Study Guides (234,429)
United States (117,777)
Economics (44)
ECON 3048 (2)
Gene Mumy (2)
Final

3048 Exam One.docx

6 Pages
328 Views
Unlock Document

School
Ohio State University
Department
Economics
Course
ECON 3048
Professor
Gene Mumy
Semester
Spring

Description
Lecture One Scarcity: (Fundamental Premise) Society’s wants exceed the resources available to  satisfy them. This implies choice, both individual and social. The three questions that must be answered in any economy: What how and for whom?  These questions lead to one big one: What is the best way to organize the activities of  individuals? Let people do what they want, plan and regulate, or a mix Concept 1: A choice is a tradeoff, in order to get something we must give up something  else Concept 2: Opportunity cost, the highest valued alternative we give up is the  opportunity cost of the activity chosen Concept 3: The benefit­cost principal, if the benefit of an activity exceeds the  opportunity cost, do it! Otherwise, don’t.  ­We make choices in small steps (at the margin) and those choices are influenced by  incentives.  When marginal benefit equals marginal cost, net benefit it maximized Marginal: One more unit Incentives: Inducements to take particular actions, different incentives change marginal  benefits and costs Incentives and interpersonal behavior need to support cooperation, beneficial exchange,  and general distribution of benefits Lecture Two: Self interest as the basis of economic interaction Ethics: Branch of philosophy dealing with values relating to human conduct, with  respect to the rightness and wrongness of certain actions and to the goodness and badness  of the motives and ends of such actions Selfishness: Denotes an excessive or exclusive concern with oneself; and as such it  exceeds mere self interest or self concern. In that it necessarily connotes a disregard for  others, it is beyond the act of placing one’s own needs or desires above the needs or  desires of others (self interest) Self­Interest: 1. One’s personal profit, benefit, or advantage 2. Regard to one’s own  advantage or welfare especially to the inclusion of others Altruism: Concern for the welfare of others, regard for others as a principle of action;  opposed to egoism or selfishness Two types of Egoism: Psychological and ethical Psychological: Asserts that we do act selfishly. Our motivations are selfish Ethical: Maintains that we should act selfishly  Sophistry: An argument that seems plausible, but is misleading, especially one devised  deliberately to be so; the art of using deceptive speech or writing Sophists­ denoted a class of individuals who taught courses in excellence, these were  often taught for a price. The main idea is that men make their own rules, typically based  on self interest and there are no moral absolutes What would rational beings do? Institute a regime that limits their predations on each  other.  Moral sentiments: However selfish a man may be, there are always some principles in his  nature which interest him in the fortune of others  Complex sequential production processes:  Rivalry: Consumption by one person reduces the amount available to others y by the  amount consumed Excludable: Non­payers can be prevented from consuming the good  Nonrivalry: Consumption by one person does not reduce the amount available to others  (Marginal cost of an additional consumer is zero) Nonexcludable: Impossible to prevent someone from consuming the good The social marginal benefit is the vertical summation of all individual’s MB curves Lecture Three: Public goods and games in economic ethics Two types of goods: Public and private Public features: Nonrivalry and Nonexcludable A free rider is a person who consumes a good without paying for it. Private provision (no  one has the incentive to pay so they let others do it)  Game Theory: A game is a situation of strategic interdependence played according to a  set of rules. In addition to rules games have players, strategies, and payoffs Prisoners Dilemma: Two partners in crime have been caught but the prosecutor only has  enough evidence to convict them for a lesser offense than the one actually committed.  Being kept separate, each player can turn State’s evidence “confess” or “remain silent”  payoffs depend on the combo of strategies chosen Nash Equilibrium: Each player’s strategy is the best against the other player’s strategy Dominant Strategy Equilibrium: For each player there is a single best strategy,  regardless of what the other player does. Not all nash equilibria are dominant strategy Lecture Four: Games and how people act Subgame perfect equilibrium:  For Axelrods tournament: In one shot game there is a dominant strategy­ to defect  Tit for tat: Pay other player back in kind, start with cooperate then do what other player  did in previous round Mutual Reciprocity: Motivated by selfishness but cooperation in one­shot games Lecture Five: Supporting Better Equilibria Normative ethics: Relatively general nature of “what is good” Applied ethics is the  application to narrower domains and practical issues (bus
More Less

Related notes for ECON 3048

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit