COMM 10123- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 29 pages long!)

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Published on 28 Mar 2018
School
TCU
Department
Communication Studies
Course
COMM 10123
Professor
TCU
COMM 10123
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
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COMM 10123-Chapter 1
Introduction to Communication
Chapter 1
The Power of Public Speaking
Those who do it well are highly compensated for it.
Companies want it in employees; the ability to communicate effectively is vital and
communication skills ranked #1 for career development.
Look at the survey from the text regarding the importance placed on communication
skills from the 480 companies surveyed
It becomes a foundation for civil life as well as our working world; something we truly
cannot escape.
Gives you a sense of empowerment—a sense of confidence and ability to “make a
difference” when you learn some of the basic skills. Learning how to do something
that can not only benefit you in your career, but also adds to your self-esteem as an
individual
Research says that we spend about 30% of our waking time in some kind of
conversation. I suspect with what I see regarding cell phone and/or text messaging in
the halls of this building that number is considerably higher for some.
Benefits of Communication
Personal Benefitscommunication is not a one-size-fits-all concept; the better
we can communicate in a variety of settings, the more successful we will be. Can help
us in our interpersonal relationships, in our classes here at TCU, and more.
Professional Benefitsas noted above, companies look for effective
communicators to hire. Not just public speakers, but rather people who have solid
interpersonal, group, etc. A 4.0 GPA with substandard communication skills is less
attractive to most employers than a 2.75 GPA and strong, effective skills.
Social Benefitseffective communication skills help us on our civic life too.
Unless we can think and communicate critically, we are subject to being taken
advantage of by others. Some day you may be called to sit on a jury in a court of law.
You will need the ability to think critically.
The Communication Process
The People/Speakerthis is the first step in the process; the success of your message
depends on your credibility or trustworthiness. Your ethos or credibility is vital. If an
audience distrusts the messenger, the message will not be heard or evaluated. We will
talk about what you should and should “not” do to ensure this first step is a positive one.
Every audience member brings his or her own frame of reference; or sum total of their
life’s experiences. The more our audience shares a frame of reference similar to our
own, the easier it is to effectively communicate with them. In all cases we must analyze
our audience (Chapter 6) before we can fully organize, develop, and present our speech.
The Messagewhat you have to say. The key is to find a way to make your intended
message be what is actually communicated or received by the audience. It is not good
enough to merely have good intentions. An effective communicator makes every effort to
have the audience understand the message the way it was intended. Be careful with the
words you choose. Sometimes we try our best but what we say is not what our audience
hears. Messages are both oral (spoken) or nonverbal (gestures, facial expressions,
movement, etc.). Both are essential for effective communication but each can lead to
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COMM 10123-Chapter 1
confusion or misunderstanding if an audience does not interpret the message the way
the speaker had intended.
The ChannelMessages can be delivered via many channels such as e-mail,
telephone, texting, Twitter, letter, billboard, etc. But the only one relevant to public
speaking is face-to-face. To communicate effectively using this channel we need certain
skills not needed with other channels.
Texting is Turning into Serious Business (not in your textbook)
About 25% of all employees use text messages for routine business
communication. This number is expected to grow in the coming years.
People take for granted that they can communicate at work the same way they
communicate with their friends. That is not the case.
As a result, rules are starting to emerge to govern effective texting in the
workplace:
1. Respect Boundariesin other words, sending a text after work hours
should be limited to items that need urgent attention.
2. Follow the Leaderwatch how your boss or bosses text. Do they use
proper grammar and punctuation or is it more haphazard? Whichever the
case, you should do the same.
3. Keep it Short—If you can’t keep it to a few lines (or less) then maybe the
text is not the best channel to use for the message.
4. Abbreviate, within Reason—it’s fine to abbreviate on traditional items, but
hold off on such things like “cu L8r.”
5. Skip the Funny Stuff—don’t use emoji. And don’t try to be a comedian as
that raises the chance of you being misinterpreted.
Interference (Noise)this is anything that interferes with the intended message. Noise
can be external, internal, or semantic.
A. Externalstimuli that affect our ability to pay attention to the speaker. Things like
other voices, television sets, stereos, loud fans, etc. Easy to recognize and
generally easy to control.
B. Internal—stimuli from ourselves; occurring in our mind…often referred to as “day
dreaming.” Often hard to recognize and hard to control. Audience members
have to concentrate on the speaker and the speaker must ensure the message is
meaningful to the audience. There is a 50-50 or mutual responsibility for
controlling or minimizing internal noise.
C. Semantic—similar to internal; but semantic refers to “word” noise or interference
that causes us to stop paying attention. Calling someone a “boy” or “girl” when
they are a man or a woman might create this type of noise. It is very personal
and very subjective.
Feedbackthe message the audience gives the speaker; either verbal or nonverbal. We
need feedback to determine if our message was received. Speakers notice audience
feedback, so as an audience member we have a responsibility to respond with respect
when listening to a message. (see attached article on feedback at the end of the
chapter lecture notes)
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Document Summary

I suspect with what i see regarding cell phone and/or text messaging in the halls of this building that number is considerably higher for some. Social benefits effective communication skills help us on our civic life too. Personal benefits communication is not a one-size-fits-all concept; the better we can communicate in a variety of settings, the more successful we will be. Can help us in our interpersonal relationships, in our classes here at tcu, and more. Professional benefits as noted above, companies look for effective communicators to hire. Not just public speakers, but rather people who have solid interpersonal, group, etc. A 4. 0 gpa with substandard communication skills is less attractive to most employers than a 2. 75 gpa and strong, effective skills. Unless we can think and communicate critically, we are subject to being taken advantage of by others. Some day you may be called to sit on a jury in a court of law.