Get 2 days of premium access
Study Guides (370,000)
US (220,000)
UMD (10,000)
CCJS (60)
Study Guide

[CCJS 105] - Final Exam Guide - Everything you need to know! (42 pages long)


Department
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Course Code
CCJS 105
Professor
katie Zafft
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 42 pages of the document.
UMD
CCJS 105
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

EXAM 1: Class Notes 8.29.16 (Week 1-4)
Crime and Criminal Behavior
o Criminology is the study of knowledge regarding crime as a social
phenomenon (Sutherland)
o 3 Parts
Law: our way of putting social norms into enforced laws
Crime: legal component, not just deviance i.e. murder
Treatment/prevention: how we respond to that breaking of law i.e.
prison, court, cold-e-sac
o The Necessity of Law
Two violations of social norms
Deviance:
o decided to sit on the floor is not the norm
o Dealt with informally
Crime:
o against the law, punching a professor
o Dealt with through laws
o Development of law
Consensus Theory
Crimes are defined as actions that threaten society’s survival
Everyone agrees that is should be a crime i.e. treason
Law reflects the values of everyone in society
Conflict Theory
Crimes are actions that threaten those in power
The ruling class makes laws in order to protect their power
and control those without power
Laws reflect the values of the ruling class in society
o Ex: Slavery, cheaper cocaine is much more criminalized
than more expensive cocaine
Consensus can turn to conflict when the power gets to the rulers’
heads
o Crime
A violation of criminal law that I subject to punishment
A violent and property crime rate in the US increases in the 1980s and
decreased since about 1996, the spike was due to the crack-cocaine
epidemic and Rodney King
Someone has to have done it before in order to realize it’s a crime
o Criminal Behavior
Why do people commit murder? And other questions like that
Ex: you offend the most in your 20s and then you offend less
and less by age
You become a criminal if you’re caught
Depends on how serious the crime committed is
Dependent on age
Depends on frequency of committing the crime
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Many are wrongly convicted of a crime but they are still considered
criminals
Wrong place at the wrong time
Motive of committing the crime can come into play, the situation the
criminal is in
Ex: what if you’re forced to commit a crime like an
impoverished mother stealing diapers for her kids or you could
be killed if you do not commit the crime
o Treatment and Prevention
Prevention involves studying deterrence and delinquency risk factors
How do we make the curve of risk factors decrease?
Treatment involves study of Criminal Justice System after you commit
crime, what happens?
There is a graph that shows how you go from crime to out of the
system
o Criminologists study law, crime, and treatment/prevention
Law and Justice Process
o 7 ingredients
Voluntary rational action
Voluntary: your thoughts lead to your action
Rational: not overwhelmingly influenced by other forces
beyond one’s control
Action: includes thoughtful inaction
o Ex: failure to register as a sex offender
o Ex: you do something that is wrong
Actus Reus
An act that is guilty, evil, and prohibited
It is a crime that is against the law
A crime is not a crime until it is made criminal by law before
the action is committed
o Ex: coca cola used to put cocaine in their drink which
used to not be against the law
Mens Rea
Guilty Mind
Crime is only committed when the actor knows what they have
done is wrong
You meant to do it and you know what you did was wrong
There are Exceptions
There are also Strict Liability Laws: doesn’t matter whether
you meant to do it or not, you will still be charger
o Running a stop light on accident
Causation
Legal responsibility for harm depends on action-consequence
connection
Connection action and concurrence
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version