Study Guides (248,000)
United States (123,267)
Psychology (242)
All (4)
Midterm

High Level Vision [Notes - EXAM 2] -- I 4.0ed this exam

8 Pages
150 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 5606
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Questions for Exam 2 02/04/2014 1) Describe four different ways that light can interact with surfaces. Matte reflections – light is scattered equally in all directions Specular reflections – light is reflected primarily in one direction Indirect reflections – light reflected from one surface illuminates another Transparency (glass)– light passes through a surface and is refracted Translucency (wax)– light passes through a surface and undergoes subsurface scattering 2) Describe two different types of optical projection. How are they distinguished from one another? Projective geometry investigates the mathematical relationships between objects in the environment and  their optical projections on the retina or on a picture. Perspective Projection: A perspective view is geometrically constructed this way: you have a scene in 3D  and you are an observer placed at a point O. The 2D perspective scene is built by placing a plane, a sheet  of paper where the 2D scene is to be drawn in front of point O, perpendicular to the viewing direction. For  each point P in the 3D scene a PO line is drawn, passing by O and P. The intersection point S between this  PO line and the plane is the perspective projection of that point. By projecting all points P of the scene you  get a perspective view. Orthographic Projection: In an orthographic projection, you have a viewing direction but not a viewing point  O. The line is then drawn through point P so that it is parallel to the viewing direction. The intersection S  between the line and the plane is the orthographic projection of the point P. And by projecting all points P of  the scene you get the orthographic view. The scaling contrast model predicts that the appearance of depth should be eliminated for surfaces viewed  under orthographic projection. 3) How are different object properties categorized by the Klein Erlangen program? Why is this relevant to  human perception? (X, Y)           (X’, Y’)               X’ =  f (X, Y) Y’ =  g (X, Y)               Geometries are defined by the specific properties that are invariant under different types of transformations.  Euclidean: Preserves lengths and angles Similarity: Preserves angles and length ratios Affine: Preserves parallelism and the length ratios of parallel lines Projective: Preserves colinearity Topological: Preserves neighborhood relations and the number of holes Euclidean SimilaritAffine Nonaccidental Properties ProjectivTopologiCatastrophe 1. Smooth Continuation (Projective) Straight or curved 2. Cotermination (topological) L, Y, arrow, T 3. Parallelism (Affine) 4) Describe three different data structures that can be used to represent properties of the physical  environment. Provide an example for each. Possible Data Structures Bags of Features generic features nameable features Feature Maps Labeled Graphs 5) List four biases that can influence the perceptual interpretation of visual images. And describe a  perceptual phenomenon that demonstrates each one. In order to resolve projective ambiguities, human observers are biased to perceive the interpretation that is  statistically most likely in the natural environment.  There are many different biases that can influence the perception of 3D scenes.  For example, Unless there is information to the contrary, objects will be perceived as resting on the ground. There is a strong bias to interpret scenes such that depth increases with height in the viewing plane. Convex interpretations are preferred over concave ones. Interpretations involving generic views are preferred over those that require a specific vantage point.  There is a strong bias to perceive objects in contact with the ground unless there is clear evidence to the  contrary, Information from shadows or indirect illumination can override the bias to perceive objects to be in contact  with the ground There is a strong bias to interpret scenes such that depth increases with height in the viewing plane. Convex interpretations are preferred over concave ones. Interpretations involving generic views are preferred over those that require a specific vantage point.  6) What are non­accidental properties? Provide three examples. Nonaccidental Properties – are properties of an image such as co­linearity, co­termination or  parallelism that seldom occur by accident within optical projections. Thus, if lines in an image are parallel  (or co­terminate), they will be interpreted perceptually as if they are parallel (or co­terminating) in the 3D  environment. 1. Smooth Continuation (straight and curved) 2. Cotermination (L, Y, T and arrow) 3. Parallelism 4. Symmetry 7) What is anamorphic art? Describe two examples. An anamorphosis is a distorted projection or perspective; especially an image distorted in such a way  that it becomes visible only when viewed in a special manner. "Ana ­ morphosis" are Greek words meaning  "formed again."  Examples: The thumb (and eye) that forms on the cylinder.  Julian Beever, English chalk artist, draws images to make them
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 5606

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit