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[01:202:201] - Midterm Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam (28 pages long!)


Department
Criminal Justice
Course Code
01:202:201
Professor
Dr.Kristen Zgoba
Study Guide
Midterm

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Rutgers
01:202:201
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Criminal Justice Notes
Individual Rights Vs Public Order
Individual Rights Activists: seeks to protect personal freedoms within the
process of CJ
Puli Ode Atiists: eliee soiety’s iteests should take peedee
over individual rights under certain circumstances threating public safety
60s and 70s =civil rights era
guarantee rights of defendants and tries to understand the causes of
violence and crime
NOW: sees offender as a social predator and NOT as a victim
: Chelsea’s La passed y CA Senate
Justice: principle of fairness; the ideal of moral equity
Social Justice: right and wrong as defined by cultural beliefs and idea of
fairness
Civil Justice: under social justice, concerned with fairness in relationship
btwn citizens, gov agencies, and businesses in private matters
Criminal Justice: under social; concerned with violation of criminal law
3 Core Components:
The Police
Correctional Agencies
Criminal Courts
Consensus Model Vs Conflict Model
Consensus: social product of justice is achieved by all the parts of justice
system working together
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Conflict: justice results from conflict rather than communication since
components of the justice system work to serve their own interests
Stages of Criminal Processing:
. Iestigatio ad aest…
Investigation evidence
Warrant
Aest: if polie ae’t uestioig, they do’t hae to ead Miada
rights
Booking
Miranda Warnings:
Miranda V. Arizona (1966)
Read when person is first arrested
Anything suspect says after they are read can be used against
them
What happens after first arrest
Booking
First appearance
Formally notified of the charges against them
Advised of their rights
Given opportunity to have lawyer present
May be afforded opportunity of bail
Preliminary hearing
Occurs before a judicial official (Judge)
Allos defese to deteie poseutio’s ase’s stegth
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