Study Guides (390,000)
US (220,000)
Rutgers (3,000)
14:50 (600)
Study Guide

01:830:338 Study Guide - Comprehensive Midterm Guide: Sensation Seeking, Hans Eysenck, Psychoticism


Department
Psychology
Course Code
01:830:338
Professor
Professor Lyra Stein
Study Guide
Midterm

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 13 pages of the document.
Rutgers
01:830:338
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

INTRODUCTION TO PERSONALITY PSYCHOLOGY
What is Personality?
Pattern of relatively permanent traits and unique characteristics that give both consistency
and individuality to a person’s behavior
Set of psychological traits and mechanisms within the individual that are organized
and relatively enduring and that influence his or her interactions with, and adaptations
to, the intrapsychic, physical, and social environments
Traits characteristics that describe ways in which people are different from each other
What are traits useful?
Describe people and help understand differences between people
Explain behavior
Predict future behavior
Personality Traits- Important Questions
How many traits are there?
How are the traits organized?
What are the origins of traits?
What are the correlations and consequences of traits?
Personality is within the individual
Traits are:
Relatively enduring
Consistent across time
Consistent across situations
However, some situations may overpower the role of personality in predicting behavior
The Person and the Situation
Is our behavior shaped by the situation or by our internal personality traits?
Person-situation debate
Personality psychologists how do people typically respond to environmental demands?
Perspectives on Personality
Trait
Biological
The self
Psychodynamic
Motives
Learning
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Lecture 2- Assessment and Methods
How do you measure personality? à It is difficult to measure when there are so many different
methods, approaches, etc.
1. S-data: self-report (specifically asking the person about themselves)
-simple, cheap. S-data and O-data agree with a lot of ideas
-Unstructured or structured
-Unstructured: open ended
-Allows respondents to structure their answers freely (ex: Twenty Statements
Test: “I am ____” nice, tired, etc) à Woman who are married say “I am a wife”;
Students in college talk about their social group
-Coding à Difficulty is that how do you code these results? à The things that
you say first are the most essential to you. (How many times do students talk
about their social group to describe themselves?)
-Structured: close-ended (T/F, Rate 1-5, interview, questionnaire, survey, etc)
-Requires respondents to answer within an imposed structure (ex: Does this
trait describe you?)
Likert Rating Scale: typically 5-7 response alternatives with the end-points
labeled to define the extremes
-Coding doesn’t come an issue because there are numbers
-self-report questionnaires in the form of statements
NEO PI: the most common to measure the Big Five -“I like most people I meet
(1-5 Likert scale)
Experience Sampling: measures patterns of behavior
-participants provide data one or more times a day for an extended period of time
-People have best moods on Friday and Saturday; worst mood Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
-Extroverts: don’t follow a pattern à external factors influence their mood but those factors
depends
-Introverts: patterned because of internal factors
ISSUES with using S-data
Response set: pattern of individual responses to questions that is not related to the
content of the question
Acquiescence response set: tendency to agree with items regardless of content
à To avoid this, you can rephrase the question “I’m shy” à “I feel uncomfortable
in social setting” to see if the responder is really reading or not because people
can’t agree both socially uncomfortable and “love parties”
Social desirability bias: participants tend to say what they believes is expected
to them (exaggerate their responses that talk about themselves à To avoid:
make it anonymous)
Extreme responding: tendency to give endpoint responses.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version