Study Guides (248,401)
United States (123,348)
Psychology (242)
PSYCH 2300 (13)
All (9)
Midterm

Comprehensive Notes for Exam 3 (got 95%)

9 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 2300
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Exam 3 ­ Research 11/19/2013 Chapter 9 Covariance: Is the casual variable related to the effect variable? That is, are the levels of the IV  associated with distinct levels of the DV? Temporal precedence: Does the casual variable come before the effect variable in time? Internal validity: Are there alternative explanations for the results? Condition: one of the levels of the IV Typically X­axis=IV and Y­axis=DV Groups Treatment Group: level of an independent variable that is intended to represent some exposure to a  treatment or condition. Control Group: Level of an independent variable that is intended to represent no treatment or a neutral  condition. Placebo: control group that is exposed to an inert treatment Confounds Alternative explanations/ threats to internal validity Unclear what is exactly the change in the DV Design Confounds Confound that varies systematically  along with the IV Usually stemming from a flaw  in the design of the study Systematic Variability Changes in DV that do covary  with changes in the levels of the IV Treatment plus error  Unsystematic Variability Changes in DV that  do not covary  with changes in the levels of the IV Random or Haphazard  Selection Effects  Kinds of participants at one level of the IV are systematically different form the kinds of participants at the  other level of the IV  Need for Random assignment  Controlling for Selection Effects Matched­ Groups Design Participants are measured on a particular variable or trait Participants are then sorted from lowest to highest on this trait They are then assigned at random to experimental groups Experimental Designs We can classify designs into a simple threefold classification by asking some key questions.  First, does the design use random assignment to groups?  We call the design a randomized experiment or true experiment.  Does the design use either multiple groups or multiple waves of measurement?  Yes = quasi­experimental design No = non­experimental design (not great for assessing cause­effect relationships) Independent­Groups Designs (between­subjects designs) Different groups of participants are placed into different levels of the independent variable  Posttest Only Design: participants are randomly assigned to independent variable groups, and are tested  on the DV once Pretest/ Posttest Design: participants are randomly assigned to at least two groups, and are tested on the  key DV twice Within­Groups Designs (within­subjects designs) Only one group of participants, and each participant is present with ALL levels of the independent variable.  Concurrent­Measures Design: Participant are exposed to all the levels of an IV at roughly the same time,  and a single attitudinal or behavioral preference is the DV  Repeated­Measures Design: Participants are measured on a DV more than once; After exposure to each  level of the independent variable  Advantages to Within­Groups Designs Groups are equivalent No need to match on a variable Each person acts as their own control group  Fewer Participants  Power: Ability of a sample to show a statistically significant result when something is truly going on in the  population.  1­Beta (power): The odds of saying that there is a relationship, difference, gain, when in fact there is  one  Disadvantages to Within­Groups Design Order effects  Exposure to one condition changes how people react to the other condition.  Confound  Practice effects, fatigue, boredom, or other contamination that carries over form one condition to the other.  Demand Characteristics: When an experiment contains cues that lead participants to guess its hypotheses  Controlling for Order Effects Counterbalancing: Present the levels of the IV to participants in different orders.  Summary Pre/Post & Within­Groups Chapter 10 Threats to Internal Validity:  The  maturation effect  is any biological or psychological process within an individual that systematically  varies with the passage of time, independent of specific external events.  Examples of the maturation effect include history threat History threat: Events outside of the study/experiment that may affect participants' responses to  experimental procedures; an experimental group changes over time because of an external event that  affects all or most of the people in the group Often, these are large scale events (natural disaster, political change, etc.) that affect participants' attitudes  and behaviors such that it becomes impossible to determine whether any change on the dependent  measures is due to the independent variable, or the historical event.  Regression to the Mean: In statistics, regression toward (or to) the mean is the phenomenon that  if a variable is extreme on its first measurement, it will tend to be closer to the average on its second  measurement; an experimental group whose score is extreme at pretest will get better (or worse) over time,  because the many random events that caused the extreme pretest scores do not recur the same way at  posttest  Attrition: Attrition is when people drop out of the study before it ends. Additionally, who and when they  drop out can have huge implications for your experiment; changes only because that most extreme cases  have systematically dropped out and their scores are not included in the posttest  Testing Threat: Is an order effect which refers to the higher probability of recalling an item resulting from the  act of retrieving the item from memory ( testing ) versus additional study trials of the item. Repeated testing  affects participants.  Placebo: Occurs when people receive a treatment and really improve—but only because they believe they  are receiving a valid treatment....but really not.  Design confound: when a second variable unintentionally varies systematically with the independent  variable Selection effect: in an independent­groups design, when the two independent variables groups have  systematically different kinds of participants in them Order effect: in a within­groups design, when that effect of the independent variable is confounded with  practice, fatigue, boredom, or carryover from one level to the other Maturation: an experimental group improves over time only because of natural development or  spontaneous improvement  Instrumentation: an experimental group changes over time, but only because the pretest and posttest are  not measured equivalently. Repeated measurements have changed the quality of the measurement  instrument. Observer bias: an experimental group’s ratings differ from a comparison group’s but only because the  researcher expects the group’s ratings to differ Demand characteristics: participants guess what the study’s purpose is and change their behavior in the  expected dire
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 2300

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit