Chem-Chapter 6.docx

18 Pages
85 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Chemistry
Course
CHEM 1320
Professor
Ganley
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 6: Thermochemistry  9/27 Energy is the capacity to do work. Work: force X distance ­Potential Energy: available by virtue of an object’s position ­Kinetic Energy: energy of motion ­Radiant Energy: in electromagnetic waves, (light) (kinetic) ­Thermal Energy: random motion of atoms and molecules (kinetic) ­Chemical Energy: store within chemical bonds (potential) ­Nuclear Energy: stored with atomic nuclei (potential)  Energy changes in chemical reactions: Heat: transfer of thermal energy between two bodies that are at  different temperatures. Temperature: measure of the thermal energy Temperature IS NOT the same as thermal energy Bathtub=lower temperature, greater thermal energy Coffee=higher temperature, lower thermal energy Thermal energy in an object depends on… ­Temperature ­Mass ­Material Temperature vs. heat Analogy: bank account  ­How much money is in my account? ­How many transfers are in my account? Doesn’t make sense. Consider a solution ­What is the temperature? ­How much heat is in it? Doesn’t make sense ­How much energy? Kinetic energy=temperature  Thermochemistry: study of heat change in chemical reactions System: the part of the universe being studied Exchanged=mass and energy Exothermic process: gives off heat­thermal energy goes from  system to surroundings  2H2 (g) + O2 (g)  ▯ 2H2O (l) + penergy H2O (g)  ▯H2O (l) + energy Endothermic process: heat has to be supplied­thermal energy goes  from surroundings to system energy + 2HgO (s)  ▯ 2Hg (l) + O2 (g) energy + H2O (s)  ▯H2O (l) Exothermic or exothermic? Making ice cubes from water=exo Conversion of frost to water vapor=endo Baking bread=endo Forming a He+ from He (g)=endo Nuclear fission=exo Cl2  ▯ 2Cl=endo 2Na + S  ▯Na2S=exo Units of energy: Joule (J) 1 kg x m^2 x s^­2 ~1 human heartbeat Lift 1 kg by 10 cm calorie (cal) Raise temperature of 1g of H2O by 1°C =4.184 J Calorie=1000 calories = 1 kcal Label on food information 37.2 J to cal 37.2 J    1 cal            x ­­­­­­­­ = 8.81cal               4.184 J 892.1 cal to kJ 892.1 cal     4.184 J       1 kJ                    x ­­­­­­­­­ x ­­­­­­­­­ = 3.732 kJ                        1 cal        1000 J 104.6 kJ to kcal 104.6 kJ     1000J         1 cal          1kcal                  x ­­­­­­­­­­ x ­­­­­­­­­ x ­­­­­­­­­­­­­ = 25.00 kcal                        1kJ          4.184 J     1000 cal 29.4 cal to J 29.4 cal       4.184 J                   x ­­­­­­­­­ =123 J                        1 cal What is energy? The ability to do work or produce heat ­Heat is microscopic ­Work is macroscopic Analogy: coffee in a fridge vs. pushing a desk Heat and work: the only ways to transfer energy Thermodynamics: State functions: properties that are determined by the state of the  system, regardless of how that condition was achieved.  ΔU=U fin­U initial ΔP=P fin­Pinitial ΔV=V fin­V initial ΔT=T fin­T initial 1  law of thermodynamics: ­ energy can’t be created or destroyed  (can change form). ΔU syst+ ΔU surround = 0  or   ΔUsyste= ­ΔU surrounding C3H3 + 5O2  ▯ 3CO2 + 4H2O Exothermic chemical reactions! Chemical energy lost by combustion=energy gained by the  surroundings  9/30 ΔU= q + w ΔU is the change in internal energy of a system q is the heat exchange between the system and surroundings w is the work done (or by) the system w=­PΔV when a gas expands against a constant external pressure *******Table 6.1 Work done by the system: PxV=F x d^3=Fd=w         ­­­­        d^2 w=F x Δd P=F/A F=P x A w= P x A x Δd A x Δd =ΔV w=­PΔV ΔV>0 ­PΔV<0 W sy<0 *Work is not state function ΔW=Wf­Wi Unit canceling w=­PΔV (x)J=L x atm 1000cm^3=1000mL=1L=10^­3m^3 1 atm=101.3x10^3 Pa=101.3x10^3N/m^2 N=kg x M     ­­­­­­­­­­         s^2 x=101.3 101.3J=1L x atm A gas expands from 1.6 L to 5.4 L (constant T). What is the work  (in joules) (a) against a vacuum (b) against a pressure of 3.7 atm? w=­PΔV (a)   ΔV=5.4L­1.6L=3.8L     P=0atm         w=­0atm x 3.8 L = 0Latm=0joules (b) ΔV=5.4L­1.6L=3.8L     P=3.7atm        w=­3.7atm x 3.8 L =­14.1 Latm        w=­14.1Latm x 101.3 J       ­­­­­­­­­­ = ­1430J         Latm 50g of water is cooled from 30°C to 15°C, losing 3140 J of heat.  What is the energy change? ΔU= q + w ΔU= ­3140 J w=­PΔV=0 A balloon is heated by adding 900 J of heat. Expansion does 422 J  of work on the atm. What is the energy change? ΔU= q + w ΔU= 900J – 422J=478J 42.6L of gas expands 48.2L following addition of 1060 J of heat at  1.0 atm. What is the energy change? ΔU= q +w ΔU=1060J w=­PΔV w= ­(1atm)(48.2L­42.6L) w=­(1atm)(5.6L) w=­5.6Latm    101.3 J     x ­­­­­­­­­  = ­570J            Latm ΔU=1060J+(­570J) ΔU=490J 30.2 L of gas expands to 84.2 L following addition of 512 J of heat  at 1.2 atm. What is the energy change? ΔU=q + w ΔU=512J w=­PΔV ΔV=84.2L­30.2L=54.0L w=­(1.2atm)(54.0L) w=­64.8Latm      101.3 J        x ­­­­­­­­­­­ =  6600J  Latm ΔU=512J­6600J=­6100J   or   ­6.1kJ 612 J of heat is removed from 37.2 L of gas at 0.80 atm and the  volume becomes 20.0L. What is the energy change? ΔU=q + w ΔU=­612J w=­PΔV ΔV=20.0L­37.2L=­17.2L w=­(0.80atm)(­17.2L) w=14Latm      101.3 J   x ­­­­­­­­­­­ =  1400J         Latm ΔU=­612J+1400J=800J 10/2 Enthalpy (ΔH) and the first law of thermodynamics At constant pressure: q=ΔH and w= ­PΔV ΔU=ΔH­PΔV or ΔH=ΔU+PΔV Enthalpy (H) Definition: Thermodynamic potential ­Like U ­Measure of a system’s potential energy ­Mathematically: H=U + PV ▯ ΔH=ΔU + PΔV (at constant pressure) ­Units: J or cal ­Recall: ΔU=q + w = q – PΔV ΔH=q­PΔV + PΔV ΔH=q *But only at constant P! Differences between q and ΔH Imagine: P1V1  P2V2        ­­­▯ ­­­­­ T1     T2 Lots of q/w combinations ­Heat and work are NOT state functions ΔH: Same regardless of path ­Enthalpy IS a state function ­Defined in terms of U, P, and V ­ΔH=H f­Hi ­ΔH is intrinsic ­Amount matters Enthalpy and the first law of thermodynamics ΔU= q + w At constant pressure: q=ΔH and w=­PΔV ΔU=ΔH­PΔV ΔH=ΔU+PΔV Constant P: often good enough for chemistry Gas expands, 18 KJ work (done on surroundings) 79 kJ heat released ΔH? = ­79kJ ΔU? = ΔH­PΔV          = ­79kJ­18kJ ΔU   = ­97kJ 418 J heat added P=1.12atm V:5.261L  ▯6.189L ΔH? = 418J ΔU? = ΔH­PΔV          = 418J­(1.12atm)(0.928L)     101.3 J           x ­­­­­­­­­ =  105J     Latm          =418J­105J ΔU   =313J Exothermic: heat given off by the system to the surroundings  ΔH<0 products0 products>reactants 6.01 kJ are absorbed for every 1 mole of ice that melts at 0°C and 1  atm. Endothermic reactions, positive, system absorbs heat. 890.4 kJ are released for every 1 mole of methane that is  combusted at 25°C and 1 atm. Exothermic reaction, negative,  system gives off heat. Thermochemical equations ­Coefficients: always of moles of a substance H2O (s)  ▯H2O (l)   ΔH=6.01kJ ­Reverse the reactions, change the sign of ΔH H2O (l)  ▯H2O (s)     ΔH—6.01kJ ­Multiply both sides of the equation: ΔH changes bi same factor 2H2O (s)  ▯ 2H2O (l)     ΔH=2 x 6.01= 12.0kJ ­Note: change in state  ▯change in enthalpy! Thermochemical equations ­The physical states of all reactants and products must be specified  in the thermochemical equations Heat evolved during combustion of 266 g of P 4? P4 (s) + 5O2 (g)  ▯P4O10 (s)     ΔH=
More Less

Related notes for CHEM 1320

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit