Study Guides (248,236)
United States (123,300)
Psychology (413)
PSY 101 (91)
Midterm

PSY 101 Study Guide Exam 4

8 Pages
103 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 101
Professor
Professor Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
PSY 101 Study Guide Exam #4  Personality Personality: a person’s unique, complex, set of psychological qualities Five Factor Model: five broad psychological dimensions – each to collectively represent  a single type of personality; each dimension has two poles, at each end is an opposing  characteristic of the dimension  1. Extroversion: energetic, talkative, assertive vs. quiet, reserved, shy  (introversion) 2. Agreeableness: sympathetic, kind, affectionate vs. cold, cruel, confrontational 3. Conscientiousness: organized, intellectual, open­minded vs. easy­going,  careless, irresponsible  4. Neuroticism: stable, contended, oriented vs. anxious, irritable, temperamental 5. Openness to Experience: creative, adventurous vs. simple, shallow, resistant  to change  Traits: enduring personal qualities that characterize behavior across situations – run  along continuous dimensions that describe patterns of observed behavior (The Five  Factor Model)  Id: the unconscious, governed by the “pleasure principle” – seeking immediate  gratification devoid of rationality  Superego: The “conscience” of the mind; moral attitudes and values Ego: the conscious mind – governed by the “reality principle,” self­ preservation by  conscious executive (decision maker); acts as the mediator between superego and id Defense Mechanisms – working to avoid threatening impulses/ideas in the ego Denial: protecting self from unpleasant truths by refusing to acknowledge that the event  took place; denying the truth despite available evidence Displacement: lashing out to release pent­up hostilities on objects or persons not  affiliated with the initial emotional event – blaming others for own struggles  Fantasy: awarding oneself with imaginary achievements in order to gratify desires that  have been a source of frustration – over­claiming successes despite falling short of  goals/standards Projection: ignoring one’s own feelings about the world and behaving as if those  feelings belong to someone else or some other group (ex: husband having thoughts of  wife cheating, then blaming the wife for having those thoughts when in reality, the  thoughts were in his head, not hers)  Reaction Formation: endorsing attitudes and behaviors that are inconsistent with own  desires in an attempt to prevent own desires from being expressed  (ex: a person who has  anxiety regarding what others may think about them may outwardly exaggerate judging  behavior in attempt to conceal or counteract anxiety); similar in cases of fear, hate,  controlling behavior, etc.  Regression: reverting or retreating back to previously surmounted developmental levels  in an attempt to avoid dealing with frustrations that have become overwhelming (ex:  Michael Jackson building Neverland Ranch – never got to experience a childhood, so he  built an amusement park to let kids enjoy it) Repression: process by which disturbing thoughts or painful memories are pushed back  and forced to remain out of consciousness (ex: children subject or witness to abuse may  repress memories of those events)  Self­Handicapping Behavior: minimizing the attribution of lack of ability as the reason  for failure – gives some other reason instead (ex: expecting to do poorly on an exam, then  staying out all night before the exam, and then blaming your bad grade on lack of effort  rather than lack of ability)  Abnormal Psychology  Criteria for Abnormality ­ Distress, mal­adaptiveness, irrationality or unpredictability,  unconventionality or statistical rarity, observer discomfort, violation of moral or ideal  standards, grief (dependent on time frame) Common Systems Used for Diagnosis:  ­Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM­IV­TR) – primary  source in the US ­International Classification of Diseases (ICD­10) Comorbidity: the co­occurrence of disorders – an individual may experience more than  one disorder at one time  Major Classes of Disorders –  1. Developmental Disorders – early onset developmental disorders that generally are  characterized by:  ­learning deficits (mental retardation, ADHD, etc)  ­communication difficulties (autism, asperger’s, etc.)  ­Many levels of functioning across the spectrum – range from learning/social  complications to lack of motor skills  2. Anxiety Disorders – disorders generally classified by excessive psychological arousal,  strong feelings of physiological tension, intense apprehension (absent of reason) ­Symptoms may include phobias of certain objects/social situations, anxiety or  worry without apparent danger, post traumatic stress, obsessions and  compulsions, panic attacks/episodes, etc.  3. Mood Disorders – moods that persist for long periods of time and at extreme levels ­   a disturbance such as severe depression (major depressive disorder), or depression  alternating with mania (bipolar disorder)  ­Symptoms may include dysphoria (indifferent or discontent to life), melancholy,  sleep and/or concentration issues, appetite and motor activity issues, anhedonia (feeling  non­connected to life or “spaced out”), guilt, feelings of hopelessness, helplessness,  isolation, etc.  3. Personality Disorders – long term (chronic), inflexible, mal­adaptive patters of  behavior – typically leaving individuals with impaired ability to function in social and  interpersonal settings  ­Symptoms may include instability regarding self (identity, esteem, etc.) dramatic  attention seeking, narcissistic behavior, irresponsible behavior, turbulent emotional  swings, intensity regarding personal relationships  4. Dissociative Disorders – a disturbance of thinking, awareness, identity, consciousness,  or memory – lack of consistency regarding identity, total or partial loss of access to  knowledge about self, failure to integrate identity, memory, and consciousness  (dissociative identity disorder)  5. Schizophrenic Disorders – characterized by a breakdown of personality and  behavioral functioning (schizophrenia)  ­Symptoms may include withdrawal and emotional detachment, disturbed  thoughts and flattened affect, hallucinations (seeing events/things that don’t exist,  hearing voices that don’t exist), language issues (“word salad” – the person might speak  normally, but their sentences have no semantic meaning), erratic psychomotor behavior,  delusions (a belief held with strong conviction despite superior evidence to the contrary)  6. Eating Disorders – characterized by severe disturbances in eating behavior –  disturbance is in the perception of body size, shape, and weight  ­Anorexia: refusal to maintain minimal normal body weight  ­Bulimia: repeated episodes of binge eating followed by inappropriate  compensatory behaviors (self induced vomiting, fasting, excessive exercise, etc.) Psychological Therapies Diagnosis: A consistent and coherent diagnosis system should include:  ­common shorthand language (so any normal person could understand it) ­understanding of causality  ­treatment plan  Etiology: the causes, related factors, and development of a disorder Prognosis: estimating the treatment outcomes  Treatment: what you actually do to solve the issue or help ease the disease –  methodological approach  Biomedical Therapies: treatment that alters brain functioning by means of chemical or  physical interventions (pharmaceuticals, surgery, etc.)  Psychotherapy: focuses on changing faulty behaviors, thoughts, perceptions, and  emotions by means of clinical interventions  Types of Therapists/Professionals  Clinical social worker: typically has earned a MSW or some equivalent – often work in  collaboration with other mental health professionals to reach the best options for  treatment; specifically trained to consider the social contexts of people’s problems – may  become acquainted with home or work settings of those who seek help  Clinical Psychologist: required to have earned a PhD or PsyD and to have completed  supervised training in a clinical setting – specialized background in research, assessment,  and treatment of psychological problems  Counseling Psychologist: typically has earned a PhD or PsyD – concerned with  assessment and treatment, usually provides guidance to deal with school problems, drug  abuse, marital issues – similar to a clinical psychologist, but works within the community  settings related to their specialization (within a business, school, prison, etc.)  ­all cannot prescribe medication  Psychiatrist: required to have completed medical school training – an MD in addition to  training in mental and emotional disorders – extensive training in the biomedical basis of  psychological problems; able to prescribe pharmaceuticals as an approach to treatment  Deinstitutionalization: shift away from in­patient practices and towards out­patient  practices of treatment; allows people to carry on with their normal lives while still  receiving treatment for their disease  Psychoanalysis: originally developed by Freud; intensive, prolonged method for  exploring unconscious “inner” motivations – origin of talk therapy – client is assisted to  help identify relationships between reality and the mind  Insight therapy: used by therapist to guide the client – discover links between symptoms  of condition and past experiences Exposure Therapy: people learn to relax in circumstances that have made them highly  anxious in the past – individuals are made to confront the object or situation that  generates anxiety or fear  ­2 Primary Methods:  1. People are systematically desensitized to the anxiety­provoking  stimulus through gradual exposures over time  2. Anxiety extinguished by flooding exposure – thrust the person into the  anxiety­provoking situation and overwhelm them with the anxiety, but  they realize that there is no actual threat  Cognitive behavioral therapy: similar to behavior modification techniques  (reinforcement/punishment), but with the added cognitive 
More Less

Related notes for PSY 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit