Exam 2 Outline.docx

13 Pages
41 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 100
Professor
Greg Loviscky
Semester
Fall

Description
Psych 100 Exam 2 Outline Dr. Lovisky Psychological Development During Childhood  • What role do caregivers play in the development of children? o The Pre­Wired baby  Reflexes: involuntary behaviors that healthy babies perform  • Grasping • Startle (moro)  • Rooting  Perceptual Abilities • Distinguish face patterns, preferences for patterns o Two paddles, each with three dots  Two on top one on bottom (tends to get  more of a reaction because it looks like a  face)  One on top two on bottom o Gibson & Walk’s Visual Cliff  Mobile babies 6­14 months encounter drop­ off  Caregiver on other side of drop­off  Most babies do not go to caregiver   If caregiver made a scared face, the baby  was less likely to proceed  If caregiver smiled/looked happy, the baby  was less likely to proceed  Is babies’ depth perception innate or  learned? • We can’t tell based on this research,  because chances are this is not the  first time these kids are crawling so  they have probably fallen before and  have learned o Attachment  Contact Comfort: being touched and held • Benefits of attachment o Caregiver provides secure base  Explore environment  Safe haven to return to when afraid • Lack of attachment o Harlow’s monkeys  Both mothers made of wire, one with wire  and a bottle filled with milk, other with a  cloth covering (cloth preferred)   Cloth mother: nearly all of the time,  especially when frightened  Wire mother: when in need of sustenance  Separation & Security • Strange situation o Separation from caregiver  o Left in unfamiliar setting with stranger  o Reaction when with caregiver, when caregiver  leaves, and when caregiver returns  • Levels of attachment o Secure attachment  When caregiver present: explores, “touches  base”  When caregiver leaves: cries and protests  When caregiver returns: calms down and  returns to play o Insecure attachment  Avoidant  • When caregiver present: explores,  does not “touch base” • When caregiver leaves: doesn’t react • When caregiver returns: doesn’t  react  Ambivalent  When caregiver present: doesn’t  explor  When caregiver leaves: cries   When caregiver returns: angry • Cries to be picked up  • Does NOT calm down  • Possible causes of Insecure Attachment o Need to be the perfect parent?  If caregiver isn’t perfectly sensitive and  responsive then will the baby have an  insecure attachment? o Parenting styles  Permissive/neglect • Let kids do what they want until it  interferes with what the parents want  Permissive Indulgent 2 • Submit to their children’s desires • Make few demands, limitations • Use little punishment  Authoritarian  • Impose rules and expect obedience  Authoritative • Both demanding and responsive • Set rules and enforce them • Provide explanations and encourage  discussion o Children with highest self­esteem, self­reliance, and  social competence have parents who are  Authoritative   Caution: based on correlational research • Possible causes of insecure attachment o Problematic parenting  Abandonment/deprivation in first two years  Abusive, neglectful, or erratic parenting  o Child’s temperament  Difficult babies – unhappy, irregular  schedule o Stressful circumstances  Financial difficulties, family health  problems, etc.  • How do psychologists describe how children think? o Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development  Jean Piaget • Developed intelligence/cognitive ability tests  Schemas – mental categories • Assimilation o Determine how new information assimilates into  existing mental categories (recognize things  because they are SIMilar) • Accommodation o Determine how mental categories must change to  accommodate new information (MODify things  based on what they really are) o Children can create new schemas if existing  schemas are inadequate o Developmental Stages According to Piaget’s Theory  Sensorimotor Stage (ages 0­2) • Voluntary behaviors to interact with world around them  (ex. Hold head up, roll over, sit up) 3 • Object permanence: the understanding that something  exists even if you can’t see or touch it   Preoperational Stage (ages 2­7) • Use of symbols and language increases (pretend play)  • Animism  o Conceiving inanimate objects as if they were living  • Egocentrism o The inability to se the world through anyone else’s  eyes  • Conservation o Physical properties do not change when their form  or appearance changes   Concrete Operations Stage (7­12) • Patterns, order, cause + effect, basic math • Serration  o Put objects in order • Tangible objects, concrete, must experience it  • Still make errors about abstract things o Greg is taller than Earl o Ralph is taller than Greg o Who is tallest?  Ralph  Formal Operations Stage (12­adulthood) • Capable of abstract reasoning o Comparison and classification of ideas  “Which society is more democratic?” o Able to reason about abstract ideas  “What is love?” o Able to reason about hypothetical situations  “What would you do if…?”  Current views of Cognitive Development • Cognitive development is continuous so it is not dependent  on discrete steps/stages  • Piaget did not take individual differences into consideration o Some kids realize better • Kids, in general, may advance more quickly than he  thought o Ex. Pre­operational stage kids can overcome  egocentrism and object permanence earlier than  thought  Psychological Development Across a Lifespan  4 • Right vs. Wrong  o Increases in ability to perform abstract reasoning enable people to have  more complex ideas of right vs. wrong   Detect inconsistencies in others’ reasoning  Identify  • Lawrence Kohlberg o Posed moral dilemmas to kids, teens, and adults   Only used men, limited  o Asked them what they would do in the situation  o More importantly – asked why they would do it  Rationales were different:  • Kohlberg created his theory of moral judgment o Pre­Conventional Reasoning  Self­centered: what’s in if for me? • Stage 1 ­ concern is to avoid punishment o Heinz shouldn’t steal it because he could go to jail • Stage 2 ­ concern is to get reward  o Heinz should steal it because he would be happier if  wife is alive o Conventional Reasoning  Other­centered: I look to others to figure out what’s right/wrong or  good/bad • Stage 3 ­ concern is to get approval from people close to  you (peer pressure) o Heinz should steal it because family would never  forgive him if he allowed her to die • Stage 4 ­ concern is to obey rules (blindly) o Heinz shouldn’t steal because it’s against the law o Post­Conventional Reasoning  Society­centered: prioritizes what’s good for  • Stage 5 ­ concern is that rules/laws are flexible, and they  should be changed to make them more fair (social contract) o Heinz should steal it because the law protecting a  rich doctor isn’t important to follow when someone  is dying • Stage 6 ­ unwavering concern for following universal  ethical principles that should guide all people in all  situations (MLK) o Heinz should steal it because if he doesn’t Heinz is  saying that profiting from a drug is more important  than  • Moral Judgment may be influenced by:  o Verbal ability 5  Hardly everyone reached Stages 5 & 6 with interview method  Defining Issues Test – James Rest  Survey results in more people reaching Stages 5 & 6 (recognition  task) than in interviews (production task) o Context  Abstract dilemmas ­ people reason differently in real­life dilemmas  Managerial Moral Judgment Test ­ Loviscky, Trevino & Jacobs • Moral Feeling o Brain imaging reveals… o Less personal involvement – more thinking o More personal involvement – more emotion  Anterior cingulate; part of frontal lobe o Moral judgment is more than thinking, it’s feeling How we Develop Socially/Emotionally throughout our life? • Facing aging and death  o Terminally ill patients often experienced 5 stages as they coped with  impending death  1. Denial 2. Anger 3. Bargaining 4. Depression 5. Acceptance o No one “normal” or “correct” way to face death Perception • What is perception? o Sensation vs. Perception  Sensation • Stimulation of a sensory receptor produces neural impulses  that the brain interprets as a sound, visual image, odor, etc.  Perception • A process that makes sensory patterns meaningful • Draws on memory, motivation, emotion, and other  psychological processes  o Both Sensation and Perception pertain to all 5 senses  Our focus will be on visual perception • Bottom­Up vs. Top­Down Processing o Bottom­Up Processing  Progression from individual elements to the whole   Emphasizes characteristics of the stimulus   Bottom = stimulus 6 o Top­Down Processing  Progression from the whole to the elements   Emphasizes perceiver’s expectations, memories, and other  cognitive factors  Top = Mental set  o Example: Reading  Feature Analysis as Bottom­Up Processing • Focus on features of the stimulus (the letter ‘T’)  Contrast with Reading as Top­Down Processing • Learning, context, etc. en
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit