Study Guides (248,215)
United States (123,294)
Psychology (413)
PSY 322 (19)
Final

ENG201 - Research Paper (draft final).docx

9 Pages
130 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 322
Professor
Cory Crane
Semester
Spring

Description
Sara Vasisko April 11, 2014 Research Paper English 201 – McLaughlin Stressed? You are standing on the ledge of the tallest building in the city. You can see the  clouds and all of the city lights surrounding you. Suddenly, someone from behind you  pushes you off the ledge and you feel yourself falling through the brisk air faster and  faster until abruptly you wake up in your own bed. Your heart is pounding and you can  feel the sweat dripping down your cold, chilled skin. You calm yourself down and realize  that it was all just a dream. You ask yourself, was that normal? Do other people have  these scary dreams where you feel like you cannot control what is going to happen?  These dreams occur quite often actually and they happen simply because of outside  stressors in one’s life. Stress in one’s life directly correlates with these bizarre dreams,  also known as anxiety dreams. When talking about the dreaming process as a whole, there are two specific  men that people usually think of: Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. Both of these men were  psychoanalysts that made huge discoveries by studying the unconscious mind and what  occurs during sleep. Freud defined the unconscious mind as repressed thoughts, feelings,  and memories. To Freud, the unconscious was the place that people held their socially  unacceptable ideas. However, sometimes the ideas held within the unconscious can slip  1 Vasisko out, also known as a Freudian slip or a tongue slip (Freud). Carl Jung worked off of  Freud’s ideas. However, he divided the unconscious mind into the personal unconscious  and the collective unconscious (Dream Moods). The personal unconscious contains all of  the ideas and thoughts that are forgotten or suppressed (Dream Moods). The collective  unconscious is a deeper level of the unconscious that holds “physic structures” and  “archetypal experiences” (Dream Moods). These men were both very intelligent and  worked off of each other’s ideas to create their own individual theories. They made a  huge impact on the world because at this point, no one had really discovered what the  root of dreaming was, or what it could potentially mean. th  In the late 19  century, Sigmund Freud was aiming to be a neurophysiologist,  but was unable to afford it. He instead opened up his own private practice and chose to  teach himself (Freud). Following the success of his career, he wrote a book entitled  Interpretations of Dreams. Although most of Freud’s theories were revolved around sex,  he did believe that human desire was closely linked to dreams (Freud). He theorized that  in order for humans to process traumatic events in life, one must have dreams to serve as  a blockage of thinking about these disturbances, which would otherwise disrupt sleep.   Things like unconscious desires and taboo thoughts would create stress and anxiety, so  dreams are used to recover from these stresses and ultimately letting it all out, like a way  of facing these events that occur in one’s life (Freud).  Freud suggested dreams were split into two sections; manifest content and  latent content. Manifest content is the actual images in ones dream. It’s also the material  that people can consciously remember what they dreamed about once they’ve awoken.  Latent content is composed of our distressing thoughts, which we do not recognize  2 [Type text] [Type text] [Type text] immediately (Freud). Both of these combined will help someone understand what they  are dreaming about and in hope to help understand exactly “why” they are dreaming  about a certain topic. When looking specifically at the anxiety­dream, much can be interpreted from  it. Freud believed that anxiety dreams don’t necessarily propose problems in dreaming,  but propose problems in understanding “neurotic anxiety” in general (Freud Chpt. 4).  In  order to understand an anxiety dream, one has to understand the basis of the anxiety and  where it might be coming from. In saying this, the anxiety can by explained by the dream  content. Once a person looks at the dream content, it will be easier to understand why the  anxiety­dream is apparent. Freud states that, “the anxiety is only fastened on to the idea  which accompanies it, and is derived from another source” (Freud Chpt. 4). This  statement explains that the anxiety­dreams that occur are attached to ideas and are not  just random, bizarre thoughts. This proves the idea that stress in one’s life is ultimately  effecting the person and their dreaming. th Carl Jung was a Swiss scholar in the 19  century. He initially studied medicine  in college, but being influenced by Sigmund Freud’s studies, changed his paths. After  having a spiritual revelation during college, he became interested in psychiatry. By  combining psychiatrics, Buddhism, Hinduism, and philosophy, Jung composed a book  about his ideas called The Red Book (Dream Moods). While working at a psychiatric  hospital, Jung sent a book copy of his studies to Freud, in hopes of mentorship. They  eventually met and from that connection built a friendship that would benefit each other  greatly. Freud’s intricate dream theories started to ware off onto Jung, but he did create  his own theories and they eventually split up (Dream Moods). He believed that dreams  3 Vasisko served as a spiritual guide. They provided answers to the problems in our lives. Stressors  in one’s life would be brought up into one’s dreams to help them understand why this  stressor is in their life. Like many other people, Jung did not agree with Freud’s strong  link between dreams and people’s unconscious sexual desires. He believed that dreams  focus on people’s relationships with themselves, and how they see themselves (Dream  Moods). Jung did separate this concept of interpretation into two parts, the conscious and  the unconscious mind. Jung believed that by balancing the conscious and the  unconscious, the meaning of dreams can be discovered. This is referred to as the process  of amplification (Dream Moods). In saying this, Freud believed that the unconscious  drives the meaning of the dream. Jung made a lot of great contributions and discoveries  within the interpretation of dreaming world. There is so much happening on a daily basis in a person’s life that these  intricate dreams are bound to happen. Stress indeed affects one’s dreaming in multiple  ways. On a day­to­day basis, so much is occurring within the mind of the common person  from everything going on around them. One’s brain is constantly receiving stimuli and  sending off impulses to respond to events and situations. A person is always assessing  these situations and thinking about many different things that go along with them whether  they notice themselves doing it or not. The level of stress does have an affect on the  dreaming as well. Whether it’s relationships, school, jobs, or any other significant factor  in one’s life, there is almost always some type of stress placed on an individual.             When we feel unprepared or powerless, we become stressed and have a sense of  anxiety. This feeling carries over into our unconscious, and a dream is then formed. A  common example of feeling unprepared or powerless would be, running to catch a flight,  4 [Type text] [Type text] [Type text] or being unable to find something. These events are referred to as an anxiety dream, and  it occurs during the last third of your sleep cycle, also known as REM sleep (Rheenen).  Some of the top reasons for anxiety dreams
More Less

Related notes for PSY 322

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit