PS 106 Study Guide - Fall 2018, Comprehensive Midterm Notes - United States Congress, Point Of Sale, Supreme Court Of The United States

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12 Oct 2018
School
Course
PS 106
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
Fall 2018
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Intro to US Politics
Government - a collection of institutions backed by force (so it’s powerful); we are the
government
Institution - system where people get together to provide a service
* Structure shapes policy
- How something is set up, affects what happens in this country
- We in America have a two-tiered government (federal and state)
- In France or England, there’s a one-tiered national government, and there’s only one
source of power
- 89% of the laws that govern us directly are state laws
Questions to keep in mind:
Why do we have government?
Why do we need government?
Jean Jacques Rousseau
- Said good people living peacefully is their natural state (State of Nature)
- When something happens that upsets the people (a natural disaster, a fight among the
people), the State of Nature turns into a State of War
- What we need is a State of Civil Society, where each person gives up some freedoms for
protection by government
- “Men are born free, but everywhere they are in chains.”
John Locke
- People are born with rights and no one can take them away unless they do something
wrong (such as commit a crime)
- ^ this was a very radical notion in the 1800’s, when everyone is a peasant and is ruled by
a king or queen
- Locke said in a government, you need two things: law and legislative
- The government exists to help its people
* The American approach to power is always to split (such as congress: where there is a House
and Senate)
- One branch of government cannot have more power than the other branch
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POS 106 01
Notes 9/7/17
How to read the textbook for this course:
1. Read the introduction and conclusion
2. Read the “core of the analysis” (i.e. the major themes)
3. Read the text
* Politics is a game
- It’s very serious
- Everyone has the ability to understand it
People who vote the most:
- Old people
- Rich people
- Religious people
- ^ these three groups make up 80% of the voters
- The majority of people DON’T vote
A Timeline:
1750’s - the colonies are still under rule of the English king; England started to levy taxes in the
colonies due to the French-Indian War that they were involved in; these taxes were moderate that
did not affect everyone (i.e. tax on stamps, tax on large European imports); nevertheless,
colonists despised it
- There were basically three classes of colonists and I’m going to explain them as “sides”
Side A: merchants, plantation owners, royalists; the wealthy people; aka the 1% of the
1750’s
- Royalists - wealthy people who got big chunks of land appointed to them by the
crown
Side B: middle-class farmers, artisans, lawyers; the middle class
Side C: everybody else, laborers, sailors, women, poor people, slaves
1765 - Stamp Act
1767 - Imported Goods Act
1773 - Tea Act
Boston Tea Party
- 1773
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