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CMLT 275 Study Guide - Comprehensive Final Exam Guide - Septimus Heap, Fairy Tale, Reminiscing


Department
Comparative Literature Program
Course Code
CMLT 275
Professor
Tung-An Wei
Study Guide
Final

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CMLT 275

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The story features mostly George’s views of his wife Evadne. Describe what kind of woman
Evadne is. Pay attention to George’s language and his focus. For example, does he focus on
his wife’s sensuous, physical features or her intellect?
One of the most striking things upon reading this piece was the strong, hateful diction that
the narrator uses to describe George’s feelings towards Evadne. His hatred toward his wife is
most clearly exemplified when he runs out of the house after Evadne, convinced she is
meeting a lover as he screams out to God saying “…let me strangle her. Or bury a knife deep
in her breast” (page 4). And while his hatred is obvious through George’s own dialogue, the
interesting piece is the manner in which the narrator describes George’s feelings. When
describing Evadne, the narrator often focuses on physical features such as her plaited black
hair or her skin. These features are usually explained with a sort of longing; “…luminous
yellow skin…great humid black eyes…thick golden neck…” (page 1). Clearly he resents
Evadne but there is an obvious sexual longing he feels towards her.
1. The story features mostly Susan’s point of view. According to her, why does the story
have to end in this way? Is the ending warranted by her reasoning or feelings?
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Throughout the piece, Susan is shown as gradually sinking into depression as she realizes her
seemingly perfect life is marred by infidelity and a lack of purpose. Towards the end, Susan’s
depression shows vividly as “she turned her face into the dark of his flesh, and listened to the
blood, and listened to the blood pounding through her ears saying: I am alone…” (page 15).
Even lying next to her husband, she recognizes how alone she is in her worries. She knows
that her husband’s affair is more than he lets on and he also does not realize that she had
fabricated one. So her reasoning for ending her life, in her mind, is valid. She believes she is
alone in life, and believes her husband would rather think she had an affair than be a woman
depressed and trapped within her own marriage.
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