Session 14 Notes.docx

3 Pages
120 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Music
Course
MUSC 1116
Professor
Brian Robison
Semester
Spring

Description
Session 14: Beethoven at the keyboard, again • The characteristics of Beethoven’s “Appassionata” piano sonata • The Archduke Rudolph’s role(s) in Beethoven’s career • Understand Sonata Allegro Form Template and how Beethoven pushed beyond its  conventional boundaries o Lockwood's observation that "The virtuoso keyboard writing and new range  of pianistic colors mark the first movement as a big step beyond any earlier  sonatas" describes piano sonata in C major, op. 53 ("Waldstein") o Lockwood's observation that "This sonata could never have been played by  merely competent amateurs in Beethoven's time. With its arrival the technical  level of the piano sonata was elevated to that of the concerto" refers to sonata  in C major, op. 53 ("Waldstein") • “Appassionata” piano sonata o The title "Appassionata" for the op. 57 piano sonata first appeared  posthumously in 1838, in a four­hand arrangement (i.e., for two pianists  playing at the same keyboard) o The metaphors of 1) "a great journey in which the traveler knows what the  ultimate goal must be but is soon derailed, then recovers and eventually  proceeds to the final destination," 2) "sexual arousal, postponement of  fulfillment, and eventual fulfillment," and 3) "childhood events lost to  memory then later remembered through analysis in adulthood" are all offered  by Lockwood to help explain the emotional trajectory of piano sonata in F  minor, op. 57 o First movement  Dramatic tension   Opens with a quiet theme in octaves (pianissimo, dark, and  atmospheric)  Leaves the dominant harmony hanging and unresolved o Last movement  Tremendous nervous energy that links it directly to the first movement,  but now the perpetual hurtling through minor­mode areas is unrelieved  by any theme as consoling and stabilizing as the second theme of the  first movement  Finale retains its tragic power to the end o One of Beethoven’s most basic formal techniques  1. A firm entry into the musical space, arousing the need for harmonic  resolution 2. The postponement of resolution 3. Then at the end of the movement, emphatic fulfillment of the necessary  resolution by means of decisive
More Less

Related notes for MUSC 1116

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit