcutting
Uneven-aged management, selective cutting, highgrading and genetic selection; high-retention
harvesting now preferred by conservationists
Harvest - incorporation of BMPs, such as the SMZ, stream crossings, re-vegetation, etc.
Regeneration - site preparation, genetic improvement, inter-harvest management - thinning,
herbicides and pesticides
World fuelwood demand; charcoal is substituted in urban area
- Less wood demand with movement up the “energy ladder”
- Silvoarable and silvopastoral agroforestry
- advantages of planting trees
- leadtree example, advantages and disadvantage
Tropical forest loss
- Reasons for loss, why we care; ethics and stewardship; role of multinational companies
Loss of industrial forestlands
- REITs and TIMOs; forest conversion? Conversion to plantations or suburban development
- conservation easments and biomass and ecosystem service evaluation likely solutions?
Paper demand; advantages of recycling
Wildlife
Wildlife conservation and management activities
Game and non-game management
Management consists of manipulating organisms, habitats, and human user groups
Niche characteristics - why would they be important to a manager, and what would we do about
them?
- Food quantity and quality
- Cover requirements
- Reproductive habitat requirements
- Population dynamics (life history strategy)
- natality, inversity
Age at first reproduction
Average maximum age
Parental care and growth
Mortality sources and rates
Wildlife responses to stress
Management objectives; both game and non-game
Management alternatives depend on objectives
Management plan based on succession, niche, population dynamics, human impacts, …
Historical management based on large, upland, and waterfowl game species
Managing succession for different species groups
Climax community species
Mid-successional species
Early-successional species
Edge, inherent and induced, why is it good, and why is it bad?
Habitat management practices for various species, bald eagle, Kirtland’s warbler, …
Artificial nesting habitat
Hunting - compensatory and additive mortality
Control of population sizes and sex ratios
Funding for wildlife management - Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act (Pittman-Robertson)
How can hunting affect the genetic composition of a population?
Threatened and Endangered Species
Endangered Species Act of 1973
Taking, critical habitat, review committee in 1978, habitat conservation plans in 1982
Imperiled species management activities:
Refuges, preserves
Refuge design - fragmentation, territory, home range considerations
Biosphere reserves
Gene banks and botanical gardens
Captive breeding
Egg pulling
The California condor - a species destined for extinction, but maybe not…
Genetic concerns
Effective population size
Genetic diversity and genetic drift

Document Summary

Factors influencing forest development - how (why?) are they important: Seeding and germination habits - co-evolution with pollinators and seed dispersers. Fire - surface and crown, fire climax communities, prescribed burning. Forest conservation and forest management (silviculture and other considerations) Sustainable forestry rotation length for different objectives. Uneven-aged management, selective cutting, highgrading and genetic selection; high-retention harvesting now preferred by conservationists. Harvest - incorporation of bmps, such as the smz, stream crossings, re-vegetation, etc. Regeneration - site preparation, genetic improvement, inter-harvest management - thinning, herbicides and pesticides. World fuelwood demand; charcoal is substituted in urban area. Less wood demand with movement up the energy ladder . Reasons for loss, why we care; ethics and stewardship; role of multinational companies. Management consists of manipulating organisms, habitats, and human user groups. Management plan based on succession, niche, population dynamics, human impacts, . Historical management based on large, upland, and waterfowl game species.