Study Guides (247,988)
United States (123,266)
Management (91)
MGT 418 (1)
Midterm

MGT 418 Exam 3.docx

9 Pages
96 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Management
Course
MGT 418
Professor
Paula Wilson
Semester
Spring

Description
MGT 418 Exam 3 Chapter 11 Grievance Administration and Arbitration  Grievance Administration  ­The grievance procedure = due process  ­Goal = achieve remedy at lowest level  Step of the Grievance Procedure  1. Lowest level­ usually oral and might include the steward  2. If not resolved in step 1, employee pursues grievance in writing 3. If not resolved in step 2, matter becomes very serious. Involves top management and  union officers… It is very costly  4. Arbitration… if step 3 fails, the union initiates a legal decision. Decision is final and  binding.  1­ oral.  2­ writing.  3­ at table.  4. Arbitration­ Final and legally binding court judgment.  Step 2 and 3 are like a breakup Step 4 is like a divorce  Going to Arbitration ­How a Union decides to Pursue Arbitration  ­Is it winnable? ­Is it significant? ­Should the issue wait for contract negotiations? ­Does union have a special obligation to the employee?  Why Employees Pursue Grievances ­Management is being fair  ­Disagreement about discipline ­It is a mechanism for dealing with MGT ­It is a way to cover issues not addressed in the contract ­Allows concerns to surface outside of the bargaining process  Grievance Arbitration ­4  step in the grievance process  ­Judgment is final and legally binding  ­Taft­Hartley section 203d ­Steelworkers trilogy ­Scope of court’s reach ­Quid pro quo ­Court focus is on process, not decision  ­Collyer Decision  ­Olin and United Technologies  The Evolution of Arbitration ­Clinical approach in early post war years ­Modern arbitration includes: ­Formal rules of evidence ­Examination and cross examination of witnesses ­Submission of written briefs ­Post hearing briefs ­Written transcripts The Function of the Grievance Procedure ­Provides “industrial/workplace justice” to employees ­Avoids work stoppages for employers ­For both: promotes consistency and handles unanticipated conflicts ­Society desires industrial peace  Arbitration ­Has its own procedure ­Aspects include  ­Pre­hearing briefs ­The hearing ­The arbitrator’s decision ­The arbitrator’s decision is geared towards resolution.. NOT punishment  How an Arbitrator makes a Decision ­Discipline for just cause ­Progressive discipline  ­Past practices… very important  Note: Arbitrators are often LIR professionals or lawyers with vast levels of experience.  Interplay Between Negotiations and Contract Administration ­The relationships during negotiations carry over to contract administration ­Cooperative relationships increase likelihood that grievances will be settled at lowest  level ­Effects of technology can be resolved through arbitration ­Business strategy and arbitration  ­Business strategy and arbitration The Performance of the Grievance System ­It is effective when resolved at lowest level ­Takes a lot of time  ­High costs ­Research suggests that retribution can follow the grievance procedure  The Duty of fair representation  ­Steele v. Louisville & Nashville RR and Vaca v Sipes—good faith  ­Exclusive representation rights; fairly, partially and in good faith ­The employee’s willingness to bring forth claims ­Unions are reluctant to drop grievances ­Has been a rise in court cases dealing with failure to represent  ­3 consequences 1. Court system rides on whether if employee has been treated unfairly 2. Employees are comfortable in taking it to court 3. Unions are afraid to not take grievance all the way to arbitration  Alternatives to the Grievance Procedure in Unionized Settings ­Expedited Arbitration  ­Resolves more grievances ­Lowers cost ­Time limits honored ­Grievance Mediation­ Alternative  rd ­Urds 3  party as mediator and arbitrator  ­3  party makes final judgment  ­Brings cost and time down ­Relations are healed ­Grievance doesn’t work well in Discrimination, or OSHA, or mandatory  subjects.  Conflict Resolution in Non­Union Settings ­Exit the organization ­Develop Speak Up programs ­Ombudsman­ only reports to the leader  ­Issues of union avoidance and employees thoughts  Due Process Mandated by Federal Law? ­Jack Strieber ­Non­unionized employees are going it alone w/o protections ­Should we have a labor law policy, which also provides industrial justice to non­ union workers  Chapter 12 Participatory Processes  1970s­ Quality of Work Life Programs ­As a workplace reform. Had limited success ­Labor & Mgt were not motivated because: ­Initiated by outside agencies ­Viewed as questionable alternatives to collective bargaining  ­Programs viewed as a threat to jobs ­Top Mgt. does not see bottom line relevance  1980s Reengineering of Productivity, Quality & Cost ­Quality Circles ­Weekl top down directed meetings  ­Costs were high ­Most successful approaches blended QWL & QC programs with contract  negotiations ­Open communication  ▯key to success  Team Work Participation and Work Restructuring ­When Teams are used, restructuring must occur because ­Jobs are broader  ­Room needed for worker discretion & judgment  ­Training time is needed ­Time for team management is needed ­Supervisor roles have been redefined  Employee Participation & Bargaining Unit  ­Unions balance worker involvement and union representation via: ­Strong communication with union leaders ­Cooperation ­New union activity ­Development of joint activities for worker benefit  Union Interest is Employment Security  ­Unions participate for security reasons  ­Outsourcing concerns ­90s downsizing sparked union interest in labor management partnerships What do Participation Programs Really Do? ­Some say they are simply stress Mgt. tactics  ­Union avoidance tactic ­Worker involvement reduces costs, increase employment security & motivation ­Heightens union involvement  ­Unions get to promote workers interests early ­Have sparked discussion for NLRA reform   Effects of Participatory Processes ­Some corporation have included union representations of board of directors  ­Employee ownership ­Employee stock ownership plans ­Industry wide labor/ mgt. committees Chapter 13 Public Sector Collective Bargaining  **public employees are not covered by the NLRA  1991 Congress gave post 1978 Two executive orders were brought together Public Sector Collective Bargaining ­Federal Sector­ right­to­strike is prohibited for public sector ­37% of public employees are unionized  ­We must be sensitive to government & public agencies as they provide public services ­Unique characteristics of the public sector shape the employment relationship History of Public Sector Collective Bargaining ­1960s & 70s­ increased budgets ▯ growth in public sector unionism  ­Mid 70s­ revolt against taxation  ▯less clout of public sector unionism ­80s PATCO ­Late 80s – clam period, gain for K­12  ­90s­ downsizing and efficiency  ▯privatization of government services Labor Law for Pu
More Less

Related notes for MGT 418

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit