Study Guides (248,151)
United States (123,290)
Psychology (242)
All (4)
Midterm

High Level Vision [Notes - EXAM 3] -- I 4.0ed this exam

7 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 5606
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Exam 3 Vision 03/20/2014 1) What is the ratio principle proposed by Wallach (1948)? Describe two demonstrations to show that this  cannot provide a complete account of lightness constancy. Wallach (1948), presented observers with two disk/annulus displays with different illuminations. He found  that disks of different luminance appear equal in lightness as long as the disk/annulus luminance ratios are  equal. The luminance ratio between two surface patches with the same illumination is a useful source of  information for estimating their relative reflectance because the ratio is unaffected by the magnitude of  illumination. Following Wallach’s experiments, it was generally believed that lateral inhibition provides the mechanism for  measuring luminance ratios, and that lightness constancy is a real world manifestation of the classic  phenomenon of simultaneous contrast. Simultaneous Lightness Contrast: The right square appears darker because cells with receptive  fields near its border receive less inhibition from the surround.   Hermann Grid: Spots do not appear at the fixated junctions because receptive fields in the fovea are  smaller than in more peripheral regions. Cells with receptive fields at the junction receive more inhibition, so  that the junctions appear darker. 2) How does vertex structure influence the perception of transparency? Give two examples. Vertices can help determine whether luminance differences are due to reflectance or illumination Transparency – Different types of X vertices Type 1 – Either of the two large squares can appear transparent Type 2 – Only the lower right square can appear transparent Type 3 – There is no possible transparent interpretation The red arrows show the ordering of luminance around the vertex from lowest to highest The pattern of X vertices indicates that the region on the left is a transparent layer, whereas the one on the  right is not. Although both regions have the same luminance, the left one has a foggy appearance arising  from the perceived transparency.    3) What is the lightness constancy problem? How can information about 3D structure be used to help solve  it? Give two examples. The luminance ratio between two surface patches with the same illumination is a useful source of  information for estimating their relative reflectance because the ratio is unaffected by the magnitude of  illumination. Note, however, that this strategy is only valid if the surface patches to be compared have the same  illumination, and illumination can vary greatly in different parts of a scene. Thus it is necessary to have some sort of grouping mechanism that can isolate different parts of a scene  that share the same illumination. Perceived lightness can then be determined by the relative luminances  within each group.  The Shadow­Checker Effect: In this case the regions in shadow are considered as one group, and  the regions not in the shadow are considered as another. Note that A is the darkest region within its group,  while B is the lightest region within the shadow.  The two regions appear to have different colors, even  though they have the same luminance.  Computational Models of 3D Shape from Shading  Assume surfaces have matte reflectance (i.e. there are no specular highlights and no effects of  transparency or translucency Assume that all surface regions are illuminated homogeneously from a single direction (i.e. there are no  shadows or indirect reflections) Even with those assumptions, a pattern of shading does not allow a unique 3D interpretation 4) What is the bas­relief ambiguity? Describe an experiment that demonstrates this ambiguity in human  perception. Bas­relief is a type of sculpture that has less depth to the faces and figures than they actually have, when  measured proportionately (to scale). This technique retains the natural contours of the figures, and allows  the work to be viewed from many angles without distortion of the figures themselves. Bas­Reliefe Ambiguity Proposition: For a given pattern of image shading there is an infinite number possible surface  interpretations that are all related by an affine transformation. Koenderink, Van Doorn, Kappers & Todd (2003) Two experiments are reported in which we examined the ability of observers to identify landmarks on  surfaces from different vantage points. In Experiment 1, observers were asked to mark the local maxima  and minima of surface depth, whereas in Experiment 2, they were asked to mark the ridges and valleys on  a surface. In both experiments, the marked locations were consistent across different observers and  remained reliably stable over different viewing directions.  These findings indicate that randomly generated smooth surface patches contain perceptually salient  landmarks that have a high degree of viewpoint invariance. Implications of these findings are considered for  the recognition of smooth surface patches and for the depiction of such surfaces in line drawings. 5) Describe an experiment in which observers made judgments about the structure of the light field for  different types of illumination. What were the results of this study? Koenderink, Pont, van Doorn, Kappers & Todd (2007) Each scene containe
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 5606

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit