Study Guides (248,280)
United States (123,315)
Economics (62)
ECON 200 (27)
all (6)

PRIN MICRO-ECONOMICS COMPLETE NOTES [4.0ed the course]

33 Pages
293 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 200
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Econ 200: Supply and Demand 09/12/2013 Topics:  Demand Demand Curve Shifters Normal good Inferior good Complements Substitutes Supply Supply Curve Shifters “Predict the Effects of . . . . “ ­Suppose the number of buyers increases. Then, at each price, quantity demanded will increase Determinants of demand: Price (causes a movement along the D curve) # of Buyers (shifts the D curve) Income (Shifts the D curve) Price of related goods (shifts the D curve) Tastes and Expectations (Shifts the D curve) ­A normal good is one that is positively related to income  An increase in income causes increase in demand, shifting the D curve to the right.   A decrease in income causes a decrease in demand and the D curve to shift to the left. ­An inferior good is a good that is negatively related to income An increase in income causes a decrease in demand and the D curve shifts to the right Ie: Bus service, cheap beer ­Two goods are substitutes if an increase in the price of one causes an increase in demand for the other ­Two goods are compliments if an increase in the price of one causes a fall in demand for the other ­Expectations affect consumers buying decisions Price causes a movement along the S curve Input prices shifts the S curve Technology shifts the S curve # of Sellers shifts the S curve Expectations shifts the S curve Input price examples: wages, price of raw materials A fall in input prices make production more profitable at each output price, so firms supply a larger quantity  at each price, and the S curve shifts to the right ­Increase in the # of sellers increases the quantity supplied at each price, shifts the S curve to the right If a firm expects the price to rise they may reduce the supply now  To determine the effects of any event 1. Decide whether event shifts S curve, D curve, or both 2. Decide in which direction curve shifts 3. Use supply­demand diagram to see how the shift changes Eq P and Eq Q Change in Demand (increase in price of gas) Step 1: D curve shifts Step 2: D Shifts right Step 3: Shift causes an increase in price and quantity Change in supply (technology reduces production costs) Step 1: S curve shifts Step 2: S shifts right Step 3: The shift causes price to fall and quantity to rise Change in both supply and demand Step 1: Both curves shift Step 2: Both shift to the right Step 3: Q rises, but effect on P is ambiguous. If demand increases more than supply, P rises Econ 200: Supply and Demand 09/12/2013 ­Competitive Market: Many buyers and sellers, no one can determine price, price is determined by the  market and individuals “take” the price as given ­Buyers and sellers in a competitive market are price takers; they must accept the price that is set by the  market Sellers cannot charge a higher price Buyers cannot negotiate a lower price Clicker Questions: 1. What is the market for sweatshirts if a hurricane damages cotton crops? Supply decreases; eq P rises and eq Q falls 2. What is the effect on the market for sweatshirts if the price of leather jackets falls? Demand decreases; eq P falls and eq Q falls 3. Assume coffee and tea are substitutes. If the price of coffee rises demand for tea will fall False 4. Assume coffee and tea are substitutes. If the price of coffee falls demand for tea will fall True 5. Assume coffee and tea are complements. If the price of coffee falls demand for tea will rise True 6. Assume coffee is a normal good. If income increases, the quantity demanded will rise False 7. Assume coffee is an inferior good. If income increases, demand will fall.  True 8. Assume coffee is a normal good. If income increases, demand will rise True Econ 200: Supply and Demand 09/12/2013 9. Suppose that in October the price of a cup of latte was $1.50 and 400 lattes were consumed. In  November the price of a latte was $2.00 and 600 were consumed The price of tea (a substitute for café) rose The price of lattes increased and the quantity of lattes increased 10. Suppose that in 1996, 8 mil cars were purchased at $15k each, while in 1997, 10 million cars were  purchased at $12k each. What might have  caused this change? There was a technological advance in auto manufacturing 11. Rent control in New York is an example of  Price Ceiling  ­Price ceiling: A legal maximum on the price of a good or service (ie rent control) ­Price floor: A legal minimum on the price of a good or service (ie agricultural markets, minimum wage) ­A price ceiling above the equilibrium price is not binding­ it has no effect on the market outcome Econ 200: Price Controls 09/12/2013 Clicker Questions 1. A legal maximum price at which a good can be sold is a price ceiling 2. To say that a price ceiling is binding Is to say that the price ceiling  Results in excess demand 3. An example of a binding price floor is The minimum wage 4. An increase in the minimum wage causes a decrease in unemployment False 5. Which side of the market is more likely to lobby government for a price floor Sellers ­Floor is a binding constraint on the wage, and causes a surplus ­A price floor below the equilibrium price is not binding­it has no effect on the market outcome ­Rent Control in NYC Shortage, suppliers have no incentive to maintain units, they resort to non­price rationing mechanisms,  renters stay in controlled units ­Gasoline Price controls of the 1970s OPEC implemented an embargo on exporting oil, supply of oil to US fell, US gov’t responded with price  controls (a price ceiling) ­Normative statement: claims about how the world should be ­Positive statement: observations about how the world is ­Equity: distributing resources fairly among members of society ­Efficiency: getting the most from society’s resources ­Henry Ford was the homie and hooked it up with PHAT wages ­Black Market: a “black market” can emerge when the real market is not allowed to clear, illegal markets that  arise when price control are in place ­Prices as a rationing system: impersonal, efficient, and fair? ­ Welfare Economics 09/12/2013 Topics for today: welfare economics, equity, efficiency, willingness to pay, consumer surplus, cost, producer  surplus, total surplus Welfare Economics 09/12/2013 Welfare Econ­ How to measure the “well being” of society? Efficiency and equity Efficiency­ Society will be better off if we are able to produce more goods and service. The more stuff we  have, ceteris paribus, the better of we are Equity­ There is a general sense that some ways of distributing the goods across members of society are  more fair than others ­Markets create benefits to both consumers and producers (mutualism) ­A buyers willingness to pay for a good is the maximum amount the buyer will pay for that good ­A marginal buyer is the buyer who would leave the market if P were any higher. The consumer surplus of  the marginal buyer is 0 ­Consumer surplus is the amount a buyer is willing to pay minus the buyer actually pays ­Cost is the value of everything a seller must give up to produce a good (including opportunity cost) ­A marginal seller is the seller who would leave the market if the price were any lower ­Producer Surplus is the amount a seller is paid for a good minus the seller’s cost ­Total surplus= CS+PS, it measures the total gains from trade In a market ­In a market economy, the allocation of resources is decentralized, determined by the interactions of many  self­interested buyers and sellers ­We use total surplus as a measure of society’s well being ­Total surplus is used to measure the “well­being” of society according to the efficiency standard, a  particular outcome is said to be efficient if it maximizes total surplus, market outcomes are efficient ­An allocation of resources is efficient if it maximizes total surplus ­Efficiency means making the pie as big as possible, while equity refers to whether the pie is divided fairly Clicker Questions 1.The gain of $20 is called a. Consumer surplus Welfare Economics 09/12/2013 2. If the price is $200, who will buy an iPad and what is the total quantity demanded? Liam and Harry will each buy an ipad, quantity demanded is 2 3. Consumer surplus at P=$30 is $225 4. A consumers willingness to pay measures how much a buyer values a good 5. In a market, the marginal buyer is the buyer who would be the first to leave the market if the price were any higher 6. .50 a can, hes willing to pay .95 for the 1 , .80 for the 2 , .60 for the third, and .40 for the fourth. What is  the consumer surplus? $.95 7. On a graph, consumer surplus is the area Below the demand curve and above price 8.  Welfare Economics  09/12/2013 ­Topics Today: Efficiency, market outcomes, market failures, market power, externalities, public goods and  common ­Efficiency: total surplus is used to measure the “well being” of society according to the efficiency standard,  something is efficient if it maximizes total surplus ­Market Outcomes are efficient when equilibrium P+Q maximize total surplus, the “right” amount of each  good is produced ­Market failures refer to the inability of unregulated markets to allocate resources efficiently ­Total surplus: captures the gains from trade in a market =Consumer surplus + Producer Surplus ­Total surplus is the measurement of efficiency ­An allocation of resources is efficient if it maximizes total surplus ­Adam Smith and the Invisible Hand, father of modern economics, Said sellers will do whatever to make  their product as cheap as possible and that buyers will try and buy it at the cheapest price possible ­Limited government enhances society ­Market power is the inability to influence the price (not a price taker) ­Monopoly is a single seller ­Oligopoly is when a group of sellers act together in order to gain market power ­Externalities are when market activity produces side effects, costs or benefits to people who are not buyers  or sellers ­Market failure is when markets fail to allocate resources efficiently ­There are some goods which by their nature are not suited for production and consumption in markets like  public goods and common resources (ie; bridges, overfishing in the Potomac bay) Clicker Questions 1. Is total surplus maximized at the market equilibrium? Yes because at quantities less than equilibrium, buyers value exceeds sellers costs and… 2. Who is considered the “father of modern economics” and coined the term “invisible hand”? Adam Smith 3. Which of the following statements is not true? Total surplus in a market is consumer surplus minus  Tax Incidence and Deadweight Loss 09/12/2013 ­Topics: Taxes, How taxes affect market outcomes, how taxes affect welfare, deadweight loss ­Excise tax is a tax paid when purchases are made of a specific good ­How taxes affect market out comes (consider a market in equilibrium) Step 1: Determine whether the tax will affect the demand or supply of a good Step 2: Determine how demand or supply is affected Step 3: Determine the new equilibrium price and quantity ­The incidence of a tax: the manner in which the burden of a tax is shared among participants in a market.  How the burden of a tax is shared among market participants ­A tax drives a wedge between the price buyers pay and the price sellers receive ­A tax raises revenue for the government ­A tax also distorts the market ­The distortion occurs because there are fewer units of the taxed good bough and sold ­The equilibrium quantity of the good falls ­We’ll use the concepts of CS, PS and total surplus to quantify the distortion ­Deadweight loss of the tax is the fall in total surplus that results from a market distortion, such as a tax Government Policies and Welfare 09/12/2013 Topics today: Tax incidence, statutory incidence, economic incidence, quantity controls ­Statutory incidence refers to who is legally responsible for paying the tax ­Economic incidence refers to the manner in which the burden of the tax is shared among market  participants ­A tax drives a wedge between the price buyers pay and the price sellers receive ­Incidence to buyers: buyers price minus no­tax equilibrium price ­Incidence to sellers: no tax equilibrium price minus sellers price ­To calculate tax revenue do L x W for entire big rectangle created by tax ­For deadweight loss calculate triangles created by the tax Elasticity 09/12/2013 ­Topics today: Elasticity, price elasticity of demand (definition, calculation), price elasticity of demand and  the demand curve, price elasticity of demand and a linear demand curve, price elasticity of demand and  total revenue Elasticity 09/12/2013 ­Elasticity is a measure of the responsiveness of Q to a change in price Price elasticity of demand Price elasticity of demand Cross price elasticity of demand ­Income elasticity of demand is a measure of the responsiveness of Q to a change in income ­Law of demand doesn’t answer how responsive quantity demanded is to a change in price ­Very responsive >>> large change in quantity >>> elastic ­Not very responsive >>> small change in quantity>>>inelastic  ­Price elasticity of demand = % change in Qd/Percentage change in P ­Demand is said to be “elastic” if the price elasticity of demand is >1, the numerator is bigger than the  denominator ­Standard method of computing the % change is  (End value­Start value/Start value) X 100% ­In this class we use (End value­Start value/Midpoint) X 100% ­The price of elasticity of demand depends on The extent to which close substitutes are available Whether the good is a necessity or a luxury Market definition The time horizon: elasticity is higher in the long run than the short run ­The price elasticity of demand is closely related to the slope of the demand curve ­Rule of thumb: the flatter the curve, the bigger the elasticity the steeper the curve, the smaller the elasticity ­“inelastic demand” is price of elasticity of demand = % change in Q/% change in P = <10%/10% 10%/10% >1 D curve:  relatively flat, consumers price sensitivity: relatively high, elasticity >1 ­Perfectly elastic demand (the other extreme) Price elasticity of demand = % change in Q/% change in P=  any %/0% = infinity, D curve: horizontal, consumers price sensitivity: extreme, elasticity: infinity Elasticity 09/12/2013 ­Inelastic demand curves is quantity demanded will be the same regardless of the price ­Demand is said to be “inelastic” when its non­responsive to price ­Demand is said to be “elastic” when quantity demanded will be the same regardless of the price ­ Elasticity 09/12/2013 ­Topics Today: Price elasticity of demand, elasticity of demand and linear demand curve, elasticity and total  revenue, elasticity in the real world, income elasticity of demand, cross price elasticity of demand ­The slope of a linear demand curve is constant, but its elasticity is not ­A price increase has two effects on revenue: higher P means more revenue on each unit you sell, but you  sell fewer units (lower Q), due to Law of demand ­Revenue=P x Q ­When D is elastic, a price increase causes revenue to fall ­The fall in revenue from lower Q is smaller than the increase in revenue from higher P, so revenue rises ­If demand is elastic and price increases then total revenue will fall ­If demand is elastic and price decreases then total revenue will rise ­If demand is inelastic and price increases then total revenue will rise ­If demand is inelastic and price decreases then total revenue will fall ­Elasticity estimates: economists estimate the price elasticity of demand, policy analysts, economists in the  private sector ­The income elasticity of demand measures the respons of Qd to a change in consumer income ­Income elasticity of demand = % change in Qd/% change in income ­An increase in income causes an increase in demand for a normal good ­For normal goods, income elasticity > 0 ­For inferior goods, income elasticity 
More Less

Related notes for ECON 200

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit