Study Guides (248,169)
United States (123,294)
Psychology (252)
PSYCH 100 (85)
Dr.Love (4)
Final

Psych exam

11 Pages
68 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 100
Professor
Dr.Love
Semester
Fall

Description
Psych Study Guide Chapter 1 Psychology­ scientific study of behavior and mental processes. ­Behavior: includes all of our outward or overt actions and reactions, such as talking,  facial expressions, and movement. ­Mental processes: all internal, convert activity of our minds, such as thinking, feeling,  and remembering. Psychology’s Goals ­Four goals that can aim at uncovering the mysteries of human and animal behavior:  description, explanation, prediction, and control. 1.Description: involves observing behavior and noting everything about it: what is  happening, where it happens, and whom it happens, and under what circumstances it  seems to happen. 2.Explanation: finding explanations for behavior is a very important step in the process  of forming theories of behavior. Goal of explanation is to help build theory. ­Theory: a general explanation of a set of observations or facts.  3.Predicition: determining what will happen in the future. 4.Control: focus of control, or modification of some behavior, is to change a behavior  from an undesirable one to a desirable one. History of Psychology ­Head Vs Heart Practices of early Egyptians suggest that the heart was seen more important than the  brain. ­Trepanation: Early Egyptians drill a hole in your head to find out what diseases  were wrong with you. ­Aristotle: wrote about the relationship of the soul to the body, followed the cardiac  hypothesis of reasoning (all thinking is from the heart). Heart was hotter than brain, temperature correlates to how complex you  can think and brain regulates temperature flow. ­Plato: felt soul could exist separately from the body (dualism) Tripartite theory of reasoning: 3 organs: 1. Brain: important for rational thinking 2. Heart: anger, fear, pry, courage 3. Liver/gut: irrational emotional thinking  (greed/lust) ­Hippocrates: followed a medical model to explain mental illness known as the  Humoral Theory. Involved fluids of the body: blood, flem, bile (yellow  and black). Ex. if someone is depressed, too much black bile. Takes the side of the brain (believed it was the major control center) ­Claude de Galen: Surgeon to the gladiators Stated brain was the central organ of cognition Ventricular Theory: particular areas in your brain are the seats of  reasoning. (ventricles) Localization VS Holism (brain functions as a whole or split up into different parts) ­Rene Descartes: French philosopher and mathematics teacher agreed with Plato  and believed that the pineal gland (small organ at base of brain) was the  seat of the soul. Believed in a dualism approach. ­Franz Joseph Gall: Phrenology­skull features represent underlying brain  development. Mapped out 27 different faculties of thought, very poor methodology. ­Marie Jean Pierre Flourens: hired by French Government to prove Gall wrong,  conducted experiment on pigeons to support holism (unlike  Gall), and proved him wrong. ­Gustav Fritsch and Edward Hitzig: experimentation with motor cortex of dogs (see  what would happen when they stimulated different  parts of the brain. ­Paul Broca: published a case of patient “Tan” (language difficulties and suffered left  hemisphere damage). Presented Tan’s brain to show localization damage, we speak with the left  hemisphere. War of Soups and Sparks: individual cells in nervous system ­Luigi Galvani: discovered bio­electricity accidentally using frog legs hung on brass  hooks of an iron railing, and electrical current caused movement in frog  legs. Believed muscles contained “animal electricity” ­Giovanni Aldini and Andrew Ure: raising the dead ­Otto Loewi: experimented with frogs hearts to demonstrate a chemical interaction  between nerves. Discovery of first neurotransmitter. ­Wilhelm Wundt: a physiologist, attempted to apply scientific principles to the study  of the human mind.  First psychology lab in 1879p ▯ sychology became an official study . Believed that the mind was made up of thoughts, experiences, emotions,  and other basic elements. Objective introspection­process of objectively examining and measuring  one’s own thoughts and mental activities.  ­Edward Titchener: one of Wundt’s students Structuralism: the focus of study was the structure of the mind Believed that every experience could be broken down into its  individual emotions and sensations. Believed that objective introspection could be used on thoughts as well as  physical sensations. “Tell me what comes to mind when you see this object” ­William James: First American Psychologist, began teaching anatomy and  physiology, but then moved onto teaching psychology exclusively.  More interested in the importance of consciousness to everyday life rather  than just the analysis of it. Conscious ideas are constantly flowing in an ever­changing stream, and  once you start thinking about what you were just thinking about, what you  were thinking about is no longer what you were thinking about, it’s what  you are thinking about.  Focused on how mind allows people to function in the real world (how  people play, work, and adapt to their surroundings: functionalism) Influenced by Darwin. What is Psychoanalysis? ­Sigmund Freud: neurologist in the late 18  century Vienna Associated with using cocaine (used to treat morphine addiction at the  time), prescribed it to his patients Psychoanalysis: insight or therapy for fear and anxiety. See how early experiences effect how we behave, if we could be unaware  of it. Personality was formed in the first 6 years of life. Unconscious level: not aware of it’s influence, and we push all of our  threatening urges and desires into that place. Repressed urges in trying to  surface created the nervous disorders in patients. Psychotherapy: process in which a trained psychological  professional  helps a person gain insights into and change  his or her behavior. Behaviorism: behaviorists want nothing to do with the mind, just how you behave.  How to change behavior by manipulating the situation Reward + Punishment ­Ivan Pavlov: Russian physiologist who worked with dogs to show that reflex  (involuntary action) (ex. salivation) could be caused to occur in response  to a totally new and formerly unrelated stimulus.  Conditioning: a learned reflexive response ­John B. Watson: challenged the functionalist viewpoint with behaviorism  ignore the whole “consciousness” issue and focus on observable  behavior (can be directly seen and measured) Believed that behavior is learned, no stemmed from unconscious  motives (Freud’s belief) Wanted to prove that all behavior was a result of a stimulus­response  relationship such as that described by Pavlov. ­B.F Skinner: operant conditioning: theory of how voluntary behavior is learned.  Behavior responses that are followed by pleasurable consequences are  strengthened. Psychology now Modern Perspectives: ­Sociocultural: relationship between social behavior and cultural. Two areas are related in that they are both about the effect that people  have on one another, either individually or in larger group, such as culture. ­Humanistic: people have the freedom to choose their own destiny (positive  psychology) ­Biopsychological: attribute human and animal behavior to biological events (brain) Hormones, heredity, brain chemicals, tumors, and diseases are some  of the biological causes of behavior and mental events. ­Cognitive: aspects of mental processing. Memory, intelligence, perception, problem  solving, etc. Cognitive perspective: focus on memory, intelligence, perception,  thought processes, problem solving, language, and  learning. Executive Function: inhibition of impulse, selective attention,  concept formation, activation of behavior, cognitive  flexibility, planning of goals. ­Evolutionary: through the process of natural selection, how certain processes have  developed in aid to survival.  Seeks to explain general mental strategies and traits, such as why we  lie, and how attractiveness influences mate selection, why fear of snakes is  so universal, and why people like music and dancing, among many others. ­Psychodynamic perspective: focus on the unconscious mind and its influence over  conscious behavior and on early childhood experiences, but  with less of an emphasis on sex and sexual motivations,  and more emphasis on development of a sense of self and  the discovery of other motivations behind a person’s  behavior.  Psychology Research Methods ­Scientific Method: 5 Steps 1. Perceive (observe): step derived from the goal of description: What is going on here? 2. Hypothesize: form an educated guess 3. Test: test hypothesis 4. Draw Conclusions: after testing hypothesis, find out if your hypothesis was supported  or not. 5. Report/Revise/Replicate: write up exactly what you did and how you did it so that  others can learn from what you accomplished or failed to. ­Theory: an organized set of principles that will describe, predict, and explain some  phenomenon.  ­Hypothesis: a specific testable prediction often derived from a theory. ­Hans Eyseck’s Theory of Personality: 3 Main dimensions to personality Extroversion­introversion trait varies on optimal  arousal level for performance. (Extro: social Intro:  shy) Specific Hypothesis: “introverts will be more  sensitive to lemon juice than extroverts” ­Population: Random representative sample, make it representative of everyone ­Sample: randomly selected sample of subjects from a larger population of subjects. Methods for Describing ­Naturalistic Observation: watch people/animals behave in their normal  environment. Advantages: Cheap, real world Disadvantages: can’t manipulate the situation, only know what  you see, can’t see cause and effect, observer effect  (people act differently when they know someone’s  watching.), observer bias(person doing the  observing has a particular opinion about what  he/she is going to see or expects to see) ­Participant Observation: Rosenhan, “being sane in insane places” Researchers become participants in a group. ­Laboratory Observation: Advantages: a lot more control of experiment Disadvantages: not the actual real world/situation ­Case Studies: a type of research that involves making in depth observations of  individual persons (very in depth, gather a lot of info) Disadvantage: can’t apply to other people (can’t assume that the same  experiences effect people the same visa versa) Example of Case control: Genie the Wild Child: rescued her because she  was trapped in her house, she was mute, tested whether or not she could  still learn language ­Surveys: research method that involves interviewing or giving questionnaires to a  large number of people. Advantages: easy to get data Disadvantages: people aren’t always truthful. Correlation Designs ­Correlation: a measure of the relationship between 2 variables, represented by “r” Show patterns, not causes ­Variable: anything that can change or vary. ­Correlation Coefficient: represents the direction of the relationship and it’s  strength.  ­Positive Correlation: variables related in the same direction ­Negative Correlation: variables related in th
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit