Study Guides (380,000)
US (220,000)
Rutgers (3,000)
7:17 (60)
Study Guide

01:377:370 Study Guide - Spring 2019, Comprehensive Final Exam Notes - Metabolism, Protein, Oxygen


Department
Exercise Scienc
Course Code
01:377:370
Professor
S Arent
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 34 pages of the document.
01:377:370

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

- Obesity resembles a relative state of leptin resistance similar
to obesity related insulin resistance
Obesity: Couch Potato Syndrome
- Physical activity inactivity - crucial component in excessive fat accumulation
- Activity inversely related to BF level
- Benefits of increased energy output with aging
- Increased BW as you age not completely explained by
calories
- Some BF gain even if exercising and eating same as
before
- PA won’t completely prevent age related changes in body
composition, but it can help preserve lean mass and limit BF
gains through caloric expenditure
- Requires greater amount of exercise to do this
- Impact on metabolism
- Recover is slower but we need to work more
The Cost of Obesity
- Health risks of excessive body fat
- Obesity is 2nd leading cause of preventable death in America (1st
is smoking). “Overweight’ is now 7th.
- Hypertension, elevated Blood Sugar, elevated TC and
LDL, lower HDL heighten risks being overweight
- Physical fitness can help -- even if still overweight
- An economic burden:
- Estimated health care cost: $147 billion
- Burden particularly pronounced for mature women
- Reduced net-worth compared to non-obese counterparts
- Health costs? Attractiveness in workplace issues?
- Excessive fatness in childhood and adolescence predicts adverse health effects
in adulthood
Specific health risks
- Hypertension
- Heart disease/heart attack
- Stroke
- Renal disease
- Type II diabetes
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

- Osteoarthritis
- Sleep apnea
- Osteoporosis
- Cancer -- endometrial, breast,colon
- Elevated plasma lipids
- Gallbladder disease
- Menstrual irregularities
- emotional/social/psychological problems
How fat is “too fat”?
- Percentage body fat is associated with obesity
- Children >/- 85th percentile = overweight; >/- 95th = obese
- Young men > 25% body fat
- Young women >33-38% body fat
- Regional fat distribution: its not just how much you carry but where you carry it
- Central (apple-shaped/android obesity)
- Associated with the most health issues
- Increased risk of heart disease, insulin resistance, type II
diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis (hardening of
arteries)
- Greatest risk: women >35 in waist; Men > 40 in waist
- Peripheral (pear-shaped/gynoid obesity)
- Increase risk of heart disease for women after menopause because they
become apple shaped
- NIH suggests weight loss for anyone with BMI >/- 25
- Weight loss is also recommended if abdomen girth is >/- 40 in men and >/- 35
inches in women
Obesity and Lipoprotein Lipase
- Lipoprotein lipase affects body fat distribution
- Facilitates triglyceride uptake and storage by adipocytes
- LPL plays a role in gender differences in fat patterning
- Females have greater LPL activity in hips, thighs, buttocks\
- Estrogen exacerbates these effects
- Males have higher LPL activity in abdomen
The Role of Adipocytes
- Effects of weight loss
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version